Pine Beetle Discussion thread


Northboy
#1
For many people who have travelled to BC in the past few years the sight of red trees is becoming more and more common.
Current estimates indicate that BC could lose a full 10% of its total forest base and the epidemic is now spreading to Alberta.
Other than the could of would kind of comments, I would appreciate hearing comments on what how individuals believe the impact on communities affected by this problem can be lessened..

Also how do we go about chronicling this so that we can learn in the future..
 
Cosmo
#2
Not knowing a great deal about the problem, Northboy, I'd have to Google it for info but I do wonder if it isn't nature's way of clearing land. Many species (eg. bighorn sheep) require large open areas to live in and nature creates forest fires to provide certain life forms with what they need. I wonder if pine beetle might not be another form of that?

It's so ugly to drive and see these huge clear cuts required to stop the spread of the beetle but sometimes when we mess with old mom nature it causes more problems. Case in point ... the wolves. We killed them off, upset the balance, brought them back, upset the balance again ... on and on.

The question seems to be how we can manage our environment without doing damage.

I could be way off with pine beetle, tho. As I said, I haven't done sufficient research. But I shall.
 
no1important
#3
It could be partly due to Global Warming as the winters are not staying as cold and getting as cold for very long like they used to, which is whats needed to kill the beetles.
 
Ten Packs
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by no1important

It could be partly due to Global Warming as the winters are not staying as cold and getting as cold for very long like they used to, which is whats needed to kill the beetles.

You're exactly right no1 - but we wont be fixing that before the pine beetle problem is horrendous, if you can say it isnt already with a straight face.

Fire up the Stihls, and take 'em down, boys! The beetles burrow around under the bark of the tree, there's no outside application that will touch them. There ain't no other way... sad? yeah, but face the facts.
 
Extrafire
#5
Well, the trees are relatively old, which makes them susceptible to beetle attack. It's a natural cyclical thing, when the boreal forest gets mature, it is vulnerable. Young trees have enough sap flow to repell the bugs unless they are overwhelmed by numbers. For the most part, the mature trees are red, but the young plantations from past clearcuts are still green.

Solution to future problems for forest dependant communities? Very tough one. Prince George is undergoing a major transformation at this time, as the local economy is diversifying more into things like transportation (air and rail) rejuvenated mining sector, and oil, so it won't be hit so hard. For the other forest dependant communitites? Could be rough in a few years.
 
SECONDGEN
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Northboy

For many people who have travelled to BC in the past few years the sight of red trees is becoming more and more common.
Current estimates indicate that BC could lose a full 10% of its total forest base and the epidemic is now spreading to Alberta.
Other than the could of would kind of comments, I would appreciate hearing comments on what how individuals believe the impact on communities affected by this problem can be lessened..

Also how do we go about chronicling this so that we can learn in the future..

And I have to wonder if the forest fires are natures combat against these critters?
 
mrmom2
#7
Nevermind the chainsaws thats whats spreading the bugs One look at our local miil and you can see pine beetle kill in the trees surrounding it Fire they should light the forest up and burn the bastsards it's the only thing that will stop them I've got a buddy thats been at war with those bugs for the last 8 years and they go in the bush and take out infected trees and burn them right in place
 
SECONDGEN
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by mrmom2

Nevermind the chainsaws thats whats spreading the bugs One look at our local miil and you can see pine beetle kill in the trees surrounding it Fire they should light the forest up and burn the bastsards it's the only thing that will stop them I've got a buddy thats been at war with those bugs for the last 8 years and they go in the bush and take out infected trees and burn them right in place

Check back with me in 20 years and I will let you know. Storm mountain, to Kootnaie Crossing all burned out 2 years ago in the great fire of 2003 should be green by then. Pity as 20 years prior to this that area roughly was burned and was just coming into it's own again. It is an obvious cycle.
 
Azalie
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by SECONDGEN

Quote: Originally Posted by Northboy

For many people who have travelled to BC in the past few years the sight of red trees is becoming more and more common.
Current estimates indicate that BC could lose a full 10% of its total forest base and the epidemic is now spreading to Alberta.
Other than the could of would kind of comments, I would appreciate hearing comments on what how individuals believe the impact on communities affected by this problem can be lessened..

Also how do we go about chronicling this so that we can learn in the future..

And I have to wonder if the forest fires are natures combat against these critters?

Forest fires don't actually get under the wood of the tree, for the most part. I mean, they can produce fire scars which causes a triangle shaped lack of bark on one side of the tree (opposite side to where the fire started.. hard to explain in text), but that would only kill som eof the beetles, not the rest.

(studied fire scars in a biology field course)
 
SECONDGEN
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Azalie

Quote: Originally Posted by SECONDGENQuote: Originally Posted by NorthboyFor many people who have travelled to BC in the past few years the sight of red trees is becoming more and more common.
Current estimates indicate that BC could lose a full 10% of its total forest base and the epidemic is now spreading to Alberta.
Other than the could of would kind of comments, I would appreciate hearing comments on what how individuals believe the impact on communities affected by this problem can be lessened..
Also how do we go about chronicling this so that we can learn in the future..And I have to wonder if the forest fires are natures combat against these critters?Forest fires don't actually get under the wood of the tree, for the most part. I mean, they can produce fire scars which causes a triangle shaped lack of bark on one side of the tree (opposite side to where the fire started.. hard to explain in text), but that would only kill som eof the beetles, not the rest.
Well for god sake I feel so ill informed thanks. Ack you mean weapons of mass destruction against beetles is in the future.
(studied fire scars in a biology field course)

Quote has been trimmed
 
mrmom2
#11
It may not get under the bark Azalie But i used to fight fire for a living and the heat generated from the fires will definetly kill them the smoke too
 
mrmom2
#12
It may not get under the bark Azalie But i used to fight fire for a living and the heat generated from the fires will definetly kill them the smoke too
 

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