The New 'Smart Guns'


Colpy
#1
Smartguns, which just entered the market, are firearms equipped with small embedded computers that are supposed to enhance safety by preventing anyone other than authorized parties from firing the weapons, and, in some cases, by ensuring that the guns only fire when aimed at inanimate targets.
I do not doubt that supporters of smartgun technology wish to reduce gun accidents and violence. That’s a goal in which I firmly believe. But is smartgun technology really ready for prime time? Or do these guns introduce vulnerabilities that could create new, serious safety issues for gun owners and non-owners alike?
My discussion centers on the area in which I have expertise – the computer-related risks of the “smart technology” used in the weapons, and the human risks that they create; I will leave to others the seemingly never-ending debate over gun control laws.


Why You Should Be Concerned About The New 'Smart Guns' (Whether You Love Or Hate Guns) - Forbes
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#2
All computers can be hacked.

Also if I was a criminal, I would choose the readily available dumb guns on the current black market.

A smart gun may be useless for self defence.
 
BaalsTears
#3
To the extent smart guns are mandated it's likely that the value of non-smart guns will increase.
 
Colpy
+1
#4
Smart Gun Mandate Makes Gun Ownership Rich Man's Game
 
Tecumsehsbones
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

Smartguns, which just entered the market, are firearms equipped with small embedded computers that are supposed to enhance safety by preventing anyone other than authorized parties from firing the weapons, and, in some cases, by ensuring that the guns only fire when aimed at inanimate targets.
I do not doubt that supporters of smartgun technology wish to reduce gun accidents and violence. That’s a goal in which I firmly believe. But is smartgun technology really ready for prime time? Or do these guns introduce vulnerabilities that could create new, serious safety issues for gun owners and non-owners alike?
My discussion centers on the area in which I have expertise – the computer-related risks of the “smart technology” used in the weapons, and the human risks that they create; I will leave to others the seemingly never-ending debate over gun control laws.


Why You Should Be Concerned About The New 'Smart Guns' (Whether You Love Or Hate Guns) - Forbes

Funny. The same people who equate banning cheap-a*s Saturday night specials with tyranny are now concerned about gun safety?
 
taxslave
#6
Nothing like technology to make your life more complicated.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Nothing like technology to make your life more complicated.

And longer.
 
taxslave
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

And longer.

That in itself tends to create unforseen concequences.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

That in itself tends to create unforseen concequences.

Yeah, the best thing about dying is that it has no unforseen consequences.

None you care about anyhow.
 
#juan
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Yeah, the best thing about dying is that it has no unforseen consequences.

None you care about anyhow.

Depends on who is doing the dying.......No?
 
DaSleeper
+2
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

All computers can be hacked.

Also if I was a criminal, I would choose the readily available dumb guns on the current black market.

A smart gun may be useless for self defence.

I wonder if the Police would accept being equipped with that type of firearm.....at least they wouldn't have to worry about some low life snagging their gun and shooting them with it.........
Betcha they don't go for it.....
 
petros
#12
I bet you are right.
 
Tonington
#14
Smartguns are supposed to make everyone safer. Technological shortcomings in the current first generation of products, however, make the story more complex. While not all of the issues below necessarily apply to every smartgun model, together they form reason for concern:

1. Electronic devices require a power source, and smart guns are no exception. Without electricity they cannot be fired. Someone intent on using a firearm for home defense could find herself in serious danger if she drew a weapon on an armed intruder only to find that its batteries are drained. In general, it is not ideal to add a requirement for power to devices utilized in cases of emergency that did not need electricity previously. How many fire codes allow fire extinguishers that require a battery to operate? Before smartguns can be deemed reliable, therefore, they must incorporate countermeasures to address this issue. Simply warning users of low batteries may be insufficient, as many gun owners who do not carry their weapons with them keep their guns locked up, do not check them regularly, and might not see such warnings until it is too late.

Solution:

Wind up Guns - YouTube

 
MHz
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

Smartguns, which just entered the market, are firearms equipped with small embedded computers that are supposed to enhance safety by preventing anyone other than authorized parties from firing the weapons, and, in some cases, by ensuring that the guns only fire when aimed at inanimate targets.
I do not doubt that supporters of smartgun technology wish to reduce gun accidents and violence. That’s a goal in which I firmly believe. But is smartgun technology really ready for prime time? Or do these guns introduce vulnerabilities that could create new, serious safety issues for gun owners and non-owners alike?
My discussion centers on the area in which I have expertise – the computer-related risks of the “smart technology” used in the weapons, and the human risks that they create; I will leave to others the seemingly never-ending debate over gun control laws.


Why You Should Be Concerned About The New 'Smart Guns' (Whether You Love Or Hate Guns) - Forbes

I suspect this will not be a big selling point with the police and military when they are the ones that need it the most.
 
Jonny_C
#16
They should try one of these...
Attached Images
safe revolver.JPG (88.4 KB, 4 views)
 
Sal
#17
they will need to come up with a base where the gun is left charging at all times in storage lockup, along with changeable batteries
 
Colpy
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

they will need to come up with a base where the gun is left charging at all times in storage lockup, along with changeable batteries

The entire idea of "smart" guns is stupid. Firearms are such simple technology that one patented in 1905 remains the top-notch choice of elite anti-terror groups today. Dependability is the primary requirement for firearms, and these are extremely dependable, smart technology can only complicate things, and thus be counter-productive.

