Words you hate

Dexter Sinister
#61
Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

... I hate when people mix up "despite" and "in spite of". If you're doing something to spite someone, use the latter. If you're doing something irregardless of what someone said, then use the former.

Um... they're not mixing anything up. "In spite of" means without being prevented by, or nothwithstanding, which is exactly what "despite" means. Such as: "George kissed his secretary despite his wife's presence," and "George kissed his secretary in spite of his wife's presence" mean exactly the same thing: the presence of his wife didn't prevent him from doing it. Spite by itself, on the other hand, means ill will or malice: "George kissed his secretary to spite his wife" means he did it to be mean to her.

And one that really bugs me: irregardless. No such word. The word is regardless.
 
Dexter Sinister
#62
Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

... I hate when people mix up "despite" and "in spite of". If you're doing something to spite someone, use the latter. If you're doing something irregardless of what someone said, then use the former.

Um... they're not mixing anything up. "In spite of" means without being prevented by, or nothwithstanding, which is exactly what "despite" means. Such as: "George kissed his secretary despite his wife's presence," and "George kissed his secretary in spite of his wife's presence" mean exactly the same thing: the presence of his wife didn't prevent him from doing it. Spite by itself, on the other hand, means ill will or malice: "George kissed his secretary to spite his wife" means he did it to be mean to her.

And one that really bugs me: irregardless. No such word. The word is regardless.
 
Dexter Sinister
#63
Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

... I hate when people mix up "despite" and "in spite of". If you're doing something to spite someone, use the latter. If you're doing something irregardless of what someone said, then use the former.

Um... they're not mixing anything up. "In spite of" means without being prevented by, or nothwithstanding, which is exactly what "despite" means. Such as: "George kissed his secretary despite his wife's presence," and "George kissed his secretary in spite of his wife's presence" mean exactly the same thing: the presence of his wife didn't prevent him from doing it. Spite by itself, on the other hand, means ill will or malice: "George kissed his secretary to spite his wife" means he did it to be mean to her.

And one that really bugs me: irregardless. No such word. The word is regardless.
 
Vanni Fucci
#64
I had a boss that insisted that the phrase "in lieu of" meant "with regards to"...
 
Vanni Fucci
#65
I had a boss that insisted that the phrase "in lieu of" meant "with regards to"...
 
Vanni Fucci
#66
I had a boss that insisted that the phrase "in lieu of" meant "with regards to"...
 
Vanni Fucci
#67
...also I've found that managerial types have been using the phrase "going forward" in lieu of "from now on"...I don't know why, but it just irks me...
 
Vanni Fucci
#68
...also I've found that managerial types have been using the phrase "going forward" in lieu of "from now on"...I don't know why, but it just irks me...
 
Vanni Fucci
#69
...also I've found that managerial types have been using the phrase "going forward" in lieu of "from now on"...I don't know why, but it just irks me...
 
Gonzo
#70
No worries - People always say that now instead of your welcome.
 
Gonzo
#71
No worries - People always say that now instead of your welcome.
 
Gonzo
#72
No worries - People always say that now instead of your welcome.
 
Stretch
#73
Gonzo...."no worries, mate" is me favourite sayin"
 
Stretch
#74
Gonzo...."no worries, mate" is me favourite sayin"
 
Stretch
#75
Gonzo...."no worries, mate" is me favourite sayin"
 
Vanni Fucci
#76
Quote: Originally Posted by Gonzo

No worries - People always say that now instead of your welcome.

...and then there's "cheers"...hate that one too...
 
Vanni Fucci
#77
Quote: Originally Posted by Gonzo

No worries - People always say that now instead of your welcome.

...and then there's "cheers"...hate that one too...
 
Vanni Fucci
#78
Quote: Originally Posted by Gonzo

No worries - People always say that now instead of your welcome.

...and then there's "cheers"...hate that one too...
 
LadyC
#79
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter Sinister

Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

... I hate when people mix up "despite" and "in spite of". If you're doing something to spite someone, use the latter. If you're doing something irregardless of what someone said, then use the former.

