How was your St. Paddies Day?


Amik
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by Jay

Drink four or five of those and it won't matter anymore what they serve you as long as there is booze in it...Great!

In the end, being the enterprising Irishwoman that I am, that is exactly what I did. In fact isn't that what St Patrick's day is? Making every St Paddy's day the worst one ever, no matter what horrible circumstances you're in?
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not

I gotta hand it to you Blackleaf, if I said half the snobby crap you post I would of been spending all day arguing with people, with you however, they either seem to agree Brits are the best thing that ever happened to humanity, or, they are just ignoring you.

The English are wonderful, they're the most civilized and self-effacing people, and are not prone to posturing and preening.

Blackleaf, on the other hand, is quite the enigma. I find his constant boasting and contempt for anything not English to be more typical of a highly insecure child than an adult, yet obviously our Blackleaf isn't an insecure child.

That leaves only one other possibility: he is just being funny. That's how I interpret his posts now, as a good bit of sardonic wit, so subtle as to almost pass as serious. Since then, I find his posts infinitely more enjoyable to read.
 
Jay
#33
Are you English by any chance Haggis?
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#34
Canadian, Jay, with a solid Scottish background. My family on my mother's side was pretty anti-English, but I am not.
 
tracy
#35
I spent it at work unfortunately. I wore green, including my St Patricks day tiara (green with sparkles and some clovers on it). The baby's seemed to love it, but the other nurses mostly ignored it. We had a belated St Patricks day celebration on Sunday, but had it in a Mexican restaurant... So, I proposed that we go to an Irish pub for Cinqo de mayo or whatever it's called.
 
Blackleaf
#36
Quote:

My family on my mother's side was pretty anti-English, but I am not.

So you have a racist family?
 
Blackleaf
#37
There should be a new flag for the English people. One that has the White English dragon on it.


"Moves are now under way to once again raise the White Dragon flag, not as the flag of England, but as the flag of the ethnic-English community within England. We need to see our banner flown as a signal to everyone else that although we may well have been forgotten about by our beloved leaders we most certainly have not gone away and we are once again finding our voice."



The White Dragon Flag of the English


This would be similar to the Red Dragon flag of the Welsh -



The English have the White Dragon and the Welsh have the Red Dragon because when the Anglo-Saxon armies fought the Celts, the Anglo-Saxons carried banners with white dragons on them and the Celts carried banners with red dragons on them.





The years around 450 AD witnessed the landing, in what was then Celtic Britain, of the first Anglo-Saxon war bands who were to go on and lay the foundation stones of what was to become the English Nation. Two of these warrior traders, Hengest and Horsa, together with their Saxon, Angle and Jutish followers are traditionally regarded as the founders of England. From the coast they gradually pushed inland up the rivers with small squadrons of ships whose crews became the founders of new communities as they advanced from East to West through Celtic Britain.During the next four centuries, the Saxon, Angle and Juttish settlers together with the northern Vikings, would become known collectively as the English. History records that the White Dragon was their emblem.


Various accounts of the times record many battles between armies carrying the Celtic British Red Dragon Banner (now the Welsh Dragon) and the white dragon flag of the early English. Legend has it that the defeat of their Celtic enemies by the early English was foretold in a prophecy. It goes that in an underground lake slept two dragons. The Britons were represented by a red dragon and the English by a white dragon. When they awoke they started fighting and the red dragon was overcome by the white one, symbolically representing the victory of the Anglo-Saxons over their Celtic adversaries.


The White Dragon was the emblem of Wessex, the territory of the West Saxons. It is the banner under which King Alfred the Great defeated the great Viking Army at the Battle of Edington and it was the banner carried by the mighty King Athelstan when he smashed the combined armies of the Scots, Welsh, Norse and Irish at the Battle of Brananburgh in 937. The Dragon was flown by Harold II, when he destroyed the Norse army at the Battle of Stamford Bridge in 1066 and it was the banner under which he and his warriors fought to the death, three weeks later protecting their homeland from invasion. The White Dragon flag of the English is shown on the battle scene of the tapestry sewn by Englishwomen to commemorate the battle. It is also seen displayed on the same tapestry featuring a scene at Westminster Abbey during the crowning ceremony for the usurper, William the Bastard.


Moves are now under way to once again raise the White Dragon flag, not as the flag of England, but as the flag of the ethnic-English community within England. We need to see our banner flown as a signal to everyone else that although we may well have been forgotten about by our beloved leaders we most certainly have not gone away and we are once again finding our voice.


In a world with few certainties this flag tells us who we are and from where we have come. It imparts a sense of permanence and continuity. It is a symbol of our identity, our common history, tradition and of the kinship of all the Anglo-Saxon people. It is also a stark reminder that in multi-cultural England unless we embrace these things then we will surely die.


Look for the sign of the White Dragon and you will find a friend….

wearetheenglish.com
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Quote:

My family on my mother's side was pretty anti-English, but I am not.

So you have a racist family?

The English are a 'race'?
 
Blackleaf
#39
If we aren't a race then what are we?
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

If we aren't a race then what are we?

You're quite right, of course. I just never think of humans as anything but human, ie the human race.

