Tattoos!!!

Cosmo
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by Paranoid Dot Calm

I think tatoos are a scar .... and folks line up to get a scar!
No difference between having a scar or a tatoo. Both are rather permanent.

I think it is sort of like body multilation.

Interesting Calm ... I do agree that it is a form of "body mutilation" but that is not necessarily negative in my view. I love body art. I think the degree of commitment required to get a tattoo says a lot about the individual. Many people I know have tiny, hidden tattoos -- which is totally cool -- but I find it most interesting when people get tattoos that cannot be covered.

I got my first tattoo at 15 years old (yup, way back in the 70s before it was "cool"). Out of neccesity it was a small one I could hide from my parents. It started an ongoing desire in me to continue adding tattoos to my skin as important markers in my life.

Tattoos are an ideal way to start conversations with total strangers and to be give the opportunity to get to know deep truths about people that it would otherwise take years to learn. I the reasons people get their tattoos most fascinating. It's rare that someone gets inked just for the hell of it. Tattoos are deeply meaningful expressions. If you are honestly interested, people will reveal their truths if you ask.

In more than 30 years, I have regretted only one of my tattoos ... a matching tattoo I got with someone that turned out to be a bit of a psycho. I plan to have it covered. The rest of them give me a great deal of enjoyment whenever I look at them. The reason I have yet to get any on my back is that I get my tattoos for MY benefit and can't see my back. They are totems, of a sort ... spiritual markings that represent dreams, strengths, loves. It's like wearing a part of my psche on my outsides. It also provides me with the same kind of ritualistic reminder that Catholics find in their rosaries ... my tattoos remind me of my spiritual goals when I am feeling off centre.

I have tattoos on both arms, on my legs ... my tattoos couldn't be covered if I tried. It's been interesting in the work force, at times, but because I am completely unapologetic and entirely comfortable with my ink, even employers generally respond well. At least not a one has ever told me to cover them, even in office settings.

Actually, Calm, scarification is a very interesting form of body art. It's ancient tradition and can be quite beautiful. I love the pretty colours, tho, so haven't taken that route. I just stick with the tattoos and the piercings.

I think many people have a knee-jerk reaction to tattoos. Because they were once the dominion of the "bad" people, the bikers and druggies, etc., it's easy to dismiss tattoos without stopping to actually pay attention to their real meaning.

But that's just my opinion. Shell and I are working on a design as a symbol of our upcoming wedding and we're both quite excited. She's a "virgin" ... no tattoos. Yet.
 
Cosmo
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by Paranoid Dot Calm

I think tatoos are a scar .... and folks line up to get a scar!
No difference between having a scar or a tatoo. Both are rather permanent.

I think it is sort of like body multilation.

Interesting Calm ... I do agree that it is a form of "body mutilation" but that is not necessarily negative in my view. I love body art. I think the degree of commitment required to get a tattoo says a lot about the individual. Many people I know have tiny, hidden tattoos -- which is totally cool -- but I find it most interesting when people get tattoos that cannot be covered.

I got my first tattoo at 15 years old (yup, way back in the 70s before it was "cool"). Out of neccesity it was a small one I could hide from my parents. It started an ongoing desire in me to continue adding tattoos to my skin as important markers in my life.

Tattoos are an ideal way to start conversations with total strangers and to be give the opportunity to get to know deep truths about people that it would otherwise take years to learn. I the reasons people get their tattoos most fascinating. It's rare that someone gets inked just for the hell of it. Tattoos are deeply meaningful expressions. If you are honestly interested, people will reveal their truths if you ask.

In more than 30 years, I have regretted only one of my tattoos ... a matching tattoo I got with someone that turned out to be a bit of a psycho. I plan to have it covered. The rest of them give me a great deal of enjoyment whenever I look at them. The reason I have yet to get any on my back is that I get my tattoos for MY benefit and can't see my back. They are totems, of a sort ... spiritual markings that represent dreams, strengths, loves. It's like wearing a part of my psche on my outsides. It also provides me with the same kind of ritualistic reminder that Catholics find in their rosaries ... my tattoos remind me of my spiritual goals when I am feeling off centre.

