Characterization (Characterization Of A Person)


Jersay
#1
I have seen it here but in a different context, but the characterization of a person based on the colour of their skin, what they look like, their social identity, and their religion is just totally wrong.

WAKE UP PEOPLE, THIS IS HOW WORLD WAR TWO STARTED, BY CHARACTERIZING THE JEWISH RACE

So this is the philosophy that I take to the world. So you have a special ability to me, your a different colouration than me, who cares we are both human beings trying to survive in this messed up world.

Now why can't everyone else be like that.

We have to stop characterizing people as, oh, Black people can run so they should be sprinters, or they are lazy and they only commit crimes.

If you go on that logic, that characterizes all Black people as lazy and stupid and they live on welfare. However, if you watched Global with that shooting in Toronto, who was holding the hand of the young woman, a Foot Locker employee, a Black Foot Locker employee.

So as we ring in the new year, can we all please stop characterizing each other. Because even if is a compliment to another race, it can have consequences.

Thank you

Because we are all human in the end.

Peace out!
 
FiveParadox
#2
Hear, hear!

Nicely said, Jersay.

Stereotyping doesn't help anyone, and if anything, it detracts from one's argument in civil debate, such as should be the case on the Canadian Content boards.
 
the caracal kid
#3
a wonderful idea that has been around for quite some time. It is an idea that is easily applied in an intellectual manner, yet lost in life. Humans are built to identify differences. It is a part of our the survival coding necessary in our ancient ancestors. Think of how you process information when you first see somebody. The automatic process is to classify to determine "freind/foe" (and a few other things).

So how do humans stop being humans?
How do people choose to ignore what is irrelevent?
There are easy answers, but no real easy answers.
So long as a human must compete for position within a social group, or compete for resources with other humans, these characterizations will continue.

Now, of all things we should battle, ignorance is in top spot.
The acceptance of stereotypes without question is dangerous.
We must also work to minimize polarization.

Peace to you too.
 
jimmoyer
#4
Great thread.

These two posts above, absolutely explain
what colors our political debates.

And yes it is difficult to stomach other points of
view without being infuriated.

But are we no better than the leaders we condemn ?

I've often found we citizens, we voyeurs of the news
are no better than our leaders, and so we are the
well from which they drink the water.
 
Jersay
#5
Everyone has made good points. I am just stating how I feel on the issue of catergorization or stereo-typing or racial profiling.

Quote:

So how do humans stop being humans?
How do people choose to ignore what is irrelevent?
There are easy answers, but no real easy answers.
So long as a human must compete for position within a social group, or compete for resources with other humans, these characterizations will continue.

Caracel Kid makes a good point especially with his last comment.

So how can humans stop being human?

I personally take a person for who they are, and don't care about any other characteristics. Just treat a human being as a human being.

However, people may look at characterization and categorization as a tool to compete.

So does anyone have any way we can combat this?
 
jimmoyer
#6
Yep.

COMEDY !!

Our last refuge.
 
Jersay
#7
Comedy

Even though I like comedy very much and it can cheer a person up, I don't know if that would be a final soloution.

Good try though, I would go for Comedy.
 
Curiosity
#8
I would try for...

Understanding - one at a time....

We are overwhelmed when we think of people of other backgrounds and races in large numbers and tend to categorize them as "them/they"....

What we don't realize is that them/they are individuals lumped into these groups of which we are afraid or suspicious or even hostile.

It's difficult to hate someone if you get to know them and what makes them tick....and if they are willing to get to know you.

I have found knowing a person of another race is truly "understood" and "loved as a friend"...when we stop thinking of them in terms of "race" at all.... but as a friend.

Keep it simple....most of us are very much alike...in the basics.
 
Jersay
#9
Quote:

I would try for...

Understanding - one at a time....

We are overwhelmed when we think of people of other backgrounds and races in large numbers and tend to categorize them as "them/they"....

What we don't realize is that them/they are individuals lumped into these groups of which we are afraid or suspicious or even hostile.

It's difficult to hate someone if you get to know them and what makes them tick....and if they are willing to get to know you.

I have found knowing a person of another race is truly "understood" and "loved as a friend"...when we stop thinking of them in terms of "race" at all.... but as a friend.

Keep it simple....most of us are very much alike...in the basics.

That is reasonable. Seeing a person for a person.
 
Jersay
#10
Anyone else?
 
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