Do you have a favorite poem or quote, or line?


selfactivated
#61
"The wound of words is worse than the wound of swords."
-- Saudi Arabian Proverb

"A broken bone can heal, but the wound a word opens can fester forever."
-- Jessamyn West
 
dekhqonbacha
#62
"People don't plan to fail. They fail to plan."
 
dekhqonbacha
#63
"You never fail, until you stop trying."
 
Zan
#64
"All joys, pleasures and miseries have their origin in the mind. It is for each one of us to decide whether we wire ourselves for happiness or misery..."

"...... it is not others who are bothering you. It is only your own self wallowing in misery."

Joginder Singh
 
selfactivated
#65
Little minds mistake little objects for great ones, and lavish away upon the former that time and attention which only the latter deserve. To such mistakes we owe the numerous and frivolous tribe of insect-mongers, shell-mongers, and pursuers and driers of butterflies, etc. The strong mind distinguishes, not only between the useful and the useless, but likewise between the useful and the curious.

(Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Dec. 6, 1748, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. II, p. 112, London (1774).)
More quotations from: 4th Earl Chesterfield, Philip Dormer Stanhope
 
selfactivated
#66
Come, let's away to prison.
We two alone will sing like birds i' the cage.
When thou dost ask me blessing, I'll kneel down
And ask of thee forgiveness. So we'll live,
And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh
At gilded butterflies, and hear poor rogues
Talk of court news; and we'll talk with them too—
Who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out—
And take upon 's the mystery of things,
As if we were God's spies; and we'll wear out,
In a walled prison, packs and sects of great ones,
That ebb and flow by the moon.

(William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Lear (V, iii). to his daughter Cordelia when they are taken prisoners. OHFP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.)
More quotations from: William Shakespeare
 
selfactivated
#67
Call To The Four Sacred Winds
By Spirit Wind (Pat Poland)



I call to the East, where the Father ascends
to all Mother Earth where life begins.
I fly through the cedars, pines, willows, and birch
as animals below me wander and search.

I call to the South, to the land down below.
Turtle stands silent, as man strings his bow
to hunt food and fur for his kin before snow.
A life will end so others will grow.

I call to the North, that yansa once knew.
I follow their path til it disappears from view.
Once vast in number, there stand but a few.
I hear only ghost thunder of millions of hooves.

I call to the West, to the ends of the lands,
to the Tsalagi, Kiowa, Comanche ... all bands.
Unite for the strength. Teach the young and demand
that you are Native Americans. Learn your tongue and stand.

My name is Freedom... I fly through this land.
I call to the Four Sacred Winds of Turtle Island.
 
selfactivated
#68
"Everyone believes very easily whatever they fear or desire."
-- Jean de La Fontaine
 
selfactivated
#69
"Thousands of candles
can be lighted from a single candle,
and the life of the candle
will not be shortened.
Happiness never decreases by being shared."
-- Buddha
 
selfactivated
#70
"The human story does not always unfold
like a mathematical calculation on the principle
that two and two make four.
Sometimes in life they make five or minus three;
and sometimes the blackboard topples down
in the middle of the sum
and leaves the class in disorder
and the pedagogue with a black eye."
-- Winston Churchill
 
selfactivated
#71
All loss, all pain, is particular; the universe remains to the heart unhurt.

(Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882),
 
gc
#72
"If you see someone without a smile, give them one of yours"

-Author unknown
 
selfactivated
#73
Quote: Originally Posted by gcView Post

"If you see someone without a smile, give them one of yours"

-Author unknown

“In character, in manners, in style, in all things, the supreme excellence is simplicity.”

-Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)
 
maepaulino
#74
here's a quote...

Quote:

'Tis better to try and to fail than to fail to try and forever experience the inestimable loss of what might have been.

and

Quote:

I shall pass through this road but once, any good that I can do, or kindness that I can show, let me do it now for I shall never pass this way again.

 
MattUK
#75
"The known is finite, the unknown is infinite; intellectually we stand on an islet in the midst of an illimitable ocean of inexplicability. Our business in every generation is to reclaim a little more land." - T.H. Huxley, 1887.
 
selfactivated
#76
Real loss only occurs when you lose something that you love more than yourself (external - login to view)
 
selfactivated
#77
When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight. ~Kahlil Gibran
 
Said1
#78
I'm pretty sure Martin Luther King jr said this, I love it anyway. It goes something like this 'we ain't what we oughtta be, we ain't what we wanna be, but thank God we ain't what we was'. Simple, to the point an no need for a dictionary.
 
Said1
#79
And one more 'be the person your dog thinks you are'. My dog is rude to me sometimes, so I'm not so sure how literal I want to take this.
 
Sassylassie
#80
Robert Frost, one of my favs.

No orchard's the worse for the winteriest storm;
But one thing about it, it mustn't get warm,
"How often already you're had to be told, Keep cold young orchard, goodbye and keep cold.
Dread fifty above more than fity below"
I have to gone be for a season or so.

