Bare-faced messiah: The book scientologists don't want you reading


Locutus
#1
The book Scientologists stopped from being published in America for 27-years: Banned biography of L. Ron Hubbard claims leader had bizarre sex-rituals, phony war record and used racist slurs

  • Bare-Faced Messiah was first published in 1986 but the Church of Scientology has successfully kept it off the shelves for 27-years
  • Written by British journalist Russell Miller about Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard
  • Alleges that Hubbard lied about his education and childhood in official Scientology biographies
  • Claims to refute Hubbard's assertion that he was one of the nation's first nuclear physicists and a doctor
  • During his research Miller found unpalatable opinions on Chinese people written by the teenage Hubbard
  • Alleges that Hubbard would observe and documents bizarre sex rituals with a prominent Caltech rocket scientist
  • Outlines how Hubbard realized branding Scientology as a religion would be better for business concerns




more


L. Ron Hubbard's biography, the book Scientologists kept you from reading | Mail Online
 
shadowshiv
+4
#2  Top Rated Post
If Scientologists had their way, they wouldn't want any non-members to read at all. They would rather you be an uninformed sheep that will join their cult (Scientology is NOT a religion no matter what they try and say) and give them all of your money.
 
tay
+1
#3
A British book the Church of Scientology managed to block in America is finally on sale in the US 27 years after it was published elsewhere in the world.


The book, Bare-Faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard, written by Russell Miller, a British journalist, and originally published in 1987, appeared in print and tablet editions in the US earlier this month.


The book exposes many of the boasts of Mr Hubbard, the late founder of Scientology, about his early life and achievements as outright lies.


It was heavily cited in a recent US best-seller Going Clear, by Lawrence Wright, and this latest publication adds to a series of attacks and high-profile member defections that have undermined the oddball religion followed by celebrities such as Tom Cruise, John Travolta and Elizabeth Moss of Mad Men fame.


Bare-Faced Messiah exposes Mr Hubbard's claims that he was one of America's earliest nuclear physicists and a medical doctor as untrue. He actually dropped out of George Washington University and never received a degree. It also debunks many claims Mr Hubbard made about a prosperous childhood spent breaking horses on a Montana ranch and travelling in Asia communing with holy men and mystics.

Mr Hubbard was a science fiction writer and developed a series of theories and philosophies into a religion in the 1950s based on spiritual rehabilitation and the notion of followers being immortal beings derived from extra-terrestrial forces. Mr Hubbard died in 1986.

Robert Miller has updated some of the introduction to his book but essentially it is the same material that was published the year after Mr Hubbard's death.

At the time the Church of Scientology sued to get it banned in the US via the courts. After two years of legal battles, Mr Miller's lawyers abandoned their side's efforts and the book was available everywhere except the US for the next two-plus decades.

Now the new, independent US publisher Silvertail Books is putting out Bare-Faced Messiah in America.

It's website describes the book as telling the story of "a penniless science fiction writer who...became a millionaire prophet and convinced his adoring followers that he alone could save the world".

The publisher also lists prominently a book investigating Scientology by another British journalist, John Sweeney, titled Church of Fear.

Scientology has increasingly come under fire in the last two to three years from previous long-term followers and staff members accusing it of pressuring followers for donations, cutting defectors off from their families and subjecting staff to overwork and humiliating forms of discipline.

The Church of Scientology strongly and consistently dismisses such criticisms as inaccurate gossip by a disaffected few.

Robert Miller's book acknowledges Mr Hubbard's charisma and "mad genius" but attempts to debunk many of his claims and core preachings.

Mr Miller told the New York Post: "It's always been an utter mystery to me that anybody could read Bare-Faced Messiah and then still take Scientology seriously. You know, to have a founder with a track record like his doesn't make any sense to me, but there it is."







more




Book critical of Scientology, banned from America for 27 years, now goes on sale in US - Telegraph (external - login to view)
 
Jonny_C
+3
#4
It never ceases to amaze me that someone so batsh*t crazy could have followers who believe.

I suspect that Hubbard started this as an elaborate joke that somehow caught on. To me it just shows that some people will believe anything.
 
lone wolf
+4
#5
The crazier the con artist, the more the want-to-be-led will follow
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

The crazier the con artist, the more the want-to-be-led will follow

On the upside, to the best of my knowledge Scientologists haven't started wars or tortured and murdered unbelievers.

Yet. Give 'em time.
 
lone wolf
#7
Neither have Jehova Witnesses. I don't buy Watch Towers either
 
Sal
+2
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

On the upside, to the best of my knowledge Scientologists haven't started wars or tortured and murdered unbelievers.

