identity crisis


silvia
#1
hey
i live near barcelona, spain and im doing a project about canada, about its identity crisis and i would appreciate if people would give me their opinion =) thaaanks
Sílvia
 
Numure
#2
First off, tu es vraiment jolie ma chère

Now that I cleared that, Canadians do have an identity crisis... I for one, don't. I'm not Canadian, I'm Québécois. French speaking, not religious, open minded on certain issues, I enjoy discovering new thing, I love musique and dancing, I enjoy the arts (all forms)... That is for me, many of my friends are somewhat similar..

As for the Canadians, many (westerners mostly) consider themselves more American then anything.
 
TenPenny
#3
I think that you will find that Canadians are different in different regions.

Most obviously, Quebec considers itself a nation unto itself; you can debate the definition of "nation", however, it goes without saying that Quebec is "distinct" (to use a loaded word) from the rest of the country, in that not only the language, but the culture, the system of laws, everything is quite different.

The "west", generally meaning Alberta/Saskatchewan/parts of Manitoba, are much more in line with American thinking, values, culture. It is much more of an "every man for himself" sort of place.

BC is really like California. Just plain different.

Ontario is often criticised for the culture that believes it is the center of the universe, and in many ways, the rest of Canada resents the influence that Ontario has.

Atlantic Canada is different, too. Generally speaking, the people of Atlantic Canada work hard, and don't mind helping out others when they need it, but don't want to be taken advantage of.

What sets Canada apart, for the most part, is a belief that we should all work together for the common good; not socialism, but an acceptance that, for example, basic healthcare should be available to all, and we are willing to pay for this to be available.

We also don't believe in interfering in other countries' affairs; although, if required, we are willing to do our part. We are willing to treat other countries with respect, and we aren't mortally afraid of communism, Islam, people with dark skin, etc etc.
 
Andem
#4
I don't really see myself as a Canadian as having an identity crisis. I usually think in a European mindset, and my whole culture and upbringing is a mix of German / English. Canada is a multicultural country, it really is. So there's people across the country that have their own identity. Canada is very much about individualism.
 
researchok
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Numure

First off, tu es vraiment jolie ma chère

Now that I cleared that, Canadians do have an identity crisis... I for one, don't. I'm not Canadian, I'm Québécois. French speaking, not religious, open minded on certain issues, I enjoy discovering new thing, I love musique and dancing, I enjoy the arts (all forms)... That is for me, many of my friends are somewhat similar..

As for the Canadians, many (westerners mostly) consider themselves more American then anything.

I'm glad you posted that, numure-- but it does beg a few questions.

I was born in Quebec, as were my parents and grandparents, je parle francais courramnet, and yet, I do consider myself Canadian as well as a Quebecois.

As part of the anglo minority in Quebec, does that by definition exclude me from being considered a 'Quebecois'? Is there really a distinction between the 'pur laine' variety and the non 'pur laine'?

I've been living in the US for a while now and I always identify myself as a Quebecois and Canadian. If and when I ever go back, I'd only consider Quebec-- for me, it's always been 'home'. Also, in your opinion, does being a Montrealais into the equation, given the current past and current unique Montreal politics?

I'm really curious as to your thoughts.

Thanks!

[/i]
 
Numure
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by researchok

I was born in Quebec, as were my parents and grandparents, je parle francais courramnet, and yet, I do consider myself Canadian as well as a Quebecois.

Well, that is your choice. Its a personnal choice for each, but I am talkling about the Québécois Nation, not the Canadian Nation. So saying you are both, is a contradiction.

Quote: Originally Posted by researchok

As part of the anglo minority in Quebec, does that by definition exclude me from being considered a 'Quebecois'? Is there really a distinction between the 'pur laine' variety and the non 'pur laine'?

Ahh, your an anglophone. Explains why you consider yourself Canadian... Well, at the moment, you arnt exactly a Québécois, or the pure definition of it. It currently applies to french speaking people, let it be whites/blacks/browns... Anyone who uses french threw out his day. To me, its the only way we can define ourselves, as French Canadian just doesnt fit. Its like if we are recent French Immigrants to Canada (I've gotten that response so often from outsiders), yet we have been here longer then the english. But in a québec libre, A Québécoise/Québécois applies to all that live here, not just the french speaking majority.

Quote: Originally Posted by researchok

I've been living in the US for a while now and I always identify myself as a Quebecois and Canadian. If and when I ever go back, I'd only consider Quebec-- for me, it's always been 'home'. Also, in your opinion, does being a Montrealais into the equation, given the current past and current unique Montreal politics?

Montreal isnt so unique, only by the fact that the majority of anglophones in Québec, live there. I also live in the montreal area, I don't consider myself a Montrealer though. As for you considering yourself a Québécois first, Cool I certainly dont disagree.

Quote: Originally Posted by researchok

I'm really curious as to your thoughts.

Thanks!

Well, my thoughts are above, you shouold read other topics threw out the Politics forum. I'm sure you will find things of intrest on this topic.
 
researchok
#7
Plus ca change, plus ca reste la meme!

I remember this same conversation with a relative of mine...francophone...Je rire maintenant-- he was a hard core PQ back then-- now, CONSERVATIVE!

By the way, I do disagree with you on Montreal-- it is by FAR the best city to live in Canada-- even with the snow and cold(I'm spoiled now-- NC is has GREAT weather)!

At any rate, I'll always be a quebecois in my view-- wouldn't have it any other way-- and they same goes for the quebecois down here (surprisingly, there are quite a number) as well, Anglo AND Francophone!
 
Numure
#8
I agree, Montreal is the best City to live in, compared to the rest of Canada. Its so diverse. But I personnaly, prefer Quebec City.
 
LuShes
#9
Well I will speak from the west here then

Now I have never been to eastern Canada, give me time I will get over there *nudges Andem*

British Columbia is a beautiful province. Mountains and forests, and all the moose and bears you can throw a rock at. Politicans from here, can go fall off a cliff for all I care. If I hear another thing about a bingo scandal I will scream, lol.

Our identity is everyone elses. We are just a big heinz 57. A little bit everything. A fruit salad! lol. It's good and bad. You can look at the japenese or egyptians, and you can think right off the bat, what there history and culture is. And then its strange to sit here in Canada, and think of our history and culture...and we don't reallt have one as defined as anyone else.

But hey we are all good people
 
peapod
#10
I agree with you lushes on the beautiful BC, we are so lucky to live in such a beautiful place. Although I think if you did your family history which I assure you will become a total and complete addiction, you will find that we do indeed have rich history. It certainly opened my eyes. The thing about genealogy is the history of the country just falls into your lap, and its not the history I was taught in school. I also think Canada is so large and vast that most of us never see the entire country. How many countries are out there that the vast majority of its population never sees it.

That is what I miss about Peter Gzowski, he had a way of connecting us all. Because of him I made it my mission to see the great white north...
 
Darkgrammer
#11
Ya its a mixture of French and English. Its crazy how some towns only have French others only English, Seperating Canada in 2. like an inside civil war.
 
Numure
#12
Its more like, Québec only has french. New-Brunswick is bilingual... and the Rest of Canada is english. :P
 
snooker
#13
Silvia Hi ... Either way you look at it Canada is one of the safest country to live whether you are in the west or east or even where i am in Ontario ... I would have to agree with what TenPenny had to say ... But Silvia the best way to find out for yourself is come and visit , i'm sure you will enjoy yourself no matter which place you happen to visit .... One thing about Canada you are more then welcome ...
 

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