BTW, in my career as a professional gunslinger, I carried a quite adequate weapon....patented in 1899.

If it works, don't **** with it.

BTW, firearms are so simple that Australia is having a problem with home made machine guns!!

Home built M11 submachine guns seized in Australia - The Firearm Blog

So we wind up with $1800 .22 LR "smart" guns, while the crooks get cheap home made SMGs.

BRILLIANT!!

As well, the right to keep and bear arms in the USA is intended as a check on gov't power. If the gov't has the ability to "turn off" your firearms then the right is violated.
Last edited by Colpy; May 24th, 2014 at 12:58 PM..
 
Tecumsehsbones
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

The entire idea of "smart" guns is stupid. Firearms are such simple technology that one patented in 1905 remains the top-notch choice of elite anti-terror groups today. Dependability is the primary requirement for firearms, and these are extremely dependable, smart technology can only complicate things, and thus be counter-productive.

BTW, in my career as a professional gunslinger, I carried a quite adequate weapon....patented in 1899.

If it works, don't **** with it.

BTW, firearms are so simple that Australia is having a problem with home made machine guns!!

Home built M11 submachine guns seized in Australia - The Firearm Blog

So we wind up with $1800 .22 LR "smart" guns, while the crooks get cheap home made SMGs.

BRILLIANT!!

As well, the right to keep and bear arms in the USA is intended as a check on gov't power. If the gov't has the ability to "turn off" your firearms then the right is violated.

So, if I make the personal choice to buy a smart gun, you want to stop me from doing that.

OK, you're just a gun-banner. Not one whit different from all the other gun-banners. The central tenet of your belief is that your opinions should rule other people.
 
Colpy
+3
#20  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

So, if I make the personal choice to buy a smart gun, you want to stop me from doing that.

OK, you're just a gun-banner. Not one whit different from all the other gun-banners. The central tenet of your belief is that your opinions should rule other people.

Not at all. Buy anything you like.......even if the do not work. Not my business.

But I have a HUGE problem with the state deciding only smart guns can be sold. That IS my business.
 
PoliticalNick
#21
Definitely one of the dumbest ideas I ever heard. The only good use for this technology is to give it to the cops so they stop shooting everyone. As for us citizens, well why would we want guns that won't shoot at deer or elk or bears or home intruders? Why would I want to be forced into buying his & hers handguns when she can use mine when I'm away right now? Why would we want a govt or company that could shut down all weapons other than theirs when the citizens finally rebel against this 'big brother' society we are coming too? This would further the police state agenda by removing our ability to confront those who would control us and should be shut down as an idea before they start production.
 
Sal
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

The entire idea of "smart" guns is stupid. Firearms are such simple technology that one patented in 1905 remains the top-notch choice of elite anti-terror groups today. Dependability is the primary requirement for firearms, and these are extremely dependable, smart technology can only complicate things, and thus be counter-productive.

BTW, in my career as a professional gunslinger, I carried a quite adequate weapon....patented in 1899.

If it works, don't **** with it.

BTW, firearms are so simple that Australia is having a problem with home made machine guns!!

Home built M11 submachine guns seized in Australia - The Firearm Blog

So we wind up with $1800 .22 LR "smart" guns, while the crooks get cheap home made SMGs.

BRILLIANT!!

As well, the right to keep and bear arms in the USA is intended as a check on gov't power. If the gov't has the ability to "turn off" your firearms then the right is violated.

yes dependability...top requirement for sure

I do think it is a step which could lead to some interesting possibilities down the road. For instance weaponry that has capabilites other than just blowing the organs apart such as totally stunning or incapacitating someone without damage.

homemade machine guns, home made bombs, it is quite amazing to think about what your average person can now do with a little ingenuity
 
Colpy
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

yes dependability...top requirement for sure

I do think it is a step which could lead to some interesting possibilities down the road. For instance weaponry that has capabilites other than just blowing the organs apart such as totally stunning or incapacitating someone without damage.

homemade machine guns, home made bombs, it is quite amazing to think about what your average person can now do with a little ingenuity

Yeah....a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. I once knew a guy that had been an engineer in the CAF, an explosives and mine expert.........he left to work with the UN de-mining Afghanistan.

He once showed me his collection of anti-personel mines.........."without explosives" I asked hopefully.

Yeah, he said, but that would only require a short shopping trip and 20 minutes in the kitchen.

Boom.
 
Sal
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

Yeah....a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. I once knew a guy that had been an engineer in the CAF, an explosives and mine expert.........he left to work with the UN de-mining Afghanistan.

He once showed me his collection of anti-personel mines.........."without explosives" I asked hopefully.

Yeah, he said, but that would only require a short shopping trip and 20 minutes in the kitchen.

Boom.

20 minutes and a few chemical purchases...wow, it is extraordinary the amount of knowledge we have access to
 
PoliticalNick
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

20 minutes and a few chemical purchases...wow, it is extraordinary the amount of knowledge we have access to

You too can have the knowledge with just a few minutes and a google search.
 
Sal
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNickView Post

You too can have the knowledge with just a few minutes and a google search.

exactly...luckily it can be traced afterwards
 

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