Measuring Teacher Diversity


Linda67
#1
There are two indexes to measure the diversity of the Texas Teachers (external - login to view)’ force, compared to the diversity of the student body. One index, the teacher diversity index, compares the ethnic makeup of the teaching force of each campus with the ethnic makeup of the students in the state - 48 percent white, 35 percent Hispanic, and 14 percent African American. The other index, the student/teacher correspondence index, compares the ethnic makeup of the teaching force of each campus with the ethnic makeup of the students on that campus.

The diversity of the 4,613 campuses with more than 20 Texas Teachers (external - login to view) was analyzed. Smaller campuses were excluded from the analysis to avoid the distortion that can occur when calculating percentages based on small numbers. The value of the indexes can range from zero to 100, with 100 representing the standard of diversity measured by the index. For example, 100 on the teacher diversity index represents a teaching force that is 48 percent white, 35 percent Hispanic, and 14 percent African American. A 100 on the student/teacher correspondence index represents a teaching force that matches the ethnicity of the students on the campus, whatever the ethnic makeup of the student body.

Campuses in major urban districts have the most diverse teaching staffs. Their Texas teacher diversity index score of 72 is the highest of any group. The least diverse campuses are in the rural school districts, with a teacher diversity index score of 52. The campuses in other types of communities fall within a range of 56 to 59.
 
sanctus
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by Linda67View Post

There are two indexes to measure the diversity of the Texas Teachers’ force, compared to the diversity of the student body. One index, the teacher diversity index, compares the ethnic makeup of the teaching force of each campus with the ethnic makeup of the students in the state - 48 percent white, 35 percent Hispanic, and 14 percent African American. The other index, the student/teacher correspondence index, compares the ethnic makeup of the teaching force of each campus with the ethnic makeup of the students on that campus.
The diversity of the 4,613 campuses with more than 20 Texas Teachers was analyzed. Smaller campuses were excluded from the analysis to avoid the distortion that can occur when calculating percentages based on small numbers. The value of the indexes can range from zero to 100, with 100 representing the standard of diversity measured by the index. For example, 100 on the teacher diversity index represents a teaching force that is 48 percent white, 35 percent Hispanic, and 14 percent African American. A 100 on the student/teacher correspondence index represents a teaching force that matches the ethnicity of the students on the campus, whatever the ethnic makeup of the student body.
Campuses in major urban districts have the most diverse teaching staffs....

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post

?????????????, welcome to the forum....but.as to your post..welll. so? What are you trying to say with this topic?
 
tamarin
#3
My goodness, I shall have to get busy forming my own indexes. I had forgotten we live in a society that must measure the smallest blip, the slightest tick and the faintest click of life in the broth about us. With this index mentioned, I expect it's to be used as a prod to further the ends of some group. We are study-mad, at least tiny frenetic sections of us are, and we think the activity noble. Can't think but there has to be a better way to make a living.
 
sanctus
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by tamarinView Post

My goodness, I shall have to get busy forming my own indexes. I had forgotten we live in a society that must measure the smallest blip, the slightest tick and the faintest click of life in the broth about us. With this index mentioned, I expect it's to be used as a prod to further the ends of some group. We are study-mad, at least tiny frenetic sections of us are, and we think the activity noble. Can't think but there has to be a better way to make a living.

Very true. Surveys, studies, oodles of cash given to these groups to find out anything you could possibly want to know about the dumbest things.

Just got a report from my diocese from a study group hired by our Bishop's office to find out the average age of teenagers who stop going to Mass...I mean....they needed to pay someone to find this out?
 
tamarin
#5
Studies are an industry. They pad costs across the country and figure in local, provincial and federal budgets in all areas. It's time more said, as has happened locally here: What do we need a study of that for!
 

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