Um... they're not mixing anything up. "In spite of" means without being prevented by, or nothwithstanding, which is exactly what "despite" means. Such as: "George kissed his secretary despite his wife's presence," and "George kissed his secretary in spite of his wife's presence" mean exactly the same thing: the presence of his wife didn't prevent him from doing it. Spite by itself, on the other hand, means ill will or malice: "George kissed his secretary to spite his wife" means he did it to be mean to her.

And one that really bugs me: irregardless. No such word. The word is regardless.

I was taught differently. You could be right, but it's still going to bug me.

I used irregardless on purpose - I was going to post it, but the Rev beat me to it.
(that's why I put it in italics.)
 
LadyC
#80
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter Sinister

Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

... I hate when people mix up "despite" and "in spite of". If you're doing something to spite someone, use the latter. If you're doing something irregardless of what someone said, then use the former.

Um... they're not mixing anything up. "In spite of" means without being prevented by, or nothwithstanding, which is exactly what "despite" means. Such as: "George kissed his secretary despite his wife's presence," and "George kissed his secretary in spite of his wife's presence" mean exactly the same thing: the presence of his wife didn't prevent him from doing it. Spite by itself, on the other hand, means ill will or malice: "George kissed his secretary to spite his wife" means he did it to be mean to her.

And one that really bugs me: irregardless. No such word. The word is regardless.

I was taught differently. You could be right, but it's still going to bug me.

I used irregardless on purpose - I was going to post it, but the Rev beat me to it.
(that's why I put it in italics.)
 
LadyC
#81
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter Sinister

Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

... I hate when people mix up "despite" and "in spite of". If you're doing something to spite someone, use the latter. If you're doing something irregardless of what someone said, then use the former.

Um... they're not mixing anything up. "In spite of" means without being prevented by, or nothwithstanding, which is exactly what "despite" means. Such as: "George kissed his secretary despite his wife's presence," and "George kissed his secretary in spite of his wife's presence" mean exactly the same thing: the presence of his wife didn't prevent him from doing it. Spite by itself, on the other hand, means ill will or malice: "George kissed his secretary to spite his wife" means he did it to be mean to her.

And one that really bugs me: irregardless. No such word. The word is regardless.

I was taught differently. You could be right, but it's still going to bug me.

I used irregardless on purpose - I was going to post it, but the Rev beat me to it.
(that's why I put it in italics.)
 
Dexter Sinister
#82
Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

I used irregardless on purpose - I was going to post it, but the Rev beat me to it.
(that's why I put it in italics.)

I suspected as much, but it's not always easy to be sure without the nuances of body language and tone of voice. Gotta be so careful when all you have is the words and a few emoticons to convey your meaning.

As for the meanings of "despite" and "in spite of," I checked three dictionaries before posting my remarks about them, and they all agreed with me. I'm no language Nazi though, meanings evolve, words and idioms don't generally have fixed and immutably precise meanings, and dictionaries aren't always current on usage in the real world. Words and phrases mean whatever people agree they mean. Gay used to be more or less synonymous with happy, for instance, and that's a major shift of a word's meaning within my lifetime. Similarly, "hopefully" seems to have shifted from meaning "with hope" to "I/we hope."

I think real language is defined by how people speak it and understand it on the street, not by what some dictionary says. Dictionaries just freeze it at a particular moment. Maybe we're seeing another shift in meaning with despite and in spite of, so I can't say you were taught wrongly, you were just taught something different from what I was taught and from what my dictionaries say. But I'm probably older than you, frozen in a different moment...

Language is so fluid it's a wonder we can have meaningful exchanges at all sometimes.
 
Dexter Sinister
#83
Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

I used irregardless on purpose - I was going to post it, but the Rev beat me to it.
(that's why I put it in italics.)

I suspected as much, but it's not always easy to be sure without the nuances of body language and tone of voice. Gotta be so careful when all you have is the words and a few emoticons to convey your meaning.