Yet. Give 'em time.

of course they do torture and murder their own if they can not break you to their will after you have rebelled...their level of intimidation knows no bounds
 
Tecumsehsbones
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

of course they do torture and murder their own if they can not break you to their will after you have rebelled...their level of intimidation knows no bounds

Shotgun'd take care of that quick-smart.
 
Sal
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Shotgun'd take care of that quick-smart.

nah, you don't got a gun buddy...you are taken (against your will and better judgement of course) to a gated sanctuary to "recover". Watched an interesting documentary on it by people who had escaped the life. One girl told her story of her rehabilitation. It began with rock therapy: she had to move rocks for the first week...one pile to another and when you finished, you started again...when you are so tired you don't know who you are any more, oh and they do feed and water you (sparingly) ...then they help you to remember who they want you to be.

Another part of her therapy was removing all garbage from a dumpster and then cleaning it with her toothbrush. When the job was done to their satisfaction, you place the garbage back into the dumpster.

It goes on until you are 'better' and ready to resume life again.

Her parents were frantically searching for her because she had fallen off the face of the earth.

Sounds like a fun religion.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

nah, you don't got a gun buddy...you are taken (against your will and better judgement of course) to a gated sanctuary to "recover". Watched an interesting documentary on it by people who had escaped the life. One girl told her story of her rehabilitation. It began with rock therapy: she had to move rocks for the first week...one pile to another and when you finished, you started again...when you are so tired you don't know who you are any more, oh and they do feed and water you (sparingly) ...then they help you to remember who they want you to be.

Another part of her therapy was removing all garbage from a dumpster and then cleaning it with her toothbrush. When the job was done to their satisfaction, you place the garbage back into the dumpster.

It goes on until you are 'better' and ready to resume life again.

Her parents were frantically searching for her because she had fallen off the face of the earth.

Sounds like a fun religion.

Sounds like Marine boot camp.
 
Sal
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Sounds like Marine boot camp.

no that would have been okay, this is more like a nightmare...the kind where no one would believe it because they wouldn't let her leave...others have said the same, there is no leaving...you have to escape...and they will come after you

Celebrities Who Used To Practice Scientology - Business Insider (external - login to view)

Paul Haggis


Getty Images / Michael Buckner

Film director and screenwriter, Paul Haggis ("Million Dollar Baby," "Crash") spoke out in the New Yorker about his decision to leave Scientology in 2009 saying it horrified him.
"I was in a cult for 34 years," said Haggis (external - login to view). "Everyone else could see it. I don't know why I couldn't."
After reading an article by the St. Petersburg Times reporting physical violence committed by church members, Haggis was extremely bothered.
"They were ten years old, twelve years old, ... scrubbing pots, manual labor—that so deeply touched me," Haggis told the New Yorker (external - login to view). "My God, it horrified me!"
Haggis ultimately left Scientology after the church refused to publicly denounce Proposition 8 (external - login to view)—the ballot that banned same-sex marriage in California. He claimed his youngest daughter, Katy, who is gay, lost a Scientologist friend after outing herself, not because of her sexuality, but, rather because she lied about her sexual preference.



Read more: Celebrities Who Used To Practice Scientology - Business Insider (external - login to view)

Michael Fairman


YouTube screenshot



"Young and the Restless" star Michael Fairman joined Scientology in 2003, acting as the face of the religion for a few years, but left after having misgivings with the group.
He told the Village Voice (external - login to view) he began doubting Scientology leader David Miscavige's pressure to make expensive purchases in 2009.
"It was a really hard sell, and it turned me and my wife off. I stopped going to events," he said (external - login to view). "Then, when Paul Haggis's letter came up in 2009 (external - login to view), that's when I really started to look at things. It brought me to Marty Rathbun's blog (external - login to view), quite fearfully, because Marty had been painted as the most evil of evil."
Last year, Fairman made his "Suppressive Person Declare," public, a document which tossed him out of the Church.



Read more: Celebrities Who Used To Practice Scientology - Business Insider (external - login to view)
 
Locutus
+1
#13
If there is anyone who hasn't read about hubbard and his lifestyle back in the day, I strongly recommend it.
 
bill barilko
#14
Scientologists are vermin.
 
damngrumpy
#15
Every time someone brings this kind of thing and says how wonderful it is I have
one answer Remember Jonestown He was another nutcase and now we have
a lot of them Mind you when Christ was on the go there was more than one
pretender to the throne as well.
Religion is about politics and business and anyone who denounces it or even asks
the wrong questions is denounced. If the tough questions were answered they
might even end us with a better image
 
The Old Medic
+1
#16
L. Ron Hubbard was a second tier Science Fiction Writer in the 1940's and early 1950's. While he enjoyed some success, he was nowhere near as popular as people like Azimov, Heinlein, Clark, etc. But, he knew all of the major writers of that era, and he hung around with them.