Oh, and yes, in the sense you mean, my maternal family was most decidedly racist against the English, to the point of disowning a member of the family simply for having married an Englishman.
 
tracy
#41
Race is a completely made up concept anyways. There is no scientific basis to it.
 
cortez
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Another reason why St Patrick's Day annoys me is that not only do people with no connections with Ireland whatsoever celebrate it, but there's so much green around that it looks like a lot of people have sneezed everywhere.

For shame Blackleaf, you yourself reminded us all that St. Paddie was an Englishman, and therefore all you English lot should be required to go and celebrate the accolades of your countryman..
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#43
Quote: Originally Posted by tracy

Race is a completely made up concept anyways. There is no scientific basis to it.

I agree, which is why I tend to think of 'race' as the human race, to include all.
 
#juan
#44
What can I say?

They celebrate St. Patrick's Day on my birthday.
 
Blackleaf
#45
Quote: Originally Posted by Haggis McBagpipe

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

If we aren't a race then what are we?

You're quite right, of course. I just never think of humans as anything but human, ie the human race.

Oh, and yes, in the sense you mean, my maternal family was most decidedly racist against the English, to the point of disowning a member of the family simply for having married an Englishman.

That was silly. Englishmen are much better looking that Scottish men.

Ginger hair and hairy bodies aren't very attractive.
 
Blackleaf
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by cortez

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Another reason why St Patrick's Day annoys me is that not only do people with no connections with Ireland whatsoever celebrate it, but there's so much green around that it looks like a lot of people have sneezed everywhere.

For shame Blackleaf, you yourself reminded us all that St. Paddie was an Englishman, and therefore all you English lot should be required to go and celebrate the accolades of your countryman..

No. We just leave the rest of the world to do that on St Patrick's Day.
 
missile
#47
The other English Saint,Norbert, was better known for his episodes of flatulence during prayer meetings. He would clear the Abbey with just one good 'un :P
 
Blackleaf
#48
Cool.

That's one of the things I like about English history. It involves a lot of blood and guts - people being hanged, drawn and quartered; people being beheaded; people being burned at the stake; people dying of the plague or of cholera; and the odd disgusting character, such as a certain duke who lived in the South of England who liked eating food such as mice on toast or rats with marmalade. And that guy Norbert, if he was real, who liked to fart during prayer meetings. That's what makes English history so interesting.
 
missile
#49
I'm serious here now in that there is not one inch of England that has not been the site of something of historical value, or even more interesting..the site of something mystical[King Arthur or R obin Hood,etc]
 
Blackleaf
#50
Probably.

Not far from where I live, there is a hill in Alderley Edge in Cheshire and, buried within in are, are supposedly King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table along with their huge, white horses. But they aren't dead. They are only sleeping. And legend has it that they will awaken whenever Britain is in serious danger and help to defend her.

Although why they failed to awaken in 1939 is something of a mystery.
 
missile
#51
That's an easy one They knew the RAF would do the trick. I used to love those stories of the Romans fighting the Picts, then came the realization that my ancestors were Picts I have a beautiful copy of Mallory's "Morte De Arthur" and grew up on such TV programs as Robin Hood,Lancelot. And,yes, I even believe that due to English theorists-we have computors,etc.
 
cortez
#52
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Quote: Originally Posted by cortez

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Another reason why St Patrick's Day annoys me is that not only do people with no connections with Ireland whatsoever celebrate it, but there's so much green around that it looks like a lot of people have sneezed everywhere.

For shame Blackleaf, you yourself reminded us all that St. Paddie was an Englishman, and therefore all you English lot should be required to go and celebrate the accolades of your countryman..

No. We just leave the rest of the world to do that on St Patrick's Day.

Well, old chap, stiff upper lip, and all that....dont worry, well have a few extra brews for ya.... after all, we couldnt have the English running around ENJOYING life and creating obscene scenes of debauchery.....
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#53
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Quote: Originally Posted by Haggis McBagpipe

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

If we aren't a race then what are we?

You're quite right, of course. I just never think of humans as anything but human, ie the human race.

Oh, and yes, in the sense you mean, my maternal family was most decidedly racist against the English, to the point of disowning a member of the family simply for having married an Englishman.

That was silly. Englishmen are much better looking that Scottish men.

Ginger hair and hairy bodies aren't very attractive.

I think we Scots are genetically geared to love the ginger hair and hairy bods. Then again, I also find the English to be a delight. I suppose if the old guard of my family was still around, I'd be disowned for voicing such a view, but there you have it.
 
tracy
#54
Hey! What's wrong with ginger hair? I've never had a guy tell me mine was unattractive... course, I don't have a hairy body so maybe that's the difference...
 
Blackleaf
#55
Quote: Originally Posted by Haggis McBagpipe

Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafQuote: Originally Posted by Haggis McBagpipeQuote: Originally Posted by BlackleafIf we aren't a race then what are we?You're quite right, of course. I just never think of humans as anything but human, ie the human race.
Oh, and yes, in the sense you mean, my maternal family was most decidedly racist against the English, to the point of disowning a member of the family simply for having married an Englishman.That was silly. Englishmen are much better looking that Scottish men.
Ginger hair and hairy bodies aren't very attractive. I think we Scots are genetically geared to love the ginger hair and hairy bods. Then again, I also find the English to be a delight. I suppose if the old guard of my family was still around, I'd be disowned for voicing such a view, but there you have it.

