Do you think Canada is depending on USA?


View Poll Results: Do you think Canada is depending on the U.S?
Yes 13 52.00%
No 12 48.00%
Voters: 25. You may not vote on this poll

Nightmare
#1
Hey,
I'm trying to do this project and I need your help.
I'm have this poll, so please don't mess it up.
Thanks a lot!!!
 
Nightmare
#2
Also can you please give reasons. It'll really help.
Thanks again!
 
PsyOp
#3
Depending about what? I would choose yes and no.

I think the whole planet is depending on the U.S.
Economically, we are depending on the U.S. For defence too.
Last edited by PsyOp; Jan 28th, 2007 at 09:24 PM..
 
darkbeaver
#4
That's a strange and difficult question to answer, but I'm difficult and strange enough to say that this Canadian is depending on the USA, I began watching the telly for a bit recently, I depend on thier news and religious channels for comedy and I depend on thier comedy for news, and I depend on thier sports and entertainment for shopping.:laughin g7::la ughing7: No there's nothing wrong with the country it must be me.:la ughing7:
 
#juan
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by PsyOpView Post

Depending about what? I would choose yes and no.

I think the whole planet is depending on the U.S.
Economically, we are depending on the U.S. For defence too.

I wonder if those million or so Iraqi fatalities were depending on the U.S.?

Defence against whom?
 
eh1eh
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverView Post

That's a strange and difficult question to answer, but I'm difficult and strange enough to say that this Canadian is depending on the USA, I began watching the telly for a bit recently, I depend on thier news and religious channels for comedy and I depend on thier comedy for news, and I depend on thier sports and entertainment for shopping.:laughin g7::la ughing7: No there's nothing wrong with the country it must be me.

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post
Well you sure summed that up. As well as Stewart or Colbert.
 
temperance
#7
FIRST off ,what this don't screw it up stuff please be coridally when asking for something --lol gee Im not sure you deserve answers ,lol

I need a few things/answers first
What are you asking for ?
what is the project ?

Just a brief descrption would be nice
 
vinod1975
#8
I dont think so , I am strongly disagree
 
thomaska
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

I wonder if those million or so Iraqi fatalities were depending on the U.S.?

Defence against whom?

Yep, this is the kind of stuff the guy needed for his report.

Not that my post is any more helpful, but it's good to see that something trivial like helping other people out is not going to stop the USA hate around here.
 
vinod1975
#10
Need more votes in favor of " NO"
 
I think not
#11
Here's some info;


U.S.-CANADA RELATIONS
The relationship between the United States and Canada is probably the closest and most extensive in the world. It is reflected in the staggering volume of bilateral trade--the equivalent of $1.4 billion a day in goods, services, and investment income--as well as in people-to-people contact, with well over 100 million crossings of the U.S.-Canadian border every year. In fields ranging from law enforcement cooperation to environmental cooperation to free trade, the two countries work closely on multiple levels from federal to local. In addition to their close bilateral ties, Canada and the U.S. work closely through multilateral fora.

Canada--a charter signatory to the United Nations and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)--takes an active role in the United Nations, including peacekeeping operations, and participates in the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). Canada joined the Organization of American States (OAS) in 1990 and hosted the OAS General Assembly in Windsor in June 2000, and the third Summit of the Americas in Quebec City in April 2001. Canada seeks to expand its ties to Pacific Rim economies through membership in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum (APEC), and will host the winter Olympic Games in Vancouver-Whistler, British Columbia in 2010. Although Canada views good relations with the U.S. as crucial to a wide range of interests, it occasionally pursues independent policies at odds with the United States. In 2003, Canada did not participate in the U.S.-led military coalition that liberated Iraq (although it has contributed financially to Iraq’s reconstruction and provided electoral advice). Other examples are Canada’s leadership in the creation of the UN-created International Criminal Court (ICC) for war crimes--which the U.S. opposes due to fundamental flaws in the treaty that leave the ICC vulnerable to exploitation and politically motivated prosecutions--and Canada’s decision in early 2005 not to participate directly in the U.S. missile defense program. The United States and Canada also differ on the issue of landmines. Canada is a strong proponent of the Ottawa Convention, which bans the use of anti-personnel mines. The United States, while the world’s leading supporter of demining initiatives, declined to sign the treaty due to unmet concerns regarding the protection of its forces and allies, particularly those serving on the Korean Peninsula, as well as the lack of exemptions for mixed munitions.

http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2089.htm

It's a start
 
Curiosity
#12
Goodie ITN

Quote:

