Age discrimination


Kreskin
#1
Should companies be able to discriminate on pricing based on the age of the customer? Doesn't the Canadian Charter of Rights prohibit discrimination based on a number of factors including age?

The senior age group holds a ton of wealth, and it's generally debt free. Why in heck should a 45 year old pay more to see a movie than a 66 year old?
 
Pangloss
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

Should companies be able to discriminate on pricing based on the age of the customer? Doesn't the Canadian Charter of Rights prohibit discrimination based on a number of factors including age?

The senior age group holds a ton of wealth, and it's generally debt free. Why in heck should a 45 year old pay more to see a movie than a 66 year old?

Good question, Kreskin.

Should companies be able to charge different prices for different people?

What if there is a group whose members are chronically poor? Retirees, for example, probably have less disposable income than working folks, most especially true if they are on fixed incomes.

Consider that, and also consider that they have been paying into the system all their lives - maybe they should get a break.

But what about making somebody else pay more? If old folks pay less, than non-old folks, by definition, pay more.

What about women - most surveys show women make less money than men - should there be "lady's pricing"?

Then the men pay more.

Recent immigrants and visible minorities and the disabled also make less - does that mean able-bodied white male citizens should carry the rest of the country?

I think my argument, by the way, is bunk - we've had "seniors prices" all across the economy for decades and it seems to work just fine and have wide public support.

Maybe sometimes we think inequality does not always result in unfairness.

Pangloss
 
Zan
#3
For the most part I agree Kreskin, why should anyone pay a different price for the same product or service?

My son can get a haircut for under $20.00. I can't get one for under $40.00, and usually it's more like $60.00. I've also read that in general, men pay a different price for drycleaning shirts than women do for blouses.

With seniors however, I always assumed it was a small way of acknowledging the life time contribution of our elderly population to society. For that reason, I don't mind that segment of the population getting a deal.
 
Kreskin
#4
Good points. While it's possible that seniors have less disposable income they have plenty more assets that can be converted into income. Most of them pass away with a pile of money in bank accounts while the working stiffs are paying enormous pre-retirement debt and assorted expenses. Seniors aren't disadvantaged as a whole.

My issue isn't about seniors paying less, it's about non-senior adults paying more, discriminated against by one factor (one that's often irrelevant). It doesn't seem fair to me in the slightest.
 
Twila
#5
I'm all for senior's discounts. With a bit of luck I'll get the opportunity to enjoy them myself...and if I don't get the opportunity well I'll be dead and won't care.
 
Pangloss
#6
Kreskin:

If we're talking about seniors with clear title on their homes - then sure, I agree with you. What of the seniors that rent? I rather suspect that most seniors are less well off then the rest of us.

But that's beside the point, sort of. Differential pricing needs to be justifiable and supported by the public - it must be seen as fair by some measure.

This looks like it meets those conditions.

Pangloss
 
#juan
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by ZanView Post

For the most part I agree Kreskin, why should anyone pay a different price for the same product or service?

My son can get a haircut for under $20.00. I can't get one for under $40.00, and usually it's more like $60.00. I've also read that in general, men pay a different price for drycleaning shirts than women do for blouses.

With seniors however, I always assumed it was a small way of acknowledging the life time contribution of our elderly population to society. For that reason, I don't mind that segment of the population getting a deal.

This is grossly unfair. Your son pays $20 for a haircut and I'm asked for the same even though I have maybe a quarter of the hair he's got. In terms of work done, a barber can cut my hair in a couple minutes and if your son is like my grandson, he has at least four times my volume. I protest....
 
Kreskin
#8
I'm all for giving seniors a cut in price at a barber shop, since the pricing is more appropriate to the service provided. But to go on a ferry or watch a movie, not.
 
#juan
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

I'm all for giving seniors a cut in price at a barber shop, since the pricing is more appropriate to the service provided. But to go on a ferry or watch a movie, not.

Then you'll be happy to learn that during the week I get on the ferry for nothing. Unfortunately, free doesn't extend to my car. I feel it is my right because of all that waiting in line over the years...the movies too...
 
Kreskin
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Then you'll be happy to learn that during the week I get on the ferry for nothing. Unfortunately, free doesn't extend to my car. I feel it is my right because of all that waiting in line over the years...the movies too...

For that you should pay $40 for a haircut.
 
Pangloss
#11
What about another group - war vets?

I'm just trying to see if it is the principle of the thing or if it's the group.

Pangloss
 
#juan
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

For that you should pay $40 for a haircut.

Hey, in the movie theatre they knock a dollar or two off the admission fee but they still charge almost six bucks for a large popcorn and another three or four for a drink. I took my grandson and two of his friends and the bill was close to seventy dollars. There ain't no justice....
 
JoeSchmoe
#13
Often seniors, the disabled and youth have limited funds. There's nothing wrong with giving them a discount.
 
Kreskin
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Hey, in the movie theatre they knock a dollar or two off the admission fee but they still charge almost six bucks for a large popcorn and another three or four for a drink. I took my grandson and two of his friends and the bill was close to seventy dollars. There ain't no justice....

A theatre these days is highway robbery.
 
Kreskin
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by PanglossView Post

What about another group - war vets?

I'm just trying to see if it is the principle of the thing or if it's the group.

Pangloss

That might be better because they have often forfeited the opportunity to make money to serve the country.
 
