Emptying Out

I think not
#1
Report: Americans fleeing nation's big cities
People moving further from metropolitan areas in search of cheaper homes



WASHINGTON - Americans are leaving the nation’s big cities in search of cheaper homes and open spaces farther out.

Nearly every large metropolitan area had more people move out than move in from 2000 to 2004, with a few exceptions in the South and Southwest, according to a report being released Thursday by the Census Bureau.

Northeasterners are moving South and West. West Coast residents are moving inland. Midwesterners are chasing better job markets. And just about everywhere, people are escaping to the outer suburbs, also known as exurbs.

“It’s a case of middle class flight, a flight for housing affordability,” said William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution, a Washington think tank. “But it’s not just white middle class flight, it’s Hispanics and blacks, too.”

The Census Bureau measured domestic migration — people moving within the United States — from 1990 to 2000, and from 2000 to 2004. The report provides the number of people moving into and out of each state and the 25 largest metropolitan areas.

The states that attracted the most new residents: Florida, Arizona and Nevada. The states that lost the most: New York, California and Illinois.

Among the 25 largest metropolitan areas, 18 had more people move out than move in from 2000 to 2004. New York, Los Angeles and Chicago — the three biggest metropolitan areas — lost the most residents to domestic moves. The New York metropolitan area had a net loss of more than 210,000 residents a year from 2000 to 2004.



Richard Florida, a professor of public policy at George Mason University, said smaller, wealthier households are replacing larger families in many big metropolitan areas.

That drives up housing prices even as the population shrinks, chasing away even more members of the middle class.

“Because they are bidding up prices, they are forcing some people out to the exurbs and the fringe,” Florida said. “Other people are forced to make moves in response to that. I don’t have any sense of this abating.”

Riverside, Calif. a burgeoning city
The metropolitan area that attracted the most new residents was Riverside, Calif., which has been siphoning residents from Los Angeles for years. The Riverside area, which includes San Bernardino and Ontario, had a net gain of 81,000 people a year from 2000 to 2004.

Riverside has grown to become the 13th largest metropolitan area in the nation. It’s a short drive to several mountain ranges, and it’s within driving distance of the beach. Locally, it is known as the Inland Empire.

“When you look at housing prices in Southern California, along the beaches and coastlines, you’re able to obtain a very large home for a much lower price” in Riverside, said Cindy Roth, president and CEO of the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce.

Homes in Riverside aren’t cheap. The median price — the point at which half cost more and half cost less — was $374,200 in 2005. But they are less expensive than Los Angeles, where the median price was $529,000.

Other areas that attracted a lot of new residents also have relatively inexpensive homes, even if they are not the cheapest in the country. Phoenix, Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fla., Atlanta and Dallas-Fort Worth round out the top five metropolitan areas.
 
Said1
#2
I know it's REALLY bad now, but hasn't that always been the case. That is the city is always way more expensive? It doesn't seem to matter where anyone goes these days, it's high all over!
 
I think not
#3
Not really Said1. My sister recently went to West Virginia on a business trip, the houses there cost alot less than in NY. Something on the order of 5000 square feet was selling for about $150,000. The joke was, buy one get one free. That's how much cheaper they are elsewhere.
 
Toro
#4
Real estate prices are absolutely stupid.
 
fuzzylogix
#5
Yeah but commuting sucks. I cant imagine spending two hours each way each day to get to work. What is the point. As for housing prices, I saw one of those W5 shows on Silicone valley where people were paying 800,000 for a two bedroom cottage and thinking they were lucky to get such a great deal!
 
zoofer
#6
You have to go where the jobs are unless you are retired or independently wealthy.
Inner cities are becoming unlivable where crime is rampant and there is a scarcity of golf courses.
 
Said1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not

Not really Said1. My sister recently went to West Virginia on a business trip, the houses there cost alot less than in NY. Something on the order of 5000 square feet was selling for about $150,000. The joke was, buy one get one free. That's how much cheaper they are elsewhere.

My point is that regardless of local, the city is always more expensive. Although that varies from place to place,from what I've seen all places are unusually high, for their areas, even though one region might be cheaper than another.....ba-dum-bump. I'm not sure I understand what I just wrote either....I'm guessing you'll figure it out.
 
I think not
#8
I think it depends on the commodity involved. Gas for example (&@*# @()@# $)@_$ @$ @_!_*#~!). New York City averages at the moment around $2.80 a gallon, further out on the island it's higher.
 
pastafarian
#9
Quote:

Silicone valley

Hey, is that where Pamela Anderson lives?? :P
 
Said1
#10
Quite doggin on poor Pammy!
 
fuzzylogix
#11
LOL!!!!! No, Im completely real-----no leaking lumpy gritty calcified crap in me!!!!!
 
tracy
#12
Your gas is cheaper than ours ITN.

I am actually working in the Inland Empire, but I still live in LA county. I am never moving Inland. I don't care how much cheaper the rent is. It's lame out there.
 
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