U.S.-CANADA RELATIONS
The relationship between the United States and Canada is probably the closest and most extensive in the world. It is reflected in the staggering volume of bilateral trade--the equivalent of $1.4 billion a day in goods, services, and investment income--as well as in people-to-people contact, with well over 100 million crossings of the U.S.-Canadian border every year. In fields ranging from law enforcement cooperation to environmental cooperation to free trade, the two countries work closely on multiple levels from federal to local. In addition to their close bilateral ties, Canada and the U.S. work closely through multilateral fora.

 
vinod1975
#13
Canada (external - login to view)-United States (external - login to view) relations span more than two centuries, marked by a shared British colonial heritage, conflict during the early years of the U.S., and the eventual development of one of the most successful international relationships in the modern world. The most serious breach in the relationship was the War of 1812 (external - login to view), which saw an American invasion of then British North America (external - login to view). Friendship would be solidified in the 20th century with the shared experience of the world wars (external - login to view) and a close alliance during the Cold War (external - login to view).
Canada and the United States are currently the world's largest trading partners, share the world's longest border (external - login to view), and have significant interoperability within the defence sphere. Modern difficulties have included repeated trade disputes (despite a continental trade agreement (external - login to view)), environmental concerns, and debates over immigration and the movement of people across the shared border. While the foreign policies of the neighbours have been largely aligned for much of the post-war era, significant disputes have arisen, including over the Vietnam war (external - login to view), the status of Cuba (external - login to view), and the Iraq war (external - login to view) and War on Terror (external - login to view).
 
Northboy
#14
Two Brothers haggling, one Rich and Proud, one Wealthy and Wise.
But those who think they're wise are foolish indeed....Canada needs some tweaking, but it's my home.
 
vinod1975
#15
At the outset of the American Revolution (external - login to view), the American revolutionaries (external - login to view) regarded the presence of the British Empire (external - login to view) in the Canadian provinces as a strategic threat. French Canadians (external - login to view) were invited to join the resistance by sending representatives to the Continental Congress (external - login to view), and Canada was pre-approved for joining the United States in the Articles of Confederation (external - login to view). When Canada was invaded (external - login to view) during the American Revolutionary War (external - login to view) in an attempt to expel the British from North America (external - login to view), Americans hoped French Canadians would join them in the effort. None of these measures proved successful in uniting Canada with the thirteen American colonies (external - login to view) as most Canadians sided against the U.S., although some Nova Scotians advocated joining the Americans. In peace negotiations, Benjamin Franklin (external - login to view) unsuccessfully attempted to convince British diplomats to cede Canada to the United States. The continued presence of the British Empire in Canada after the war helped to sour relations in the succeeding years, particularly since a great number of Loyalist refugees (external - login to view) from the American colonies resettled in Canada during and after the war.
The Treaty of Paris (1783) (external - login to view) which ended the war called for the British to vacate a number of fortifications along the Great Lakes (external - login to view) border. The British refused to do so, citing failure of the United States to provide financial restitution for Loyalists who had lost property in the war. The Jay Treaty (external - login to view) in 1795 with Great Britain resolved some lingering issues, but tensions mounted again after the turn of the century, erupting into the War of 1812 (external - login to view), when the Americans declared war on the British. The Americans were irked by British harassment of U.S. ships on the high seas, which was a by-product of British involvement in the ongoing Napoleonic Wars (external - login to view). The Americans did not possess a navy capable of challenging the Royal Navy (external - login to view), and so an invasion of Canada was proposed as the only feasible means of attacking the British Empire. Americans on the western frontier also hoped an invasion would bring an end to what they saw as British support of American Indian (external - login to view) resistance to the westward expansion of the United States (external - login to view). The early strategy was to temporarily seize Canada as a means of forcing concessions from the British. As the war progressed, however, outright annexation was more frequently cited as a war aim. Many Americans hoped the Canadians would welcome the chance to overthrow their British rulers. However, the American invasion attempts were repeatedly repulsed, and the war ended as a bitter stalemate, with the animosity created lessening very gradually over the course of the 19th century as commercial and cultural ties grew.
Canada became a self-governing dominion in 1867 while retaining ties to the British crown. Strained relations with the United States continued, however, due to a series of armed incursions named the Fenian raids (external - login to view) by Irish-American (external - login to view) Civil War (external - login to view) veterans across the border from 1866 to 1871 in an attempt to overthrow British interests in North America. While officially the American government did not openly endorse the raids, and did eventually move to disarm the Fenians, the raids created lasting anger in Canada. Many Canadians believed that President Andrew Johnson (external - login to view) initially supported the raids, and that the American government turned a blind eye to these armed incursions for far too long.
A boundary dispute (external - login to view) in the Oregon Country (external - login to view) (Fifty-Four Forty or Fight!) was the most serious disturbance, but was peacefully resolved. In the 1930s, the United States studied plans to invade Canada in War Plan Red (external - login to view), albeit as an academic exercise. Canadian defence was organized against an American invasion until the onset of World War II (external - login to view).
Following co-operation in the two World Wars, Canada and the United States lost much of their previous animosity. As Britain's influence as a global superpower declined, Canada and the United States became extremely close partners. Canada was a close ally of the United States during the Cold War (external - login to view).
The Canadian military has fought along side the U.S. in most major wars since World War II, including the Korean War (external - login to view), the Gulf War (external - login to view), the Kosovo War (external - login to view), and most recently, the war in Afghanistan (external - login to view). The main exceptions to this were the Canadian government's opposition to the Vietnam War (external - login to view) and the Iraq War (external - login to view), which caused some brief diplomatic tensions. Despite these issues, military relations have remained close.
 