As for the meanings of "despite" and "in spite of," I checked three dictionaries before posting my remarks about them, and they all agreed with me. I'm no language Nazi though, meanings evolve, words and idioms don't generally have fixed and immutably precise meanings, and dictionaries aren't always current on usage in the real world. Words and phrases mean whatever people agree they mean. Gay used to be more or less synonymous with happy, for instance, and that's a major shift of a word's meaning within my lifetime. Similarly, "hopefully" seems to have shifted from meaning "with hope" to "I/we hope."

I think real language is defined by how people speak it and understand it on the street, not by what some dictionary says. Dictionaries just freeze it at a particular moment. Maybe we're seeing another shift in meaning with despite and in spite of, so I can't say you were taught wrongly, you were just taught something different from what I was taught and from what my dictionaries say. But I'm probably older than you, frozen in a different moment...

Language is so fluid it's a wonder we can have meaningful exchanges at all sometimes.
 
Dexter Sinister
#84
Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

I used irregardless on purpose - I was going to post it, but the Rev beat me to it.
(that's why I put it in italics.)

I suspected as much, but it's not always easy to be sure without the nuances of body language and tone of voice. Gotta be so careful when all you have is the words and a few emoticons to convey your meaning.

As for the meanings of "despite" and "in spite of," I checked three dictionaries before posting my remarks about them, and they all agreed with me. I'm no language Nazi though, meanings evolve, words and idioms don't generally have fixed and immutably precise meanings, and dictionaries aren't always current on usage in the real world. Words and phrases mean whatever people agree they mean. Gay used to be more or less synonymous with happy, for instance, and that's a major shift of a word's meaning within my lifetime. Similarly, "hopefully" seems to have shifted from meaning "with hope" to "I/we hope."

I think real language is defined by how people speak it and understand it on the street, not by what some dictionary says. Dictionaries just freeze it at a particular moment. Maybe we're seeing another shift in meaning with despite and in spite of, so I can't say you were taught wrongly, you were just taught something different from what I was taught and from what my dictionaries say. But I'm probably older than you, frozen in a different moment...

Language is so fluid it's a wonder we can have meaningful exchanges at all sometimes.
 
LadyC
#85
If you remember a time when gay was synonymous with happy, then you're probably older than I am.... but not by much. (41 next month - shop early buy lots)

I agree with you 100% on the rest... that's what I love most about language. Reminds me of the story of the prof who went on at length about double negatives, and how they could technically be seen as a positive. He then said that there was no case of a double positive meaning a negative, whereupon a student in the back said, "Yeah, yeah."
 
LadyC
#86
If you remember a time when gay was synonymous with happy, then you're probably older than I am.... but not by much. (41 next month - shop early buy lots)

I agree with you 100% on the rest... that's what I love most about language. Reminds me of the story of the prof who went on at length about double negatives, and how they could technically be seen as a positive. He then said that there was no case of a double positive meaning a negative, whereupon a student in the back said, "Yeah, yeah."
 
LadyC
#87
If you remember a time when gay was synonymous with happy, then you're probably older than I am.... but not by much. (41 next month - shop early buy lots)

I agree with you 100% on the rest... that's what I love most about language. Reminds me of the story of the prof who went on at length about double negatives, and how they could technically be seen as a positive. He then said that there was no case of a double positive meaning a negative, whereupon a student in the back said, "Yeah, yeah."
 
Ten Packs
#88
Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

This one is petty, but I hate when people mix up "despite" and "in spite of". If you're doing something to spite someone, use the latter. If you're doing something irregardless of what someone said, then use the former.


Actually, another one that bugs my is "irregardless" - There is no such word; it's "regardless".


 
Ten Packs
#89
Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

This one is petty, but I hate when people mix up "despite" and "in spite of". If you're doing something to spite someone, use the latter. If you're doing something irregardless of what someone said, then use the former.


Actually, another one that bugs my is "irregardless" - There is no such word; it's "regardless".


 
Ten Packs
#90
Quote: Originally Posted by LadyC

This one is petty, but I hate when people mix up "despite" and "in spite of". If you're doing something to spite someone, use the latter. If you're doing something irregardless of what someone said, then use the former.


Actually, another one that bugs my is "irregardless" - There is no such word; it's "regardless".


 

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