obligated or obliged? (Obligated Obliged)


View Poll Results: which is the correct word?
Obliged 2 66.67%
Obligated 1 33.33%
Voters: 3. You may not vote on this poll

hermanntrude
#1
personally i think obligated would have been a bushism if only someone else hadnt already used it. Obliged is the word.
 
#juan
#2
My dictionary gives the same meaning for both. I'm sure I have used, and have heard both words used for at least the last 35 or more years. I don't think in this day and age, that we can call either wrong, but "obliged" is shorter and I'm all for more efficiency.
 
karrie
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by hermanntrudeView Post

personally i think obligated would have been a bushism if only someone else hadnt already used it. Obliged is the word.

which other thread did this poll pop up from? what's the context? both are words, so, without knowing the context, it's hard to say which is 'right'.
 
karrie
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

My dictionary gives the same meaning for both. I'm sure I have used, and have heard both words used for at least the last 35 or more years. I don't think in this day and age, that we can call either wrong, but "obliged" is shorter and I'm all for more efficiency.

The way I always understood it is that to say 'obligated' is to refer to something you have to do. To say 'obliged' is to refer to something you intend or want to do, but can refrain from doing without serious repurcussions.

"I'm obliged to vote in this thread, but I'm not obligated to do so."
 
#juan
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

The way I always understood it is that to say 'obligated' is to refer to something you have to do. To say 'obliged' is to refer to something you intend or want to do, but can refrain from doing without serious repurcussions.

"I'm obliged to vote in this thread, but I'm not obligated to do so."

I think you might have something there. If one is "obligated", it implies a moral debt, or even a legal debt, to do something , or not do something, or to follow a course of action because of that debt.

"Obliged" is something less. People can say, "much obliged", in answer to a common courtesy like someone holding a door open for you.
 
hermanntrude
#6
i didnt know there was a distinction. I've noticed that before with language though. some words start off meaning the same thing but grow away from each other and become a little more fine-tuned. that's waht makes english so great i think, the redundancy from the combination of so many tongues has lead to a great deal of fine tuning and so one can be very precise about what you mean
 
#juan
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by hermanntrudeView Post

i didnt know there was a distinction. I've noticed that before with language though. some words start off meaning the same thing but grow away from each other and become a little more fine-tuned. that's waht makes english so great i think, the redundancy from the combination of so many tongues has lead to a great deal of fine tuning and so one can be very precise about what you mean

I may be just blowing smoke here and very likely "obligate" or "obligated" are simply expansions of the root word "oblige". I'm afraid I'm not an English scholar. You are right that words do evol;ve and grow over the years. I'm not abandoning my previous post, but simply pointing out my inexpertise.
 
hermanntrude
#8
oblige is a strange word though because it can be something you do or something that you have to do.

we say "much obliged" when someone has done something for us. this means "I will have to repay you" which to my mind always seemed the same as "i am obligated to you".
 
Tonington
#9
Heres what the online etymology dictionary says:

oblige (external - login to view) 1297, "to bind by oath," from O.Fr. obligier, from L. obligare, from ob "to" + ligare "to bind," from PIE base *leig- "to bind" (see ligament (external - login to view)). Main modern meaning "to make (someone) indebted by conferring a benefit or kindness" is from 1567; be obliged "be bound by ties of gratitude" is from 1548. Obliging "willing to do service or favors" is attested from 1632.
obligation (external - login to view) 1297, from O.Fr. obligation (1235), from L. obligationem (nom. obligatio) "an engaging or pledging," lit. "a binding" (but rarely used in this sense), noun of action from obligare (see oblige (external - login to view)). The notion is of binding with promises or by law or duty. Oblige, with which it is usually confused, means "to do one a favor."
 
hermanntrude
#10
ive been browsing a bit on this and it seems it's pretty vague. A few sources seem to indicate that obligated is the more binding form, for instance legally obligated to pay fines. most seem to suggest they're the same word. Everyone's quite vague about it.
 
vinod1975
#11
obliged Aadjective1 duty-bound(p) (external - login to view), obliged(p) (external - login to view)
under a moral obligation to do something
obligated Aadjective1 obligated(p) (external - login to view)
caused by law or conscience to follow a certain course; "felt obligated to repay the kindness"; "was obligated to pay off the student loan"
 
hermanntrude
#12
I'm won over. I agree that obliged and obligated are separate words and there are correct uses for each.

I still suspect that there was a time when obligated didnt exist and people started using it mistakenly
 
L Gilbert
#13
It ddepends on how you are using the words. From www.m-w.com (external - login to view)
Quote:

Main Entry: oblige
Pronunciation: &-'blIj
Function: verb
Inflected Form(s): obliged; oblig·ing
Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French obliger, from Latin obligare, literally, to bind to, from ob- toward + ligare to bind -- more at LIGATURE (external - login to view)
transitive verb
1 : to constrain by physical, moral, or legal force or by the exigencies of circumstance <obliged to find a job>
2 a : to put in one's debt by a favor or service <we are much obliged for your help> b : to do a favor for <always ready to oblige a friend>
intransitive verb : to do something as or as if as a favor

Quote:

Main Entry: 1ob·li·gate
Pronunciation: 'ä-bl&-"gAt
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form(s): -gat·ed; -gat·ing
Etymology: Latin obligatus, past participle of obligare
1 : to bind legally or morally : CONSTRAIN (external - login to view)
2 : to commit (as funds) to meet an obligation (external - login to view)

Main Entry: 2ob·li·gate
Pronunciation: 'ä-bli-g&t, -bl&-"gAt
Function: adjective
1 : restricted to one particularly characteristic mode of life <an obligate parasite>
2 : biologically essential for survival <obligate mutualism>
- ob·li·gate·ly adverb

 
L Gilbert
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by hermanntrudeView Post

I'm won over. I agree that obliged and obligated are separate words and there are correct uses for each.

I still suspect that there was a time when obligated didnt exist and people started using it mistakenly

Ah. You mean like Argentines and Argentinians? Or oriented and orientated?
 
hermanntrude
#15
stirrer.

argentinians was the only one i heard before. and Argies too.

oriented and orientated I heard before but never thought about. hmmmm
 
vinod1975
#16
hey gilbert welcome and you always post information
 
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