Interior Decoration


I think not
#31
Which Carnivorous Plant Are You? (external - login to view)
 
Vanni Fucci
#32


You are
A Sundew!
These are some of the most vicious plants that have ever graced this planet. They come in all shapes and sizes, and are able to survive almost anywhere on land. They may have rosette leaves, branchy leaves or even oval shaped leaves, however all leaves are flat and covered with tiny tentacle like hairs. Each of these hairs is actually a gland which is covered in a dew like substance. When an insect lured by the fragrant and glittering leaf lands upon it, it quickly finds itself stuck fast. Once stuck, insects have been known to rip their own legs off trying to get free. Sometimes the insect is lucky enough to suffocate, having its breathing holes coated in the goo. Other insects don’t die until they are dissolved in the bath of enzymes and acids that is quickly secreted around it. Some drosera even curl their leaves around their prey, to get the most digestive area possible. Despite their violent tendencies, Sundews use their diverse forms to survive almost anywhere.
 
Jay
#33
I got the same one Vanni did.
 
peapod
#34
Blah! aren't you the smarty pants vanni ......Don't nod....murder for a jar of red rum......never odd or even....oozy rat in a sanitary zoo......lisa bonet ate no basil....

Figure that out...bwhahahhaahhaahha!
 
mrmom2
#35
You are
A Cobra Lily!
This extremely attractive plant gains its name because its traps look like cobras about to strike. The Cobra Lily only grows in Northern California and Southern Oregon, in mountainous terrain. It is an inverted pitcher plant, which grows with a slight twist. It has a “tongue” appendage which is coated with very strongly scented nectar. At the top of the tongue is an opening, leading into the hood of the pitcher. Once inside, an insect will be confused by the translucent windows at the top of the hood. Often it will fly into these miniscule windows only to be knocked down to the bottom of the pitcher. It will eventually drown in the water that collects at the bottom of the pitcher. It is still debated as to whether this plant is truly carnivorous, since it has bacteria that help it digest its prey. Interestingly enough, the scent of its nectar is strong enough to lure and capture larger prey, such as Pacific tree frogs.

I like it I can't get the pic to work though
 
Reverend Blair
#36
You are
A Dewy Pine!
This plant is something of an anomaly among carnivorous plants. It is the only one to live in a dry arid place and can live for months without a lot of water. Native to areas of Portugal and Spain, it is found on dry alkaline hills in a Mediterranean climate. From a distance these plants resemble pines, but a closer inspection will reveal that each leaf is covered in little red glands that have a dew like substance clinging to them. The dew smells a great deal like bee honey and will lure many insects. When the insect lands, it finds itself caught in an oily drop and it will struggle to escape. The struggle only helps to pull the liquid free from the gland and as the entrapped insect slides down the leaf, it collects more of the viscous fluid. After that, it drowns and is digested at the base of the plant. If there was ever an unlikely carnivorous plant, the Dewy Pine is it.
 
Vanni Fucci
#37
Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

Blah! aren't you the smarty pants vanni ......Don't nod....murder for a jar of red rum......never odd or even....oozy rat in a sanitary zoo......lisa bonet ate no basil....

Figure that out...bwhahahhaahhaahha!

Able was I ere I saw Elba.
 
Vanni Fucci
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by Jay

I got the same one Vanni did.

Viscious... :P
 
Reverend Blair
#39
Just to get back to interior decoration for a bit....Only one coat to go. Then all I have to do is run a plug for the computer and it's done...I can move the office.
 
Vanni Fucci
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by Reverend Blair

Just to get back to interior decoration for a bit....Only one coat to go. Then all I have to do is run a plug for the computer and it's done...I can move the office.

That's great...can you come over and do my office too? It's a friggin' mess... :P
 
Reverend Blair
#41
Sure, buy some paint and a passel of beer and get all the crap out of the way. Electrical work requires additional beer.
 
Cosmo
#42
You are
A Rainbow Plant!

The Rainbow Plant is a great deal like the sundew, only much less versatile. It makes up for this with a truly seductive display of glittering foliage. It gains its scientific name, byblis, from the goddess of the rainbow. Native to Australia and New Guinea, different varieties do well in different climates. Some prefer hot dry summers while others enjoy hot wet ones. Either way, this plant focuses more of its attention on getting its prey than on digesting it. In fact, scientist have been unable to isolate any particular digestive enzyme on this plant. It is speculated that the Assassin Bug plays a vital role in helping the digestive process, along with several types of fungi.

