Ohio finds link between fracking and sudden burst of earthquakes


B00Mer
#1
Ohio finds link between fracking and sudden burst of earthquakes

Light Your Water On Fire from Gas Drilling Fracking - YouTube



Ohio geologists have found a probable connection between fracking and a sudden burst of mild earthquakes last month in a region that had never experienced a temblor until recently, according to a state report.

The quake report, which coincided with the state’s announcement of some of the nation’s strictest limits on fracking near faults, marked the strongest link to date between nerve-rattling shakes and hydraulic fracturing -- the process of firing water, sand and chemicals deep into the earth to eject oil and natural gas out of ancient rock.

Last month, Ohio indefinitely shut down Hilcorp Energy’s fracking operation near the Pennsylvania border after five earthquakes, including one magnitude-3 temblor that awoke many Ohioans from their sleep.


Federal scientists have previously linked earthquakes in part to the use of injection wells, where post-fracking waste water is forced back deep into the earth for storage. None of the seven wells near the Ohio temblors were used for waste disposal, leaving Ohio scientists to go a step further to find a significant relationship between the initial blast of fluid and the earthquakes shortly after.

They “believe the sand and water injected into the well during the hydraulic fracturing process may have increased pressure on an unknown microfault in the area,” the Ohio Department of Natural Resources said in a statement about the Poland, Ohio, operation.

The new rules require companies to install “sensitive seismic monitors” before beginning to drill sideways into underground rock “within 3 miles of a known fault or area of seismic activity greater than a 2.0 magnitude.” Humans can generally feel earthquakes in excess of magnitude 3.

Drilling would be suspended pending investigation whenever the monitors detect anything above magnitude 1.
“While we can never be 100% sure that drilling activities are connected to a seismic event, caution dictates that we take these new steps to protect human health, safety and the environment,” said department Director James Zehringer. Data gathered by the monitors would be used to improve fault maps, he said.

Hilcorp Energy said it was reviewing the new permitting rules and that it remained “fully committed to public safety and acting in a manner consistent with being a good corporate citizen.”

Officials from Ohio and several other states that have seen a dramatic rise in seismic activity met recently to discuss how to handle the ongoing expansion of fracking to new beds of rock, where faults might not be well mapped.

Gerry Baker, an official with the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, called Ohio’s new rules a “sensible response to a serious issue that regulators across the country are closely examining.” Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas and Kansas have been among those seeing the largest surges in seismic activity.

Critics of fracking have long warned of a suspected connection between earthquakes and the expanded drilling for oil and gas in shale deposits. They’ve also raised concerns about the chemicals used contaminating groundwater.

Ray Beiersdorfer, a Youngstown State University geology professor whose wife cofounded Frackfree America, said the new regulations mirror what he has been seeking. He’s now asked Ohio officials to make public the data they used to find the connection as well as set the new restrictions.

“The whole problem is no one knows about these faults until the earthquakes happen because the faults haven’t been researched,” he said.

The Environmental Defense Fund also lauded what they called Ohio’s “reasonable precautions.”
“Although there is much uncertainty regarding what causes earthquakes and how dangerous small and medium quakes may be — and therefore this is a policy that may well evolve in the future — the state's decisive action is based on the best information available,” the organization’s senior policy advisor, Scott Anderson, said in a statement.

Oil and gas companies have tended to stay away from the well-known fault lines in Ohio, according to the industry publication Natural Gas Intelligence. But industry leaders have maintained that there's scant evidence that fracking causes earthquakes, labeling the temblors isolated incidents.

At Hilcorp’s site directly above last month’s earthquakes, the state has banned further fracking but has allowed wells already fracked to resume operating.

“This is also expected to have the beneficial effect of reducing underground pressure and decreasing the likelihood of another seismic event,” the state said


Ohio finds link between fracking and sudden burst of earthquakes - latimes.com (external - login to view)

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Frack, the Fracking Frackers... they only give a **** about $$$$$ and could care less if they destroy the environment.. it's all about greed.
 
taxslave
+1
#2  Top Rated Post
And keeping your truck on the road. Not to mention providing many well paying jobs.

Of course forva fee you could get clean, ethical oil from Canada.
 
