14,000-year-old village unearthed on B.C. island by UVic student


Cliffy
+2
#1
An ancient village older than the pyramids has been unearthed by a University of Victoria student, and a B.C. First Nation says it backs up tribe stories passed down for generations.
Alicia Gauvreau, an anthropology PhD student at UVic, has been excavating a rocky spit on Triquet Island, some 500 kilometres northwest of Victoria.

Scientists say the artifacts exhumed on the remote island are painting a picture of how our civilization began.

“I remember when we get the dates back and we just kind of sat there going, holy moly, this is old,” said Gauvreau.“What this is doing is just changing our idea of the way in which North America was first peopled.”

What the team found is incredible: Tools for lighting fires, fish hooks and spears, all dating back 14,000 years. The discovery has led experts to believe a large human migration may have occurred on B.C.’s unfrozen coastline. What’s more remarkable, according to one B.C. First Nation, is that the scientific discovery appears to corroborate tribe legends.

“It’s very special to not only me, but our entire tribe,” said Heiltsuk Nation’s William Housty.

White Wolf : 14,000-year-old village unearthed on B.C. island by UVic student (external - login to view)
 
petros
+2
#2
Backs up Tribe stories eh?

Bullshit!
 
taxslave
+1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Backs up Tribe stories eh?

Bullshit!

True. Based on the way all Indian stories start. "Many many moons ago.......
 
Danbones
+2
#4
Yeah, till you get dateble evidence, and then like Custer's story, which turned out to be completely false, and the NJN one checks out according to the archaeologists, the indians' stories turn out correct.
Christians especially can't stand proof cause they don't have any of there own - they only have EMPTY ridicule.

Of course you could take the christian's historical "story" if you want a monster load of provable bullcrap

when was the sea spilt so people could walk the bottom of the sea where there is actually proof?
when there were two mile high ice caps and the natives could walk the bering land bridge to where the food grows on the water..

got any proof the Hebrews were in egypt and this same thing happened to them?
like the arc story they stole that happened well before them according to the stone tablets etc:
NO
 
Ludlow
#5
Lotta bogus horse shyt on the internet.
 
Danbones
#6
yeah I agree Ludlow and in some BOOKs too.

that's why I have proof for my stuff like the "working cross" which actually works.
I actually have one
and most can't handle it



here is the book that would get a person started if they had the courage to look
patents and all
The Celtic Cross, Crichton EM Miller (external - login to view)

I can do longitude too in a way even modern science can't, but the 5000 year old chinese could

you should see how with some simple linguistic and mathematical codes involving the number 666 it becomes the holy grail
but i have found its way over most people's heads

only one person on this forum so far has got the concept
and I'm tired of wasting time trying to share
 
Twila
+4
#7  Top Rated Post
Awesome story Cliffy!

I found an article that shares further information on this discovery:

The oral history of the Heiltsuk Nation, an Aboriginal group based on the Central Coast of British Columbia, tells of a coastal strip of land that did not freeze during the ice age, making it a place of refuge for early inhabitants of the territory. As Roshini Nair reports for the CBC, a recent archaeological discovery attests to an ancient human presence in the area associated with the tradition. While digging on British Columbia’s Triquet Island, archaeologists unearthed a settlement that dates to the period of the last ice age.

The archaeological team, supported by the Hakai Institute, sifted through meters of soil and peat before hitting upon the charred remains of an ancient hearth. Researchers painstakingly peeled away charcoal flakes, which were then carbon dated. In November, tests revealed that the hearth was some 14,000 years old, indicating that the area in which it was found is one of the oldest human settlements ever discovered in North America. Or as Randy Shore of the Vancouver Sun contextualizes, the village is “three times as old as the Great Pyramid at Giza.”

Alisha Gauvreau, a PhD student at the University of Victoria and a researcher with the Hakai Institute, presented the team’s findings at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archeology this week. She tells Shore that archaeologists also found a number of artifacts in the area: fish hooks, a hand drill for igniting fires, a wooden device for launching projectiles and a cache of stone tools near the hearth.

“It appears we had people sitting in one area making stone tools beside evidence of a fire pit,” Gauvreau says. “The material that we have recovered … has really helped us weave a narrative for the occupation of this site.”

These findings may have significant implications for our understanding of ancient human migration patterns. As Jason Daley reports for Smithsonian.com, the traditional story of human arrival to the Americas posits that some 13,000 years ago, stone-age people moved across a land bridge that connected modern-day Siberia to Alaska. But recent studies suggest that route did not contain enough resources for the earliest migrants to successfully make the crossing. Instead, some researchers say, humans entered North America along the coast.

In a radio interview with the CBC, Gauvreau says that the ancient settlement on Triquet Island “really adds additional evidence” to this theory. “[A]rchaeologists had long thought that … the coast would been completely uninhabitable and impassible when that is very clearly not the case,” she explains.