He made a bet with several of his colleagues (including Heinlein and Clark) that he could found a money making religion, and get it declared "Tax Free" by the Internal Revenue Service. Initially, this was simply a ploy, but as he discovered that there was a LOT of money to be made as the "Prophet" of this "religion". He soon stopped writing commercial fiction, and devoted himself full-time to his new "ministry".

He also stopped any interaction with other SiFi writers that had been long term friends. A number of them wondered if he was not coming to believe in his own made up religion.

He personally disposed of many, many millions of dollars in "Church" revenue. But, technically, he was paid a very modest salary, he owned no property, etc. His every expense (and he had some whopping expenses) was paid for by the church.

He is listed, not by name but by what he did, in Larry Niven's book, "Inferno" (a modern version of Dante's Inferno, and a VERY good read).

He was a perfect example of a person that came to believe their own lies.
 
Locutus
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by The Old MedicView Post

He made a bet with several of his colleagues (including Heinlein and Clark) that he could found a money making religion, and get it declared "Tax Free" by the Internal Revenue Service. Initially, this was simply a ploy, but as he discovered that there was a LOT of money to be made as the "Prophet" of this "religion". He soon stopped writing commercial fiction, and devoted himself full-time to his new "ministry".

Yeah, that pretty much sums-up this drugged-up benny hinnion and his minions.
 
Sal
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by LocutusView Post

Yeah, that pretty much sums-up this drugged-up benny hinnion and his minions.

BUT, it isn't quite that simple...and therein lays it's brilliance... there are grains of truth and wisdom sprinkled throughout
 
Goober
#19
Yep- And people laugh at my beliefs- Christ on a Cross.
L Ron was crazier that a shxthouse rat- mind you wealthy as hell from pillaging the believers.
 
gopher
+1
#20
Many years ago the Reader's Digest had a great expose' on Hubbard and his cult. The government tried its best to stop him. But sadly, the courts went easy on him and that is why he was able to screw up so many people's lives.
 
shadowshiv
+1
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

of course they do torture and murder their own if they can not break you to their will after you have rebelled...their level of intimidation knows no bounds

They also keep on foisting Tom Cruise upon us.

Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

no that would have been okay, this is more like a nightmare...the kind where no one would believe it because they wouldn't let her leave...others have said the same, there is no leaving...you have to escape...and they will come after you

Celebrities Who Used To Practice Scientology - Business Insider (external - login to view)

Paul Haggis


Getty Images / Michael Buckner

Film director and screenwriter, Paul Haggis ("Million Dollar Baby," "Crash") spoke out in the New Yorker about his decision to leave Scientology in 2009 saying it horrified him.
"I was in a cult for 34 years," said Haggis (external - login to view). "Everyone else could see it. I don't know why I couldn't."
After reading an article by the St. Petersburg Times reporting physical violence committed by church members, Haggis was extremely bothered.
"They were ten years old, twelve years old, ... scrubbing pots, manual labor—that so deeply touched me," Haggis told the New Yorker (external - login to view). "My God, it horrified me!"
Haggis ultimately left Scientology after the church refused to publicly denounce Proposition 8 (external - login to view)—the ballot that banned same-sex marriage in California. He claimed his youngest daughter, Katy, who is gay, lost a Scientologist friend after outing herself, not because of her sexuality, but, rather because she lied about her sexual preference.



Read more: Celebrities Who Used To Practice Scientology - Business Insider (external - login to view)


Michael Fairman


YouTube screenshot



"Young and the Restless" star Michael Fairman joined Scientology in 2003, acting as the face of the religion for a few years, but left after having misgivings with the group.
He told the Village Voice (external - login to view) he began doubting Scientology leader David Miscavige's pressure to make expensive purchases in 2009.
"It was a really hard sell, and it turned me and my wife off. I stopped going to events," he said (external - login to view). "Then, when Paul Haggis's letter came up in 2009 (external - login to view), that's when I really started to look at things. It brought me to Marty Rathbun's blog (external - login to view), quite fearfully, because Marty had been painted as the most evil of evil."
Last year, Fairman made his "Suppressive Person Declare," public, a document which tossed him out of the Church.



Read more: Celebrities Who Used To Practice Scientology - Business Insider (external - login to view)

Leah Remini is a celebrity who has also recently left Scientology.
 

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