Small sample from article


Researcher87
#1
Residential schools were erected by the Canadian government in the 19th century and they were designed to ‘educate’ the aboriginal people of Canada so their status could be raised to that of their fellow ‘European’ Canadians, wherein they would be competitive in the Canadian workforce. The idea behind Residential schools fits nicely into the ideology of that century, where those people who were ‘better off’ had a moral obligation to assist those less fortunate. This is expressed by XXX That was the apparent motivation whereby Canada created the Residential school system all across Canada. In the nearly one hundred years that this system was in operation, it took in nearly one hundred thousand to nearly two hundred thousand aboriginal children. Examining this idea further, the question may be raised as to why Residential schools have been condemned in most literature as places of abuse, neglect, and violence.


Indeed, for example, as Kevin Annett states in his book Hidden from history: the Canadian Holocaust (2005), many of these aboriginal children had to deal with extreme hardships, including being taken from their families, the stark accommodations at these schools, and the abuse inflicted by the Christian nuns, priests and other church staff who ran these Residential schools. Annett (2005) saw them as “unsafe, violent, and unhealthy physical environment, substandard, contaminated and rancid food, … permanent isolation from family and friends (and finally) physical, sexual, emotional and mental abuse”1 (p. 95). In fact, Residential schools did not provide a good ‘education’ to aboriginal children and, if aboriginal children were taught anything, they were taught such rudimentary skills that ensured they would remain “on the lower fringes of the dominant society”2 (Ann Pohl, 2005).


However, on the other hand, there are instances where Residential schools appear to have been beneficial for some of these aboriginal children, where they were actually ‘taught’ valuable skills and information within their walls. This article will highlight instances where Residential schools were a horrible holocaust for its aboriginal inhabitants as well as instances where Residential schools appear to have been a benevolent experience at the behest of the moral majority of Canada and its government. The main impetus of this article is to help determine if the aboriginal peoples caught up in the Residential schools system were able to retain their indigenous traditions and culture, even during the height of their residential schooling, which, in many case, was motivated by an ‘assimilation’ policy. This policy was outlined by XXX the church staff that ran the schools and the Indian Affairs officials desired in Ottawa.


In fact, however, some Residential school officials in at least some of the schools actually took an interest in aboriginal culture and were not overly keen in the ‘assimilation’ doctrine handed down by the Government of Canada and the church officials responsible for these Residential schools. Apparently, one such school was St. George in Lytton, British Columbia where, according to the supervisor , theirs was a mutual learning experience with their young male aboriginal charges. Indeed, this supervisor implied that it was he who was learning from the aboriginal children rather than the other way around. As stated, “I was introduced to the choicest delicacies according to Indian palates, taught to hunt and fish productively …and a thorough grounding on how to live and let live according to the Indians’ point of view”3 (Purvis, R. 1994, pp.7-. Sadly, however, aboriginal children in other Residential schools were reportedly beaten, harassed and humiliated if they spoke their language or partook in any aboriginal ceremonies.
 
Said1
#2
Has your submission been confirmed?
 
Researcher87
#3
Not done or complete yet. Have only written about 10 pages and three more pages for figures. And with those that equal two pages, that is editing I will have to do to fill some stuff in before continuing. So as i work to fill that stuff in that may be another page or so I am working on the rest of the article.
 
Said1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Researcher87View Post

Not done or complete yet. Have only written about 10 pages and three more pages for figures. And with those that equal two pages, that is editing I will have to do to fill some stuff in before continuing. So as i work to fill that stuff in that may be another page or so I am working on the rest of the article.


Where are you planning to send it for publication or is this just for pesonal experience?
 
Researcher87
#5
I'm hopping to send it to Native Studies Review or a Historical Journal.
 
Said1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Researcher87View Post

I'm hopping to send it to Native Studies Review or a Historical Journal.


If you're planning submisson to those publications, you will need to add more references, especially when you're claiming things to be fact and using numbers and statistics. You need to do this even if you're using your own words.
 
Researcher87
#7
Quote:

If you're planning submisson to those publications, you will need to add more references, especially when you're claiming things to be fact and using numbers and statistics. You need to do this even if you're using your own words.

Thats only a sample. However, I do have 24 footnotes or sources for about 10 pages.
 
Researcher87
#8
I don't think this is too right-wing or left-wing. I think it is objective.
 
Dexter Sinister
#9
That sample of the article is really too small to decide if it's too left or right wing. It certainly doesn't appear to be from that little bit, but so far only you know what you're going to say next or what you're going to conclude. I've been trying to track down a source that bears on this ever since I learned here that you're writing this thing, so I could share it with you, but without any success. It was a tv program I saw a few years ago on the local community access cable channel here in Regina, a tape of a public lecture given by a scholar at the University of Regina. Unfortunately my schedule that day didn't permit me to see the beginning or end of it, so I didn't get his name, pretty much all I can remember is that he was a middle-aged guy who was very articulate and very offended about it all, and fielded questions from the audience with grace and wit. I also remember him quoting from correspondence written by assorted federal agents responsible for dealing with aboriginals at the time, and clearly demonstrating how violence and abuse were built into the system from the start, that there was never any doubt that the residential schools project was about cultural destruction and replacement. They called it education and assimilation, and I suppose according to the mores of the time they believed they were trying to do the right thing, but the execution was horrible.

I'm sure I'd recognize a picture of that guy if I saw one, but the UoR doesn't post pictures of its staff or visiting scholars, and that's really all I had to go on. There might be somebody at the tv channel who can help--it's Community Access Channel 7 in Regina--so I'll write to them to see if anybody can help me, and you. But I don't really hold out much hope, I have so little information to guide them.

Damn, I felt at the time that I should have paid more attention to that program...
 

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