Kreskin
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by JoeSchmoeView Post

Often seniors, the disabled and youth have limited funds. There's nothing wrong with giving them a discount.

They usually don't provide discounts to the disabled at the box office. If they're under 65 they pay the freight.
 
talloola
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

Should companies be able to discriminate on pricing based on the age of the customer? Doesn't the Canadian Charter of Rights prohibit discrimination based on a number of factors including age?

The senior age group holds a ton of wealth, and it's generally debt free. Why in heck should a 45 year old pay more to see a movie than a 66 year old?

You forgot to mention the seniors who haven't much of anything at all, actually very poor.
 
Kreskin
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by talloolaView Post

You forgot to mention the seniors who haven't much of anything at all, actually very poor.

I also didn't mention the under 65's who don't have much at all.
 
Zan
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

This is grossly unfair. Your son pays $20 for a haircut and I'm asked for the same even though I have maybe a quarter of the hair he's got. In terms of work done, a barber can cut my hair in a couple minutes and if your son is like my grandson, he has at least four times my volume. I protest....


but look on the bright side Juan, a bottle of shampoo will last you 4 times longer !
 
shadowshiv
#20
I feel that seniors should have a discount. It's not like there are a ton of perks that come with old age.
 
Pangloss
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by shadowshivView Post

I feel that seniors should have a discount. It's not like there are a ton of perks that come with old age.

Shadow:

What do you base that assertion on? Happiness tends to increase with age - even though our bodies aren't what they used to be.

What about the perks I'm missing out on being middle aged?

Teenagers certainly feel put upon and without many of the rights we just assume because of the length of tenancy in our ever-older bodies.

I can go for a beer any time I want - I can drive - I can sign contracts, get a credit card, rent a car - ask a sixteen year old how they feel about that.

Pangloss
 
#juan
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by ZanView Post

but look on the bright side Juan, a bottle of shampoo will last you 4 times longer !

You may be right but the system is still designed against grandparents. When we retired we thought we would sell our house and downsize. Not a hope. When your kids grow up and have children of their own, it's the grandparents who need more room to put everybody up when they all arrive at Christmas. Much more of this prosperity and I'll be broke.
 
shadowshiv
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by PanglossView Post

Shadow:

What do you base that assertion on? Happiness tends to increase with age - even though our bodies aren't what they used to be.

What about the perks I'm missing out on being middle aged?

Teenagers certainly feel put upon and without many of the rights we just assume because of the length of tenancy in our ever-older bodies.

I can go for a beer any time I want - I can drive - I can sign contracts, get a credit card, rent a car - ask a sixteen year old how they feel about that.

Pangloss

I see you missed the smilie that I used.
 
talloola
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

I also didn't mention the under 65's who don't have much at all.

That's right, what is the percentage of seniors well-off, compared to those struggling?
 
Tonington
#25
The insurance industry was getting away with it for a long time. It cost me $2600 dollars a year to insure a $2500 car. Now that age is out of the picture, as well as gender and driving records are what count, I'm much happier.
 
Pangloss
#26
Shadow:

Forgive me for being thick as a brick - does the smilie indicate sarcasm?

Pangloss
 
Zan
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

You may be right but the system is still designed against grandparents. When we retired we thought we would sell our house and downsize. Not a hope. When your kids grow up and have children of their own, it's the grandparents who need more room to put everybody up when they all arrive at Christmas. Much more of this prosperity and I'll be broke.

Jeeze... when ya put it like that.......... .... and I bet they use half a year's worth of shampoo up when they all visit too. That does it. I don't think I can afford to grow old.
 
Kreskin
#28

This is from statscan. The threshhold for low after-tax income is not stated but whatever it is they show the percentage of each age category that's under it. As of 2005 seniors are shown at 6.1%. Ages 18-64 are 11.4%.
 
shadowshiv
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by PanglossView Post

Shadow:

Forgive me for being thick as a brick - does the smilie indicate sarcasm?

Pangloss

No, in this case it was just me being less-than-serious. I try not to ruffle any feathers if I can help it.
 
Niflmir
#30
I have complained about this sort of thing my entire life. People don't really take an eight year old seriously when he says he is being discriminated against however.

At sixteen, a Canadian is basically obliged to work. If not, they may not be able to go to university or have money for clothes etc. which is not necessary in many other industrialized countries, say Portugal. In Nova Scotia the drinking age is 19, yet at 18 with a valid driver's license one can drive to Montreal and legally drink. Furthermore, there are far more deaths associated with automobile accidents than with drinking accidents alone, so the ability to endanger other lives at 16 when contrasted with the ability to endanger my own life at 19/18 is absurd.

Then there is of course the senior's discount. I walk into a store and state that I am 65. If they don't laugh at me outright they will ask for ID. They have just broken the law. It is illegal to ask for ID before serving me where the product is not regulated by law. Of course I can walk across the street and find a store that gives seniors discounts at 55, so it too is absurdly arbitrary.

The arbitrary nature of drawing a line is what defines discrimination. There is no question that it is discrimination. The problem is that the very first section of our charter gives the government power to impose reasonable limits. But is such geographic arbitrariness really reasonable? At the very least shouldn't they fix an age for all of Canada? How exactly do these things benefit a free and democratic society, other than through providing a sense of entitlement?
 

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