1,000-year-old wooden toy Viking boat is unearthed in Norway


Blackleaf
#1
Buried deep within a well in a small Norwegian farm, researchers have discovered a wooden toy Viking boat.

The toy dates back around 1,000 years, and was probably played with by a child on the farm.

The finding gives an insight into the lifestyle of medieval children, and suggests that they were allowed to play, as well as help their parents on the farm.

A glimpse into the life of Iron Age children: 1,000-year-old wooden toy Viking boat is unearthed in Norway


The carved toy was discovered at the bottom of a well on a farm in Norway

It was whittled in a style resembling Viking longboats, with an uplifted prow

Researchers also discovered pieces of leather shoes in the well

Together, the findings suggest that the farm was not wealthy, but that children living there lived a happy life

By Shivali Best For Mailonline
31 March 2017

Buried deep within a well in a small Norwegian farm, researchers have discovered a wooden toy Viking boat.

The toy dates back around 1,000 years, and was probably played with by a child on the farm.

The finding gives an insight into the lifestyle of medieval children, and suggests that they were allowed to play, as well as help their parents on the farm.


Buried deep within a well in a small Norwegian farm, researchers have discovered a wooden toy Viking boat. The toy dates back around 1,000 years, and was probably played with by a child on the farm

The wooden boat was found in the coastal town of Orland, Norway, by researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

It was whittled in a style resembling Viking longboats, with an uplifted prow, and a hole in the centre that probably held a mast for the sail.

Ulf Fransson, leader for the dig, said: 'This toy boat says something about the people who lived here.

'First of all, it is not so very common that you find something that probably had to do with a child.

'But it also shows that the children at this farm could play, that they had permission to do something other than work in the fields or help around the farm.'

Despite being 1,000 years old, the fragile toy boat was remarkably well-preserved, probably because of the high water table in the well where it was found.

In a drier location, it would probably have decomposed, the archaeologists said.

Alongside the toy boat, the archaeologists also found leather pieces that they believe piece together to form four shoes.

When the shoes were first discovered, the researchers thought they must be from more recent times than the Middle Ages.

But when the radiocarbon dating information came back, it was 'big news,' said Ingrid Ystgaard, project manager of the dig.

'We found shoes that are contemporaneous with Olav den Hellige,' who was king of Norway from 1015 to 1028.


Alongside the toy boat, the archaeologists also found leather pieces that they believe piece together to form four shoes

The farm in Orland is the seventh studied in the area by the researchers, who hope to piece together what these clustered homesteads might reveal about community life in the Middle Ages.

Ms Ystgaard said: 'This is one of the biggest questions we are studying. The development of farms in this area over a span of 1,500 years in the past. It is fantastic material.'

The Middle Age farm was far from big cities, and was not strategically placed for trade, which suggests that it was probably not the richest farm in the area.


One of the shoe pieces that was found was a heel piece from a large sole, with a hole worn through it. The researchers believe that the clean-cut front edge of the heel piece shows that the shoe was worn out and they did repair it


The farm in Orland is the seventh studied in the area by the researchers, who hope to piece together what these clustered homesteads might reveal about community life in the Middle Ages

Finding the shoes, which resemble moccasins, also indicates that the farm was not that wealthy.

Mr Fransson said: 'These were more of an ordinary shoe. Awork shoe that they wore every day.

'One of the shoe pieces that was found was a heel piece from a large sole, with a hole worn through it. The clean-cut front edge of the heel piece shows that the shoe was worn out and they did repair it.'

But because the researchers found much of a whole shoe, 'that tells me that they weren't that poor either, because they had the means to throw (a whole shoe) out,' Mr Fransson added.


The boat was whittled in a style resembling Viking longboats, with an uplifted prow, and a hole in the centre that probably held a mast for the sail


The wooden boat was found in the coastal town of Orland, Norway by researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Read more: 1,000-year-old toy Viking boat is discovered in Norway* | Daily Mail Online
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Last edited by Blackleaf; 3 weeks ago at 07:14 AM..
 
Ludlow
+1
#2  Top Rated Post
Looks like a piece of bark with a hole in it.
 
Curious Cdn
#3
Yup.

That family must have been damned poor.
 
Danbones
#4
But the vikings still went on better sailing vacations then you ever will

and
at least they had two good legs each
 
darkbeaver
#5
The boat is full size for the little people who's village was destroyed by the giants who left behind thier bloodied old boots. The age of the artifact is no older than the fifth century AD in my estimation.
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by DanbonesView Post

But the vikings still went on better sailing vacations then you ever will

and
at least they had two good legs each

I have been in many, many sailing vacations. I have been sailing since I was twelve. I sailed my first offshore race in the Gulf if St. Lawrence on a 24 ft. boat(cripes, that was way too small) I used to compete in an Olympic class (Flying Dutchman). I raced regularly on the Great Lakes for three decades and only just stopped because of a bad injury a couple of years back.

I used to race in the Lake Ontario Single Handed assoc. races and I have competed in several of the 300 mile Lake Ontario races (about a 420 mile length) double handed, all sails, in large boats. (Try flying a spinnaker on a 35 footer for four hours, while also steering , while you partner sleeps). We won one of the very earliest ones.

We used to cruise all over the Lake. I've sailed the edge of it all the way around three times. We had to stop all of that after 9/11. You can bet that the New York shore communities really miss to tourist money that we brought in.

Cruised in other places ... Nova Scotia on a 52 ft. Lunenberg built schooner was particularly memorable.
 
Mokkajava
#7
Waits for them to find the bones of a small child at the bottom of the well ��
 
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