I wish I could promise to lie in the night and think of an Orchards' arboreal plight.
When slowly (and nobody comes with a light) Its heart sinks lower under ths sod.
But something has to be left to God.
"Good bye and keep cold".
 
selfactivated
#81
Memory is a way of holding onto the things you love, the things you are, the things you never want to lose. ~From the television show The Wonder Years
 
selfactivated
#82
Quote: Originally Posted by SassylassieView Post

Robert Frost, one of my favs.

No orchard's the worse for the winteriest storm;
But one thing about it, it mustn't get warm,
"How often already you're had to be told, Keep cold young orchard, goodbye and keep cold.
Dread fifty above more than fity below"
I have to gone be for a season or so.

I wish I could promise to lie in the night and think of an Orchards' arboreal plight.
When slowly (and nobody comes with a light) Its heart sinks lower under ths sod.
But something has to be left to God.
"Good bye and keep cold".



Oh Sassy *tears*
 
selfactivated
#83
"A candle loses none of its light by lighting another candle."

~Author:Unknown~
 
CDNBear
#84
I kinda like this one, then again I wrote it. I think what happend on flight 93, was the most glaring example of "Stand and Deliver" I've ever seen by civilians, and this was my tribute to them.
It's not the greatest, but then again I'm more of a editorial/opinion based writer then a poet.

Hockey cards flapping against my spokes
Group giggles at now seemingly silly jokes
Mounting our pedal bikes just like Troopers
I can only imagine all the stupid bloopers
Come on guys, Lets Roll
Oh how we wailed and we wined
While on the summer sun our hearts dined
I'm sure we said a lot of things
I know we looked like ding-a-lings
Come on guys, Lets Roll
The simple summer sun is gone
We entered the world in adult dawn
That childs innocence and grace
It was another time another place
Come on guys, Lets Roll
Just a silly term from my childhood
In age, it made no sence as you think it would
Then all the world changed
At the hands of evil and deranged
Come on guys lets Roll
Innocuos words from years gone by
said in strength, streaked across the sky
Like Troopers they took a stand
Life and Liberty they would demand
Come on guys, Lets Roll
A day in our minds for ever more
Burned in fire and in gore
A lot said, a lot was done
Yet the children played and they had fun
Come on guys, Lets Roll
 
selfactivated
#85
Thank you for sharing your poem I enjoyed it.
This one is one of mine I write a great deal poetry and prose.
Oh Willow
Oh Willow my Willow I feel your tears
Oh Willow my Willow he's been gone for years.

Once apon a time you were flesh and blood
Smiling at the Universe, smelling a rose bud.

His charm soothed your soul, his eyes stole your heart
His hand you did take, on a jouney you impart.

Such joy, such glee you felt with each touch.
The stroke of his hand on your cheek was ne'r to much.

A heaven on earth you both did create.
He was yours and you were his forever soulmates.

Until one fated day his worldly journey did end.
Leaving you with lamenting and mourning for you to contend.

The Faes took pity they felt your plight.
The sent to you their deepest magical light.

Upon your tears they bestowed green leaves.
As long and as tender as the love you believed.

Oh Willow my Willow I feel your tears
Oh Willow my Willow he's been gone for years.
 
#juan
#86
This is from that pirate movie:

"I am the very model of a modern Major- General,
I've information vegetable, animal and mineral,
I know the kings of England, and I quote their fights historical,
From Marathon to Waterloo, in order catagorical;
I'm well aquainted, too, with matters mathematical,
I understand equations, both the simple and quadratical,
about binomial theorem I''m teeming with a lot o' news,
with many cheerful facts about the square of the hypotenuse...

There are at least five more verses but I don't have them. Hearing the Major General go through these lines breaks me up every time.
 
selfactivated
#87

NOTABLE LYRICS: Pirates of PenzanceBy Sir William S. Gilbert and Sir Arthur Sullivan

MAJOR GENERAL STANLEY:

I am the very model of a modern Major General,
I've information vegetable, animal, and mineral,
I know the kings of England, and I quote the fights historical
From Marathon to Waterloo, in order categorical;
I'm very well acquainted, too, with matters mathematical,
I understand equations, both the simple and quadratical,
About binomial theorem I'm teeming with a lot o' news,
With many cheerful facts about the square of the hypotenuse.

ALL: With many cheerful facts...
GENERAL STANLEY: I'm very good at integral and differential calculus;
I know the scientific names of beings animalculous:
In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
I am the very model of a modern Major General.

ALL: In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
He is the very model of a modern Major General.

Major General Stanley is yet another example of Gilbert & Sullivan's mockeries of British aristocracy. He demonstrates ability of knowledge in mathematics, history, and literature frequently yet lists no great military victories to his name.

GENERAL STANLEY: I know our mythic history, King Arthur's and Sir Caradoc's;
I answer hard acrostics, I've a pretty taste for paradox,
I quote in elegiacs all the crimes of Heliogabalus,
In conics I can floor peculiarities parabolous;
I can tell undoubted Raphaels from Gerard Dows and Zoffanies,
I know the croaking chorus from the Frogs of Aristophanes!
Then I can hum a fugue of which I've heard the music's din afore,
And whistle all the airs from that infernal nonsense Pinafore.

