Smoking

peapod
#31
Gon zo you can smoke in a provincial building here if you are a judge. And taxpayers will pay for the fancy duct work to get rid of the smoke
 
peapod
#32
Gon zo you can smoke in a provincial building here if you are a judge. And taxpayers will pay for the fancy duct work to get rid of the smoke
 
peapod
#33
Gon zo you can smoke in a provincial building here if you are a judge. And taxpayers will pay for the fancy duct work to get rid of the smoke
 
Matty
#34
I just dont get it ..why sell cigarettes and make it legal to smoke, if your just going to make it illegal to smoke..well, anywhere. Oh, wait I know: taxes!
 
Matty
#35
I just dont get it ..why sell cigarettes and make it legal to smoke, if your just going to make it illegal to smoke..well, anywhere. Oh, wait I know: taxes!
 
Matty
#36
I just dont get it ..why sell cigarettes and make it legal to smoke, if your just going to make it illegal to smoke..well, anywhere. Oh, wait I know: taxes!
 
peapod
#37
I can see why its banned in public places, it stinks!!!!!!!!!! and some people seem to have the smell coming through all their pores, combined with a night of drinking....well its not pleasant being in a lineup with someone like that. :P
 
peapod
#38
I can see why its banned in public places, it stinks!!!!!!!!!! and some people seem to have the smell coming through all their pores, combined with a night of drinking....well its not pleasant being in a lineup with someone like that. :P
 
peapod
#39
I can see why its banned in public places, it stinks!!!!!!!!!! and some people seem to have the smell coming through all their pores, combined with a night of drinking....well its not pleasant being in a lineup with someone like that. :P
 
Reverend Blair
#40
That's where that was...I remember that story.

I know when they first banned smoking in federal government buildings (back in the 1980's) they had to make an exception for board rooms in the Indian Affairs office here or the chiefs wouldn't attend meetings.

The DIA staff were ecstatic because it meant they could still smoke at work.

That lasted for almost two years.
 
Reverend Blair
#41
That's where that was...I remember that story.

I know when they first banned smoking in federal government buildings (back in the 1980's) they had to make an exception for board rooms in the Indian Affairs office here or the chiefs wouldn't attend meetings.

The DIA staff were ecstatic because it meant they could still smoke at work.

That lasted for almost two years.
 
Reverend Blair
#42
That's where that was...I remember that story.

I know when they first banned smoking in federal government buildings (back in the 1980's) they had to make an exception for board rooms in the Indian Affairs office here or the chiefs wouldn't attend meetings.

The DIA staff were ecstatic because it meant they could still smoke at work.

That lasted for almost two years.
 
peapod
#43
It was a judge here rev, she is a smoker and they installed some expensive system for her smoking in her chambers. Paid for by taxpayers. A farce really, she should have paid for it herself.
 
peapod
#44
It was a judge here rev, she is a smoker and they installed some expensive system for her smoking in her chambers. Paid for by taxpayers. A farce really, she should have paid for it herself.
 
peapod
#45
It was a judge here rev, she is a smoker and they installed some expensive system for her smoking in her chambers. Paid for by taxpayers. A farce really, she should have paid for it herself.
 
peapod
#46
Here is the story.


B.C. fuming over judge's smoking privileges

It's not uncommon to see a gaggle of smokers huddled outside an office building. But at the British Columbia Supreme Court, one senior employee is allowed to light up inside, thanks to renovations paid for using taxpayer dollars.

Madam Justice Mary Southin of the B.C. Court of Appeal received $19,000 of public money to pay for a ventilation system in her office, allowing her to smoke without leaving the building.

An anonymous complaint last fall prompted a Worker's Compensation Board investigation of the Supreme Court building's fourth floor. In one office, the WCB found two ashtrays and "detected a faint smell of tobacco smoke." Investigators concluded workers on the floor were being exposed to second hand smoke.

The complaint led to extensive renovations on Madam Justice Southin's office, including the addition exhaust fans, new wiring and a new window. The total tab, all of it passed along to taxpayers, was almost $19,000.

B.C. Attorney General Geoff Plant defended the costly renovations by saying they will keep Madam Justice Southin in place. Without them, he says, she might have resigned.

"We thought it would have been a loss to the public, possible additional years of her service and her tremendous expertise, but also a financial cost in terms of paying the pension she'd be entitled to if she stepped down now."

There was also the legal issue of whether Madam Justice Southin's offices were considered part of her workplace or were more of a post-work sanctuary.

While the ventilation system ensures clean air for Madam Justice Southin's colleagues, city councillor and anti-smoking activist Fred Bass isn't sure the renovations were the most democratic solution.

"I think people should be treated the same," said Bass. "In a democratic society hopefully people would be treated the same."

Smoking in the workplace is not permitted in Vancouver unless there is a separate smoking room with a ventilation system
 
peapod
#47
Here is the story.


B.C. fuming over judge's smoking privileges

It's not uncommon to see a gaggle of smokers huddled outside an office building. But at the British Columbia Supreme Court, one senior employee is allowed to light up inside, thanks to renovations paid for using taxpayer dollars.

Madam Justice Mary Southin of the B.C. Court of Appeal received $19,000 of public money to pay for a ventilation system in her office, allowing her to smoke without leaving the building.