Quote has been trimmed
You aren't Scottish. You're American or Canadian.
 
Blackleaf
#56
Quote: Originally Posted by cortez

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Quote: Originally Posted by cortez

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Another reason why St Patrick's Day annoys me is that not only do people with no connections with Ireland whatsoever celebrate it, but there's so much green around that it looks like a lot of people have sneezed everywhere.

For shame Blackleaf, you yourself reminded us all that St. Paddie was an Englishman, and therefore all you English lot should be required to go and celebrate the accolades of your countryman..

No. We just leave the rest of the world to do that on St Patrick's Day.

Well, old chap, stiff upper lip, and all that....dont worry, well have a few extra brews for ya.... after all, we couldnt have the English running around ENJOYING life and creating obscene scenes of debauchery.....

You can't enjoy life drinking Guinness.

It looks, and tastes, like water from the Thames.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#57
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

You aren't Scottish. You're American or Canadian.

Hey, thanks for letting me know, the mystery has been solved. What would I do without you, Blackleaf. . . .
 
Blackleaf
#58
St Patrick was English and some Irish people seemed to not like him very much. He was held prisoner by a group of Paddies as they attacked his estate. But (like all good Englishman have done all over the world) he tried to civilise the Irish by converting them from their own fake religions to Christianity -



Who Was St. Patrick?


St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is one of Christianity's most widely known figures. But for all his celebrity, his life remains somewhat of a mystery. Many of the stories traditionally associated with St. Patrick, including the famous account of his banishing all the snakes from Ireland, are false, the products of hundreds of years of exaggerated storytelling.

Taken Prisoner By Irish Raiders
It is known that St. Patrick was born in Britain to wealthy parents near the end of the fourth century. He is believed to have died on March 17, around 460 A.D. Although his father was a Christian deacon, it has been suggested that he probably took on the role because of tax incentives and there is no evidence that Patrick came from a particularly religious family. At the age of sixteen, Patrick was taken prisoner by a group of Irish raiders who were attacking his family's estate. They transported him to Ireland where he spent six years in captivity. (There is some dispute over where this captivity took place. Although many believe he was taken to live in Mount Slemish in County Antrim, it is more likely that he was held in County Mayo near Killala.) During this time, he worked as a shepherd, outdoors and away from people. Lonely and afraid, he turned to his religion for solace, becoming a devout Christian. (It is also believed that Patrick first began to dream of converting the Irish people to Christianity during his captivity.)

Guided By Visions
After more than six years as a prisoner, Patrick escaped. According to his writing, a voice—which he believed to be God's—spoke to him in a dream, telling him it was time to leave Ireland.

To do so, Patrick walked nearly 200 miles from County Mayo, where it is believed he was held, to the Irish coast. After escaping to Britain, Patrick reported that he experienced a second revelation—an angel in a dream tells him to return to Ireland as a missionary. Soon after, Patrick began religious training, a course of study that lasted more than fifteen years. After his ordination as a priest, he was sent to Ireland with a dual mission—to minister to Christians already living in Ireland and to begin to convert the Irish. (Interestingly, this mission contradicts the widely held notion that Patrick introduced Christianity to Ireland.)

historychannel.com
 
Blackleaf
#59
Quote: Originally Posted by Haggis McBagpipe

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

You aren't Scottish. You're American or Canadian.

Hey, thanks for letting me know, the mystery has been solved. What would I do without you, Blackleaf. . . .

You told one person you are American then, a few posts above this one, you said you are Scottish and now you are saying you are American.

Aren't you a little confused?

I wonder why Americans have to be so insecure about their nationality that they have to say they are Irish or Scottish even though the only connection they have to those two nations is that their grandparents or great-grandparents came from there.
 
Blackleaf
#60
Quote: Originally Posted by Jay

We all know Blackleaf is just jealous of every other thing out there that isn't British. These days the Brits have stooped low enough to being jealous of the Irish.

If anyone's jealous of the Irish, it's the Americans.

It's Americans who pretend to be Irish because they feel so insecure about being American.

The English, who are not isnecure about their nationality, never pretend to be anything that we aren't.

And why should I be jealous to be Irish? The Irish aren't the "angels" that you think they are.

I bet you didn't know that the Republic of Ireland is the only country in the world, apart from Japan, to have opened a book of condolences for its politicians to sign when Adolf Hitler died. The Irish may have been neutral during the war, but they all secretly supported the Nazis.

I also bet you didn't know that during WWI some Irish nationalists tried to get the Germans to invade Ireland, ALL of which was then a part of Britain, in the hope that by being invaded from Germany it would enable Ireland to leave Britain (although then they would be ruled by Germany instead).

During WWII, they also made it difficult for the American Navy and Royal Navy against the Germans for not allowing our ships to dock in Ireland.
 
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