I have tattoos on both arms, on my legs ... my tattoos couldn't be covered if I tried. It's been interesting in the work force, at times, but because I am completely unapologetic and entirely comfortable with my ink, even employers generally respond well. At least not a one has ever told me to cover them, even in office settings.

Actually, Calm, scarification is a very interesting form of body art. It's ancient tradition and can be quite beautiful. I love the pretty colours, tho, so haven't taken that route. I just stick with the tattoos and the piercings.

I think many people have a knee-jerk reaction to tattoos. Because they were once the dominion of the "bad" people, the bikers and druggies, etc., it's easy to dismiss tattoos without stopping to actually pay attention to their real meaning.

But that's just my opinion. Shell and I are working on a design as a symbol of our upcoming wedding and we're both quite excited. She's a "virgin" ... no tattoos. Yet.
 
Cosmo
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by Paranoid Dot Calm

I think tatoos are a scar .... and folks line up to get a scar!
No difference between having a scar or a tatoo. Both are rather permanent.

I think it is sort of like body multilation.

Interesting Calm ... I do agree that it is a form of "body mutilation" but that is not necessarily negative in my view. I love body art. I think the degree of commitment required to get a tattoo says a lot about the individual. Many people I know have tiny, hidden tattoos -- which is totally cool -- but I find it most interesting when people get tattoos that cannot be covered.

I got my first tattoo at 15 years old (yup, way back in the 70s before it was "cool"). Out of neccesity it was a small one I could hide from my parents. It started an ongoing desire in me to continue adding tattoos to my skin as important markers in my life.

Tattoos are an ideal way to start conversations with total strangers and to be give the opportunity to get to know deep truths about people that it would otherwise take years to learn. I the reasons people get their tattoos most fascinating. It's rare that someone gets inked just for the hell of it. Tattoos are deeply meaningful expressions. If you are honestly interested, people will reveal their truths if you ask.

In more than 30 years, I have regretted only one of my tattoos ... a matching tattoo I got with someone that turned out to be a bit of a psycho. I plan to have it covered. The rest of them give me a great deal of enjoyment whenever I look at them. The reason I have yet to get any on my back is that I get my tattoos for MY benefit and can't see my back. They are totems, of a sort ... spiritual markings that represent dreams, strengths, loves. It's like wearing a part of my psche on my outsides. It also provides me with the same kind of ritualistic reminder that Catholics find in their rosaries ... my tattoos remind me of my spiritual goals when I am feeling off centre.

I have tattoos on both arms, on my legs ... my tattoos couldn't be covered if I tried. It's been interesting in the work force, at times, but because I am completely unapologetic and entirely comfortable with my ink, even employers generally respond well. At least not a one has ever told me to cover them, even in office settings.

Actually, Calm, scarification is a very interesting form of body art. It's ancient tradition and can be quite beautiful. I love the pretty colours, tho, so haven't taken that route. I just stick with the tattoos and the piercings.

I think many people have a knee-jerk reaction to tattoos. Because they were once the dominion of the "bad" people, the bikers and druggies, etc., it's easy to dismiss tattoos without stopping to actually pay attention to their real meaning.

But that's just my opinion. Shell and I are working on a design as a symbol of our upcoming wedding and we're both quite excited. She's a "virgin" ... no tattoos. Yet.
 
Paranoid Dot Calm
#34
Hi! Cosmos

I never look at a tatoo as an expression of art.

I know alot of people with tatoos and from way-back in the 70's too.
And yes .... every person with tatoos always has at least one that they got bored with and need or plan to cover it up.
That is exactly what I meant by scar tissue.

I'm not into scar tissue because I was born with a scar. A hare-lip and cleft palate.

Calm
 
Paranoid Dot Calm
#35
Hi! Cosmos

I never look at a tatoo as an expression of art.

I know alot of people with tatoos and from way-back in the 70's too.
And yes .... every person with tatoos always has at least one that they got bored with and need or plan to cover it up.
That is exactly what I meant by scar tissue.

I'm not into scar tissue because I was born with a scar. A hare-lip and cleft palate.

Calm
 
Paranoid Dot Calm
#36
Hi! Cosmos

I never look at a tatoo as an expression of art.

I know alot of people with tatoos and from way-back in the 70's too.
And yes .... every person with tatoos always has at least one that they got bored with and need or plan to cover it up.
That is exactly what I meant by scar tissue.