An anonymous complaint last fall prompted a Worker's Compensation Board investigation of the Supreme Court building's fourth floor. In one office, the WCB found two ashtrays and "detected a faint smell of tobacco smoke." Investigators concluded workers on the floor were being exposed to second hand smoke.

The complaint led to extensive renovations on Madam Justice Southin's office, including the addition exhaust fans, new wiring and a new window. The total tab, all of it passed along to taxpayers, was almost $19,000.

B.C. Attorney General Geoff Plant defended the costly renovations by saying they will keep Madam Justice Southin in place. Without them, he says, she might have resigned.

"We thought it would have been a loss to the public, possible additional years of her service and her tremendous expertise, but also a financial cost in terms of paying the pension she'd be entitled to if she stepped down now."

There was also the legal issue of whether Madam Justice Southin's offices were considered part of her workplace or were more of a post-work sanctuary.

While the ventilation system ensures clean air for Madam Justice Southin's colleagues, city councillor and anti-smoking activist Fred Bass isn't sure the renovations were the most democratic solution.

"I think people should be treated the same," said Bass. "In a democratic society hopefully people would be treated the same."

Smoking in the workplace is not permitted in Vancouver unless there is a separate smoking room with a ventilation system
 
peapod
#48
Here is the story.


B.C. fuming over judge's smoking privileges

It's not uncommon to see a gaggle of smokers huddled outside an office building. But at the British Columbia Supreme Court, one senior employee is allowed to light up inside, thanks to renovations paid for using taxpayer dollars.

Madam Justice Mary Southin of the B.C. Court of Appeal received $19,000 of public money to pay for a ventilation system in her office, allowing her to smoke without leaving the building.

An anonymous complaint last fall prompted a Worker's Compensation Board investigation of the Supreme Court building's fourth floor. In one office, the WCB found two ashtrays and "detected a faint smell of tobacco smoke." Investigators concluded workers on the floor were being exposed to second hand smoke.

The complaint led to extensive renovations on Madam Justice Southin's office, including the addition exhaust fans, new wiring and a new window. The total tab, all of it passed along to taxpayers, was almost $19,000.

B.C. Attorney General Geoff Plant defended the costly renovations by saying they will keep Madam Justice Southin in place. Without them, he says, she might have resigned.

"We thought it would have been a loss to the public, possible additional years of her service and her tremendous expertise, but also a financial cost in terms of paying the pension she'd be entitled to if she stepped down now."

There was also the legal issue of whether Madam Justice Southin's offices were considered part of her workplace or were more of a post-work sanctuary.

While the ventilation system ensures clean air for Madam Justice Southin's colleagues, city councillor and anti-smoking activist Fred Bass isn't sure the renovations were the most democratic solution.

"I think people should be treated the same," said Bass. "In a democratic society hopefully people would be treated the same."

Smoking in the workplace is not permitted in Vancouver unless there is a separate smoking room with a ventilation system
 
Paranoid Dot Calm
#49
I'm a smoker.

I remember going to the movies when I was a kid about 10 or 11, and how great it felt to buy candy cigarettes or black licorice pipes and pretend to smoke them while watching the movie.

I remember being 13 years old and in a reform school and where we were given one cigarette a day and 2 on Sunday's and holy days. When losing your smoking privileges was the biggest concern we had as "prisoners". Everyone had a butt-can fashioned from old cough drop containers and we took great pride when finding a cigarette butt with lipstick on the filter from the vistors area of the reform school.
Farmers from around the Hawksbury area (Ottawa) used to come to the school and grab a bunch of boys to help harvest their crops of potatoes or hay. They used to pay us 10 cigarettes for a 12 hour day. We kids just lined up and begged to go with the farmer.

I smoke and would agree that anyone who smokes is suicidal.

Calm
 
Paranoid Dot Calm
#50
I'm a smoker.

I remember going to the movies when I was a kid about 10 or 11, and how great it felt to buy candy cigarettes or black licorice pipes and pretend to smoke them while watching the movie.

I remember being 13 years old and in a reform school and where we were given one cigarette a day and 2 on Sunday's and holy days. When losing your smoking privileges was the biggest concern we had as "prisoners". Everyone had a butt-can fashioned from old cough drop containers and we took great pride when finding a cigarette butt with lipstick on the filter from the vistors area of the reform school.
Farmers from around the Hawksbury area (Ottawa) used to come to the school and grab a bunch of boys to help harvest their crops of potatoes or hay. They used to pay us 10 cigarettes for a 12 hour day. We kids just lined up and begged to go with the farmer.

I smoke and would agree that anyone who smokes is suicidal.

Calm
 
Paranoid Dot Calm
#51
I'm a smoker.

I remember going to the movies when I was a kid about 10 or 11, and how great it felt to buy candy cigarettes or black licorice pipes and pretend to smoke them while watching the movie.

I remember being 13 years old and in a reform school and where we were given one cigarette a day and 2 on Sunday's and holy days. When losing your smoking privileges was the biggest concern we had as "prisoners". Everyone had a butt-can fashioned from old cough drop containers and we took great pride when finding a cigarette butt with lipstick on the filter from the vistors area of the reform school.
Farmers from around the Hawksbury area (Ottawa) used to come to the school and grab a bunch of boys to help harvest their crops of potatoes or hay. They used to pay us 10 cigarettes for a 12 hour day. We kids just lined up and begged to go with the farmer.

I smoke and would agree that anyone who smokes is suicidal.

Calm
 

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