Welsh and Germans beat the French in cooking competition.


Blackleaf
#1
In yet another boost for British cooking (in 2005, there were more British restaurants in the world's Top 500 than those from any other nation) the Welsh (British) and the Germans beat the French in an international cookery competition.

In fact, the French were not very popular with the judges -

French chefs feel the heat as Welsh and Germans beat them in international contest

Steven Morris
Friday February 24, 2006
The Guardian


The result will not go down well in the restaurants of Paris, and the brasseries of Biarritz will be rocked by the news. After three decades of declining to compete in international culinary competitions a French team stepped back into the arena yesterday - and finished a dispiriting last behind Germany and Wales, countries not always associated with haute cuisine.

Determined to make a good impression at a contest in north Wales, France had put up five of its most respected chefs.

But the judges were underwhelmed by their skills, describing them as "old fashioned", and did not take too kindly to their laid-back approach to timekeeping.

Nor were they pleased that the French had spent almost double the budget for the competition and prepared some of the more fiddly bits in advance.


The competition, at a college of further education in Colwyn Bay, was a sobering experience for the French. "I just hope it doesn't mean they take offence and drop out again," said one of the judges.

The French have chosen not to put their reputations on the line at contests run by the World Association of Cooks Societies since 1978.

Other nations compete in international matches, accruing points for a league. Canada is top, with Singapore second and Switzerland third. England is down at 33rd but Wales is a creditable seventh and Scotland sixth. The French have no ranking because they do not compete.

But some of their culinary leaders have decided they ought to return to the international stage, hence the appearance of a team of chefs - touted beforehand as the Thierry Henris of French cooking - in north Wales.

The Welsh and Germans (ranked fourth in the world) had turned in good, solid performances earlier in the week in the three-team contest when they prepared three-course lunches for 75 diners who had paid 25 a head.

Yesterday it was the turn of the French, led by leading Paris chef Bernard Leprince. But they got off to a stumbling start. Their "show plates" were half an hour late for the judges, who said they were not impressed by the team or their old fashioned techniques. "Times have moved on," one judge said. They also spent double the 450 budget.

The Germans and Welsh were awarded gold medals, with the Germans just ahead, and the French received a silver. Mr Leprince was not downhearted. "It was our first competition and we enjoyed it."

guardian.co.uk
 
karra
#2
It truly is the beginning of the decline of the French empire - unions, fanatical muslims, the language in decline - gee, that must really be hard on their liberal arrogance totally reminscent of our very own home grown liberal sense of entitlement - but feed me medium/well roast boeuf, yorkshires, roast Irish apples, overcooked brussel sprouts avec tonnes of gravy anytime!!
 
karra
#3
Rule Britannia, Britannia. . . .
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#4
There's an old saying about British cooking: "Put it back on the burner, dearie . . . it's still got some flavour!"
 
karra
#5
'Tis true Haggis - though I've something similar re sunflower seeds and ovens. . . .
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by karra

'Tis true Haggis - though I've something similar re sunflower seeds and ovens. . . .

Hey, don't be dissing sunflower seeds! Those addictive things are . . . uh-oh, now i'm craving them. Pfff, Karra, thank you SO much, now I am going to spend the rest of the day craving - NEEDING - sunflower seeds.
 
cortez
#7
Now which one of you has tried that chocolate chicken
 
Toro
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by karra

It truly is the beginning of the decline of the French empire - unions, fanatical muslims, the language in decline - gee, that must really be hard on their liberal arrogance totally reminscent of our very own home grown liberal sense of entitlement - but feed me medium/well roast boeuf, yorkshires, roast Irish apples, overcooked brussel sprouts avec tonnes of gravy anytime!!

Well, though I agree with you on those first points Karra - and pretty much everything else you post - it will be a cold day in hell before I'd ever believe that British and German cooking could even be used as a chaser for the worst tequila I could possibly find let alone beat French cooking. I'd serve British cooking to my neighbors dog, but only because it yaps at night and I'm trying to dispose of it.

Steak and kidney pie. Good stuff. Smothered in brown sauce too. Mmmm. Used to have that every day for lunch when I worked off Oxford Street. Of course, if you ran out of "brown sauce" you could also use "red sauce", which, in more culinary creative parts of the world, is usually known as "ketchup".

And what is Welsh food anyways, Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysilio gogogoch stew? Is it like "Canadian food?"
 
missile
#9
I prefer British fare over the oversauced french stuff myself. They may not be the best chefs in the world, but simple food for the common man can't be knocked
 

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