I'm not into scar tissue because I was born with a scar. A hare-lip and cleft palate.

Calm
 
Cosmo
#37
Quote: Originally Posted by Paranoid Dot Calm

I'm not into scar tissue because I was born with a scar. A hare-lip and cleft palate.

Were you able to have them repaired when you were young? I had a friend with a cleft palate and because she was born in the 30s they weren't able to do a lot. Once I got used to the speach pattern, though, I never noticed it again.

I think there's a huge difference between voluntary tattoos, piercings and scarification and scars that we don't opt to have. The physical scars I carry that were not of my choosing (eg. from surgeries) are completely different psychologically than the body art I purposely apply to myself. It's apples and oranges, in my view.

So now that you have brought it up, how has your harelip/cleft palate affected your life? Growing up with any kind of impairment does shape us. Mine was not physical ... I grew up with poverty, alcoholism and abuse, but it still affected the course of my life. It is my belief that psychic scars affect us as profoundly as physical ones and no matter how many hours you log on the shrink's couch, the scars remain. Whether physical or psychological, some things are permanent. For me, it's all about how one deals with it.

Interesting topic, eh?
 
Cosmo
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by Paranoid Dot Calm

I'm not into scar tissue because I was born with a scar. A hare-lip and cleft palate.

Were you able to have them repaired when you were young? I had a friend with a cleft palate and because she was born in the 30s they weren't able to do a lot. Once I got used to the speach pattern, though, I never noticed it again.

I think there's a huge difference between voluntary tattoos, piercings and scarification and scars that we don't opt to have. The physical scars I carry that were not of my choosing (eg. from surgeries) are completely different psychologically than the body art I purposely apply to myself. It's apples and oranges, in my view.

So now that you have brought it up, how has your harelip/cleft palate affected your life? Growing up with any kind of impairment does shape us. Mine was not physical ... I grew up with poverty, alcoholism and abuse, but it still affected the course of my life. It is my belief that psychic scars affect us as profoundly as physical ones and no matter how many hours you log on the shrink's couch, the scars remain. Whether physical or psychological, some things are permanent. For me, it's all about how one deals with it.

Interesting topic, eh?
 
Cosmo
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by Paranoid Dot Calm

I'm not into scar tissue because I was born with a scar. A hare-lip and cleft palate.

Were you able to have them repaired when you were young? I had a friend with a cleft palate and because she was born in the 30s they weren't able to do a lot. Once I got used to the speach pattern, though, I never noticed it again.

I think there's a huge difference between voluntary tattoos, piercings and scarification and scars that we don't opt to have. The physical scars I carry that were not of my choosing (eg. from surgeries) are completely different psychologically than the body art I purposely apply to myself. It's apples and oranges, in my view.

So now that you have brought it up, how has your harelip/cleft palate affected your life? Growing up with any kind of impairment does shape us. Mine was not physical ... I grew up with poverty, alcoholism and abuse, but it still affected the course of my life. It is my belief that psychic scars affect us as profoundly as physical ones and no matter how many hours you log on the shrink's couch, the scars remain. Whether physical or psychological, some things are permanent. For me, it's all about how one deals with it.

Interesting topic, eh?
 
Paranoid Dot Calm
#40
Hey! Cosmos

I don't have any problem with my talking. I guess I can thank my Mom for that. Everytime I was "lazy" .... my Mom used to make me wear the dish cloth right across the face.

So, I learned. I have no impediment at all.

Most people who noticed my scar just asked if I got hit in the mouth with a hockey puck.

My identical twin was born the same way. His scar is much more noticeable than mine.
Also, his son was born with the deformity as well.
We were the only identical twins born in North America with a hare-lip and cleft palate and who survived. They fed us with an eye-dropper because we could not be breast fed.
A doctor came out of retirement to do the operation in 1949 at Toronto Sick Kids.
The Ontario government paid for the doctors.
The Shriner's Club paid for all the speech therapy and stuff.
I had free tickets to every Shriner Circus that came to town.
The Kinsmen Club paid for transportation from Sudbury to Toronto for years and years.

Calm
 
Paranoid Dot Calm
#41
Hey! Cosmos

I don't have any problem with my talking. I guess I can thank my Mom for that. Everytime I was "lazy" .... my Mom used to make me wear the dish cloth right across the face.