The discovery is also important to the Heiltsuk Nation, lending credence to oral traditions that place their ancestors in the region during the days of the ice age. "[I]t reaffirms a lot of the history that our people have been talking about for thousands of years," William Housty, a member of Heiltsuk Nation, tells Nair. He added that the validation by “Western science and archeology” can help the Heiltsuk people as they negotiate with the Canadian government over title rights to their traditional territory.


Found: One of the Oldest North American Settlements | Smart News | Smithsonian (external - login to view)

Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Backs up Tribe stories eh?

Bullshit!

you really hate anything to do with first nations don't you? You must be the biggest native hater to have ever lived...at least according to the SH!TE you post here.
 
Corduroy
#8
edit: the above post answered my question
 
bill barilko
#9
Considering the mean sea level was over 60 meters (that's 200 feet to you cro-magnons) lower in the past 10,000 years there's some debate about the true age of this village.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Past_sea_level (external - login to view)

Anyway it's all NBFD-older remains of paleolithic hunters have been found in present day Florida (external - login to view) so the people who lived on the BC coast at that time were relative newcomers.
 
taxslave
#10
There is also evidence that Brooks peninsula was also ice free. Certainly different than the rest of the island.
 
petros
+1
#11
Quote:

The oral history of the Heiltsuk Nation, an Aboriginal group based on the Central Coast of British Columbia, tells of a coastal strip of land that did not freeze during the ice age, making it a place of refuge for early inhabitants of the territory.

That's the bullshit clincher.
 
taxslave
#12
I've been out there. Nice area. Looks like South pacific. Really nice beaches. Kind of snotty in winter storms though.
 
petros
#13
The whole coast and Island were iced over. Where the f-ck did "refuge seekers" come from? The South?
 
taxslave
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

The whole coast and Island were iced over. Where the f-ck did "refuge seekers" come from? The South?

Trump's America?
 
bill barilko
+1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

I've been out there. Nice area. Looks like South pacific. Really nice beaches. Kind of snotty in winter storms though.

Hakai Beach I know it well.
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

The whole coast and Island were iced over. Where the f-ck did "refuge seekers" come from? The South?

The Queen Charlottes were never glaciated-of course you wouldn't know since you've never been there.
 
Mowich
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

An ancient village older than the pyramids has been unearthed by a University of Victoria student, and a B.C. First Nation says it backs up tribe stories passed down for generations.
Alicia Gauvreau, an anthropology PhD student at UVic, has been excavating a rocky spit on Triquet Island, some 500 kilometres northwest of Victoria.

Scientists say the artifacts exhumed on the remote island are painting a picture of how our civilization began.

“I remember when we get the dates back and we just kind of sat there going, holy moly, this is old,” said Gauvreau.“What this is doing is just changing our idea of the way in which North America was first peopled.”

What the team found is incredible: Tools for lighting fires, fish hooks and spears, all dating back 14,000 years. The discovery has led experts to believe a large human migration may have occurred on B.C.’s unfrozen coastline. What’s more remarkable, according to one B.C. First Nation, is that the scientific discovery appears to corroborate tribe legends.

“It’s very special to not only me, but our entire tribe,” said Heiltsuk Nation’s William Housty.

White Wolf : 14,000-year-old village unearthed on B.C. island by UVic student (external - login to view)

Good share, Cliffy. Thank you.
 
petros
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilkoView Post

Hakai Beach I know it well.

The Queen Charlottes were never glaciated-of course you wouldn't know since you've never been there.

Never? Says tradition?

Don't you mean the Haida Gwai Lo?
 
Danbones
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

The whole coast and Island were iced over. Where the f-ck did "refuge seekers" come from? The South?

that may even have been possible

there were 50,000 year old digs in mexico if one cuts threw the PC, and the whole Manitoulin Island crew and their boss were fired for saying that the copper digs were 100,000 years old.
 
petros
#19
Nooooo.

Glacial processes

The Earth has been subjected to many glacial (cold) and interglacial (warm) periods, throughout its history. These are governed largely by changes in the Earth’s orbit called Milankovich cycles, but also depend on other complex climate processes.

Between 15,000 and 29,000 years ago, the most recent glacial period or “ice age” developed; today it is referred to as the Fraser Glaciation. Ice accumulated on the mountain peaks of Vancouver Island and slowly grew into large glaciers. Eventually they joined with other glaciers and formed ice sheets that filled the major valleys. These ice sheets also joined others from the Coast Mountains and filled Georgia and Hecate Straits, and Queen Charlotte Sound.

https://www.crd.bc.ca/education/our-...cal-history-vi (external - login to view)

All the way down to Seattle... solid ice
 
taxslave
#20
What about offshore? Triquet Island is several miles offshore. Nothing between it and China.
 
petros
#21
Offshore too.
 
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