ALL: And whistle all the airs...

In this verse Gilbert & Sullivan actually mock their previous production, HMS Pinafore, and the nature of its music. Soon after it's release, HMS Pinafore gained widespread popularity with a lasting production time. Particularly noticed was the nature of its music which soon gained reputation as extremely "catchy" and prompting of "whistling."

GENERAL STANLEY: Then I can write a washing bill in Babylonic cuneiform,
And tell you ev'ry detail of Caractacus's uniform:
In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
I am the very model of a modern Major-General.

ALL: In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
He is the very model of a modern Major-General.

Again the General is seen to know the details of historical uniforms and language but no demonstrated skill in battle.
GENERAL STANLEY: In fact, when I know what is meant by "mamelon" and "ravelin",
When I can tell at sight a Mauser rifle from a javelin,
When such affairs as sorties and surprises I'm more wary at,
And when I know precisely what is meant by "commissariat",
When I have learnt what progress has been made in modern gunnery,
When I know more of tactics than a novice in a nunnery
In short, when I've a smattering of elemental strategy,
You'll say a better Major-General has never sat a gee.

ALL: You'll say a better Major-General...
GENERAL STANLEY: For my military knowledge, though I'm plucky and adventury,
Has only been brought down to the beginning of the century;
But still, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
I am the very model of a modern Major-General.

Stanley finally introduces military knowledge in this verse yet it deals more with listing statistics and descriptions of equipment and historical events while strategy "has only been brought down to the beginning of the century."
ALL: But still, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
He is the very model of a modern Major-General.
GENERAL STANLEY: And now that I've introduced myself, I should like to
have some idea of what's going on.

This classic example of witty lyrics on Gilbert's part serves to introduce the grand figure of Major General in a way similar to Sir Joseph's 'When I was a Lad' in HMS Pinafore.


KING: Although our dark career
Sometimes involves the crime of stealing,
We rather think that we're
Not altogether void of feeling.
Although we live by strife,
We're always sorry to begin it,
For what, we ask, is life
Without a touch of Poetry in it?
(all kneel)


ALL: Hail, Poetry, thou heav'n-born maid!
Thou gildest e'en the pirate's trade.
Hail, flowing fount of sentiment!
All hail, all hail, divine emollient!
(all rise)
KING: You may go, for you're at liberty, our pirate rules
protect you,
And honorary members of our band we do elect you!

Gilbert often targets British custom, honor, and nobility through obnoxiously absurd display of it. Here pirates are seen discussing poetry along side the crimes of stealing in a mockery of hypocrisy among the cultured (for the pirates are revealed as former noblemen turned bad).


POLICE SERGEANT

When the foeman bares his steel,
Tarantara! tarantara!
We uncomfortable feel,
Tarantara!
And we find the wisest thing,
Tarantara! tarantara!
Is to slap our chests and sing,
Tarantara!
For when threatened with meutes,
Tarantara! tarantara!
And your heart is in your boots,
Tarantara!
There is nothing brings it round
Like the trumpet's martial sound,
Like the trumpet's martial sound
Tarantara! tarantara!, etc.

MABEL: Go, ye heroes, go to glory,
Though you die in combat gory,
Ye shall live in song and story.
Go to immortality!
Go to death, and go to slaughter;
Die, and every Cornish daughter
With her tears your grave shall water.
Go, ye heroes, go and die!

GIRLS: Go, ye heroes, go and die! Go, ye heroes, go and die!
POLICE: Though to us it's evident,
Tarantara! tarantara!
These attentions are well meant,
Tarantara!
Such expressions don't appear,
Tarantara! tarantara!
Calculated men to cheer
Tarantara!
Who are going to meet their fate
In a highly nervous state.
Tarantara! tarantara! tarantara!
Still to us it's evident
These attentions are well meant.
Tarantara! tarantara! tarantara!

EDITH: Go and do your best endeavour,
And before all links we sever,
We will say farewell for-ever.
Go to glory and the grave!
GIRLS: For your foes are fierce and ruthless,
False, unmerciful, and truthless;
Young and tender, old and toothless,
All in vain their mercy crave.

SERGEANT: We observe too great a stress,
On the risks that on us press,
And of reference a lack
To our chance of coming back.
Still, perhaps it would be wise
Not to carp or criticise,
For it's very evident
These attentions are well meant.
POLICE: Yes, it's very evident
These attentions are well meant,
Evident, yes, well meant, evident
Ah, yes, well meant!

This song serves primarily as a comic device poking fun at cowardice by employing exaggeration. Mabel sings to urge on the police into "death" in battle with the pirates by ordering them to go and "die" heroic deaths. She doesn't stop to notice, though, that the police are a rather nervous group with evident incompetence and an excessive care for order and regulation as guides to action.
 
selfactivated
#88
"In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: It goes on." -- Robert Frost
 
SashaS
#89
Mourn the losses, because they are many, but celebrate the victories, because they are few. - Debbie Novotny
 
tamarin
#90
Saw it in Sports Illustrated in an article on Pat Tillman:

"Fear is what prevents men from living extraordinary lives."
 

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