So, I learned. I have no impediment at all.

Most people who noticed my scar just asked if I got hit in the mouth with a hockey puck.

My identical twin was born the same way. His scar is much more noticeable than mine.
Also, his son was born with the deformity as well.
We were the only identical twins born in North America with a hare-lip and cleft palate and who survived. They fed us with an eye-dropper because we could not be breast fed.
A doctor came out of retirement to do the operation in 1949 at Toronto Sick Kids.
The Ontario government paid for the doctors.
The Shriner's Club paid for all the speech therapy and stuff.
I had free tickets to every Shriner Circus that came to town.
The Kinsmen Club paid for transportation from Sudbury to Toronto for years and years.

Calm
 
Paranoid Dot Calm
#42
Hey! Cosmos

I don't have any problem with my talking. I guess I can thank my Mom for that. Everytime I was "lazy" .... my Mom used to make me wear the dish cloth right across the face.

So, I learned. I have no impediment at all.

Most people who noticed my scar just asked if I got hit in the mouth with a hockey puck.

My identical twin was born the same way. His scar is much more noticeable than mine.
Also, his son was born with the deformity as well.
We were the only identical twins born in North America with a hare-lip and cleft palate and who survived. They fed us with an eye-dropper because we could not be breast fed.
A doctor came out of retirement to do the operation in 1949 at Toronto Sick Kids.
The Ontario government paid for the doctors.
The Shriner's Club paid for all the speech therapy and stuff.
I had free tickets to every Shriner Circus that came to town.
The Kinsmen Club paid for transportation from Sudbury to Toronto for years and years.

Calm
 
Cosmo
#43
Calm, how fortunate for you! Wow. Thanks for sharing that. I find peoples' life experiences endlessly fascinating. I guess that's partly why I love tattoos so much ... gives me an opening to ask questions that I would otherwise not be afforded.

One of the reasons I particularly love my labrys tattoo (a double headed axe the Amazons once carried) is that it is one of the few outward signs that I am a dyke. I wear makeup, nail polish, heels, fur ... I don't look "typical" and find the majority of people I meet assume I am straight. I got the tattoo because I loved it (it's on my left arm between shoulder/elbow) but it has provided a pleasant by-product for me. It's not so much about advertising my identity as letting people know who I am up front. I've discovered many people get all uncomfortable when they assume I am straight and I tell them different. If they know right off there is no surprises. I've seen people going over, in their minds, what they've said to me after they find out my orientation. It's a bit of a pain.

My labrys is my strength talisman. I guess I could just wear a necklace or something, but somehow putting it in ink under my skin makes it a part of me. It somehow internalizes the symbology. As does my other tattoo ... a blue heron on the opposite arm. That is my talisman of calm, quiet patience. Blue Herons can stand motionless for hours, patiently waiting for fish. They are also powerful, beautiful and ancient looking. I lack patience and find carrying the symbol of that quality helps me remember to work toward it with grace and strength.

Each of my tattoos has this kind of meaning for me. It's almost a religion, in a sense. People do look at tattoos as some kind of "bad kid" image but anyone who is serious about their tattoos can articulate a deep and meaningful reason for having them. There are the "posers" who just get one because it's the "thing to do", but the majority of people I know with tattoos do so from a far more significant motivation.

That's my 2 cents worth.
 
Cosmo
#44
Calm, how fortunate for you! Wow. Thanks for sharing that. I find peoples' life experiences endlessly fascinating. I guess that's partly why I love tattoos so much ... gives me an opening to ask questions that I would otherwise not be afforded.

One of the reasons I particularly love my labrys tattoo (a double headed axe the Amazons once carried) is that it is one of the few outward signs that I am a dyke. I wear makeup, nail polish, heels, fur ... I don't look "typical" and find the majority of people I meet assume I am straight. I got the tattoo because I loved it (it's on my left arm between shoulder/elbow) but it has provided a pleasant by-product for me. It's not so much about advertising my identity as letting people know who I am up front. I've discovered many people get all uncomfortable when they assume I am straight and I tell them different. If they know right off there is no surprises. I've seen people going over, in their minds, what they've said to me after they find out my orientation. It's a bit of a pain.