PoliticalNick
+1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

Frack, the Fracking Frackers... they only give a **** about $$$$$ and could care less if they destroy the environment.. it's all about greed.

What the frack would you know????

Here are a few real facts about fracks that the article and most people get wrong....

Fracking does NOT force gas or oil out of the ground. It is already under tremendous pressure and flows naturally if you give it a path. When the pressure drops they use pump-jacks to suck it out. That is one of these....


Fracking (Hydraulic fracturing) is a process of using liquids and pressure to enlarge cracks already present in the geological formations to allow for greater volume of flow of gas or oil at a faster rate. They don't make big holes in unstable ground, the holes are already there and the ground is quite stable around them.

Almost nobody uses chemicals in fracking anymore, especially here in Canada. Around here in Alberta & Saskatchewan it is all water or liquid propane mixed with sand. The water is drinkable before they pump it into the ground, it picks up minerals and petroleum products while down-hole and has to be disposed of in an environmentally friendly manner when flowed back to surface. In other words the pollution of groundwater that may happen has really already happened BEFORE the frack takes place.

Of course we could put an end to all fracking if everyone agrees to letting the economy tank on a global level that makes 2008 look like losing some pocket change in the couch and you are all ready to pay $7.50/L for gasoline, $12/L for diesel and about $400/month in natural gas just to run your hot water tank.
 
petros
+1
#4
Quote:

“While we can never be 100% sure that drilling activities are connected to a seismic event, caution dictates that we take these new steps to protect human health, safety and the environment,” said department Director James Zehringer

Earthquakes are rooted10X deeper than any frakked well. 1s and 2s are pops and fizzles that are as normal as rain. A delivery truck going past your home will shake it far beyond anything to do with resources extraction be it oil gas or mining.


Gullible shmucks.
 
B00Mer
+1
#5
Well the last 3 posters are the usual suspects... always agreeing with environmental derogation.
 
Cliffy
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

Well the last 3 posters are the usual suspects... always agreeing with environmental derogation.

Frackin' frackers. Frack 'em all.
 
Locutus
#7
 
Blackleaf
#8
Most anti-frackers know little about how fracking works.

Those scruffy, left-wing anti-frackers protesting against fracking in Sussex a few months ago were waving placards saying that fracking poisons drinking water and streams and rivers.

It's a load of tosh, of course, but it's a perfect example of the myths that anti-frackers believe in.

As for earthquakes: why was there never any problem with mining causing earthquakes?

These silly myths spouted by the anti-frackers were invented by the same people who invented the global warming myth.

Top 10 Myths and Facts about Shale Gas


www.nohotair.co.uk/index.php/issues-and-facts (external - login to view)
 
wulfie68
+1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNickView Post

Almost nobody uses chemicals in fracking anymore, especially here in Canada. Around here in Alberta & Saskatchewan it is all water or liquid propane mixed with sand.

No. They do use surfactants and de-emulsifiers, as well as other chemicals to make the mixture gel, as they pump it down hole, so it will carry farther into the formation.


Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNickView Post

The water is drinkable before they pump it into the ground, it picks up minerals and petroleum products while down-hole and has to be disposed of in an environmentally friendly manner when flowed back to surface. In other words the pollution of groundwater that may happen has really already happened BEFORE the frack takes place.

Again not quite accurate. Some formations can be fracced with fresh water, but some cannot be, so they will have to use hydrocarbons, nitrogen or formation water.

The thing most people fail to understand about fraccing is that its many orders of magnitude harder to create a new flow channel up through thousands of feet of rock than it is to expand cracks and channels in formations that are already porous and permeable enough to allow petrolem to flow through it into a well bore.

As an illustration, look at a brick wall. Your producing reservoir is one of the grout spaces near the bottom. How likely is it to form a crack all the way to the top? THAT is the situation with fraccing. As I tell people all the time the most likely source of groundwater contamination, isn;t the fraccing itself but a poor bond between the cement holding the well casing in place and the native earth.
 
B00Mer
#10

Lawrence Wilkerson - YouTube



Frackquake..

Seismologist Dr. Elizabeth Cochran discusses research showing that injection wells from fracking and gas and oil production likely causing an uptick in U.S. earthquakes..
 
Liberalman
#11
Just like a sink hole eventually the ground drops and in fracking the pressure drops and the earth falls
 
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