PsyOp
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by NorthboyView Post

Two Brothers haggling, one Rich and Proud, one Wealthy and Wise.
But those who think they're wise are foolish indeed....Canada needs some tweaking, but it's my home.

Great post.
 
PsyOp
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

I wonder if those million or so Iraqi fatalities were depending on the U.S.?

They was. one for ten


Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Defence against whom?

Everybody
 
PsyOp
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by NightmareView Post

Hey,
I'm trying to do this project and I need your help.
I'm have this poll, so please don't mess it up.
Thanks a lot!!!

For you project. I think you can finish it like this:

The arm of the space shuttle was surely not a coincidence. At least not for God.
 
vinod1975
#19
ok i will not ...
 
Northboy
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by PsyOpView Post

For you project. I think you can finish it like this:

The arm of the space shuttle was surely not a coincidence. At least not for God.

Wisdom here..
 
RomSpaceKnight
#21
Canada depends on the US only so far as a supplier depends on his cutomers. Beyond a somewhat shared history on this continent our relationship with the US is about trade. We are a resources based economy for the most part and the US is our biggest trading partner. Culturally and in foreign affairs we are quite able to hold our own.
 
L Gilbert
#22
Do you think Canada is depending on USA? (external - login to view)

For what?
No specifics are given so I'd have to say yes and no.
 
#juan
#23
Canada and the U.S. are each other's biggest customer with $1.3 billion in trade between the two countries every day. Both countries are locked into this trade because other countries would have trouble competing in this market because of shipping costs.

Canada and the U.S. have been allied in three major wars, but not Iraq, or VietNam, (thank God..)

Until recently, the Canada/U.S. border has not been defended, but that is changing. It is not so much Canada depending on the U.S., as the U.S. wanting to make us dependent. There is no love in Canada's business dealings with the U.S.. Both countries want to buy low and sell high like any other country in the world.
 
Nightmare
#24
Hey,

My topic is "Is Canada Depending On The U.S?".
It has to include a Powerpoint Presentation with Issues, Pros, and Cons, etc.

Can you please also list the website you got it from so I can back it up?

Thanks A lot!
 
Nightmare
#25
The question means that "Is Canada Depending On The U.S?" generally. (Defence, Trade, etc)
 
Alexander
#26
I think we depend on eachother. The US provides defense for us and we provide electricity and soft wood for them. The main question is "do we depend on the US" and so I said yes, because there are some things that they contribute. If the question was who benefits more from our free trade system I would definately say the US is screwing us over.
 
talloola
#27
The only aspect of our country that would have to make a significant change if u.s. were to disappear,
would be our military, but not by that much, our position in the world isn't "that" strong, and I don't
see other countries in the world chomping at the bit to take us on, and I think our style would do
quite well on its own in the world, and we would not be vulnerable to the onslot of others, but we could
be very helpful to others who need it.

Our country wasn't a spin-off of the u.s. we are made up from a completely different cut of cloth.
Our government is a parliamentary one, and we do business in our own way.

Of course the world is getting smaller all the time, and we all know so much about each other than
a few years ago, but again, we have our own identity, even though we live in a very similar way to
those in the u.s. We are all priviledged in the west, and we are very independent and strong in our
own way, and very respected around the world.
 
Nightmare
#28
Hey all,

Thanks for all thie information, but without the bibliography or a reliable source, I can't put it in my project.
 
Nightmare
#29
You could also think the question as "Do we depend of U.S?" or "Do we need them"
 
Nightmare
#30
People I really need your help...

Please...
 

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