My labrys is my strength talisman. I guess I could just wear a necklace or something, but somehow putting it in ink under my skin makes it a part of me. It somehow internalizes the symbology. As does my other tattoo ... a blue heron on the opposite arm. That is my talisman of calm, quiet patience. Blue Herons can stand motionless for hours, patiently waiting for fish. They are also powerful, beautiful and ancient looking. I lack patience and find carrying the symbol of that quality helps me remember to work toward it with grace and strength.

Each of my tattoos has this kind of meaning for me. It's almost a religion, in a sense. People do look at tattoos as some kind of "bad kid" image but anyone who is serious about their tattoos can articulate a deep and meaningful reason for having them. There are the "posers" who just get one because it's the "thing to do", but the majority of people I know with tattoos do so from a far more significant motivation.

That's my 2 cents worth.
 
Cosmo
#45
Calm, how fortunate for you! Wow. Thanks for sharing that. I find peoples' life experiences endlessly fascinating. I guess that's partly why I love tattoos so much ... gives me an opening to ask questions that I would otherwise not be afforded.

One of the reasons I particularly love my labrys tattoo (a double headed axe the Amazons once carried) is that it is one of the few outward signs that I am a dyke. I wear makeup, nail polish, heels, fur ... I don't look "typical" and find the majority of people I meet assume I am straight. I got the tattoo because I loved it (it's on my left arm between shoulder/elbow) but it has provided a pleasant by-product for me. It's not so much about advertising my identity as letting people know who I am up front. I've discovered many people get all uncomfortable when they assume I am straight and I tell them different. If they know right off there is no surprises. I've seen people going over, in their minds, what they've said to me after they find out my orientation. It's a bit of a pain.

My labrys is my strength talisman. I guess I could just wear a necklace or something, but somehow putting it in ink under my skin makes it a part of me. It somehow internalizes the symbology. As does my other tattoo ... a blue heron on the opposite arm. That is my talisman of calm, quiet patience. Blue Herons can stand motionless for hours, patiently waiting for fish. They are also powerful, beautiful and ancient looking. I lack patience and find carrying the symbol of that quality helps me remember to work toward it with grace and strength.

Each of my tattoos has this kind of meaning for me. It's almost a religion, in a sense. People do look at tattoos as some kind of "bad kid" image but anyone who is serious about their tattoos can articulate a deep and meaningful reason for having them. There are the "posers" who just get one because it's the "thing to do", but the majority of people I know with tattoos do so from a far more significant motivation.

That's my 2 cents worth.
 
Twila
#46
With this talk of talismans, does anybody here have birthmarks?

I was born with a birthmark that is in the shape of a cats paw on my right arm. It is distinctly a paw print.
 
Twila
#47
With this talk of talismans, does anybody here have birthmarks?

I was born with a birthmark that is in the shape of a cats paw on my right arm. It is distinctly a paw print.
 
Twila
#48
With this talk of talismans, does anybody here have birthmarks?

I was born with a birthmark that is in the shape of a cats paw on my right arm. It is distinctly a paw print.
 
peapod
#49
I have one on my leg, in the same place as my mothers also a another trivia fact...my birthday is on the same day as my mothers
 
peapod
#50
I have one on my leg, in the same place as my mothers also a another trivia fact...my birthday is on the same day as my mothers
 
peapod
#51
I have one on my leg, in the same place as my mothers also a another trivia fact...my birthday is on the same day as my mothers
 
Twila
#52
So what your saying, Pea, is that you are a clone of your mother?
 
Twila
#53
So what your saying, Pea, is that you are a clone of your mother?
 
Twila
#54
So what your saying, Pea, is that you are a clone of your mother?
 
Cosmo
#55
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila

So what your saying, Pea, is that you are a clone of your mother?

LOL ... um, Twila ... Pea should appreciate that comment. Of course we all live in fear of becoming our mothers!
 
Cosmo
#56
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila

So what your saying, Pea, is that you are a clone of your mother?

LOL ... um, Twila ... Pea should appreciate that comment. Of course we all live in fear of becoming our mothers!
 
Cosmo
#57
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila

So what your saying, Pea, is that you are a clone of your mother?

LOL ... um, Twila ... Pea should appreciate that comment. Of course we all live in fear of becoming our mothers!
 

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