Interesting... Shell is a sundew. Better watch my step around her! Course I knew that already
 
Cosmo
#43
Geez, guys, if you're that into decorating, come over and unpack boxes for me!
 
Vanni Fucci
#44
Actually, the office can wait...

I found with the spring thaw, that the mudroom on the back of my house has sunk about 4 inches on ten feet...my back door won't close anymore because the damn frame is so out of square...

I've had a couple contractors look at it, and give me an estimate for digging down to pour a couple piles, and put a beam in so they can jack it back up...that an insulate the crawlspace...

$6300 bucks was by far the cheapest quote I could get...

I'd like to say, to hell with them, I don't need a mudroom...it's just that the mudroom is now my kitchen...and on the floor, where it attaches to the main house, it's raised up, and pinches my feet when I go to pour my coffee...
 
mrmom2
#45
6300 dollars I think you have a bunch of thieves visiting you Vanni
 
Vanni Fucci
#46
Yeah...that was the first quote I got...the next two were over 6 grand just to get the piles poured...everything else would have brought the price closer to 8 grand...
 
Reverend Blair
#47
If you're getting piles poured, don't take the cheap quote. $6K is suspiciously cheap for that kind of thing. The $8K ones are more in line. $10K is about average to get it all done. Ho ho...there's some news you didn't want to hear.

As a temporary fix, you may be able to just jack the porch up even and put in a beam resting on deck pads. It isn't a permanent solution, but it can generally be done for the price of materials, beer and seeing your friends get muddy. There are a lot of people in this city who have been living with "temporary fixes" for a very long time. That's what happens when you build a city in a swamp.

Let me know if you need a hand...I have many shovels, saws and hammers. If you have a way of drilling an eight foot pile under your kitchen, and a strong back, I even have a cement mixer.
 
mrmom2
#48
Hey Vanni my uncle has been doing flood restoration in Winnipeg for 30 years I could give him a call and get him to come by and give you another quote or some other ideas.He was doing it on the side but he's retired now from school teaching
 
mrmom2
#49
Did you see the last post Vanni
 
Vanni Fucci
#50
Quote: Originally Posted by mrmom2

Did you see the last post Vanni

Sorry mom...no I didn't see it...

I've got another contractor coming over tomorrow...once I get that quote, I'll let you know, Ok?
 
mrmom2
#51
Sure Vanni My uncle is a very good builder hes built many a house and done a lot of flood repair in your fair city .He was born and raised there
 
Vanni Fucci
#52
Quote: Originally Posted by mrmom2

Sure Vanni My uncle is a very good builder hes built many a house and done a lot of flood repair in your fair city .He was born and raised there

Hey cool...I've done those things too...

Pouring piles is a little beyond my ken though...
 
Reverend Blair
#53
The important thing about pouring piles is knowing how to tie the steel together. If Mom's uncle has been doing flood restoration in this city for 30 years, he probably knows all about that.

What company name does your uncle work under, Mom? I may have run across him in my travels.
 
mrmom2
#54
I'm not sure what name he goes under I'd have to give him a call.I think he got most of his work from the schools he worked in He was a principle of a elementary school when he retired 2 years ago I haven't talked to him for about 6 months
 
Reverend Blair
#55
Man, I would have killed to get something like school work when I was doing renos. That would have cut down massively on running around doing quotes for people who didn't know what they wanted and expected prices from ten year old Bob Vila reruns.
 
mrmom2
#56
I'll tell you what Rev the reno biz got him into early retirement .Not as early as my dad though
 
Reverend Blair
#57
It got me into early arthritis. Actually that would have happened anyway. It made it kind of hard to continue though...you can't really swing a hammer if you can't hang on to the damned thing. On the other hand, now that I can only do it occasionally, it's a hell of a lot more fun.

It is a cool way to make a living, at least if you like building stuff. I always recommend the trades to young people looking for something to do with their lives.
 
mrmom2
#58
Thatts a good call I'm pushing my son to be a millwright good pay and not very many of them left That or a machinist
 
Jay
#59
If he can be a millwright...he might consider mechanical engineer....
 
Reverend Blair
#60
John, the old dead guy across the street, was a machinist. It's a hell of a good trade and you learn a lot about other trades because you are always doing work for them.
 

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