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A rare volume of etchings of Queen Victoria's baby - drawn by the monarch herself - that caused a Royal scandal after they were leaked to a journalist have gone on display.

The drawings are on show at Harewood House, near Leeds in West Yorkshire, as part of an exhibition that also features costumes from the ITV blockbuster series 'Victoria', which used Harewood House as a shooting location.

The book of 74 personal etchings of the royal couple's children and pets, which also features drawings by Prince Albert, includes handwritten annotations by Queen Victoria.

Extremely rare etchings of Queen Victoria's baby daughter that caused a Royal scandal when they were leaked to a journalist go on show


The drawings are on show at Harewood House, near Leeds in West Yorkshire, as part of an exhibition

The book of 74 personal etchings of the royal couple's children and pets also feature handwritten annotations

The furious monarch Queen Victoria applied to the courts to stop publication of the drawings in 1844

By Harvey Day For Mailonline
26 March 2017

A rare volume of etchings of Queen Victoria's baby - drawn by the monarch herself - that caused a Royal scandal after they were leaked to a journalist have gone on display.

The drawings are on show at Harewood House, near Leeds in West Yorkshire, as part of an exhibition that also features costumes from the ITV blockbuster series 'Victoria', which used Harewood House as a shooting location.

The book of 74 personal etchings of the royal couple's children and pets, which also features drawings by Prince Albert, includes handwritten annotations by Queen Victoria.


A rare volume of etchings by Queen Victoria's have gone on display Queen Victoria's eldest daughter. Pictured, the monarch's daughter Princess Royal Victoria is seen as a baby crawling along with a ball of wool




The drawings are on show at Harewood House, near Leeds in West Yorkshire, as part of an exhibition. Pictured, Prince Albert (top) and Queen Victoria's dog Islay (bottom)

The book of 74 personal etchings of the royal couple's children and pets also feature handwritten annotations by Queen Victoria. Pictured, the monarch's daughter Princess Royal Victoria


The drawings are on show at Harewood House near Leeds, West Yorkshire


In one of the first cases of its kind, the furious monarch applied to the courts to stop publication of the drawings in 1844 after journalist Jasper Judge managed to acquire 60 unauthorised prints for £5 from an employee of a local printer.

The collection was gifted to Princess Mary, the daughter of King George V and wife to the 6th Earl of Harewood, on her wedding day from a descendant of Prince Albert's private secretary George Anson.

It has gone on display alongside beautiful objects owned by Queen Victoria including her pocket watch and writing set.

Victoria and Albert were taught to paint by prominent Victorian artists Sir Edwin Landseer and Sir George Hayter.

Professor Ann Sumner, Historic Collections Advisor at Harewood House, said: 'This volume is incredibly rare. It is a beautiful and personal collection of etchings by the royal couple known for their love of their children, who are so charmingly depicted here, along with their beloved pets.

'This story reflects their commitment to protecting their privacy.

'It illustrates a delightful insight not only into the private lives of Victoria and Albert and their family, but also demonstrates their genuine artistic talent and unique collaboration.'


One of the sketches shows three views of Victoria, the Princess Royal, at bath time. Her nickname, P ussy, is inscribed at the top


In this image, one of Queen Victoria's daughters dressed in an elaborate dress is pictured in a well-crafted sketch from 1893


A series of drawings make up the sixth sketch, which feature Victoria's daughter Alice petting a dog, as well as three of her children together in the top right


Professor Ann Sumner, Historic Collections Advisor at Harewood House said: 'This volume is incredibly rare.' Pictured, Prince Albert's beloved dog Eos


This sketch from February 1844 show three views of the Princess Royal in her finery including an elaborate dress and bonnet


Jasper Judge managed to acquire 60 unauthorised prints for £5 from an employee of a local printer. Pictured, elaborately dressed courtiers carrying swords in a heated argument


The collection was gifted to Princess Mary, the daughter of King George V and wife to the 6th Earl of Harewood on her wedding day. Pictured, a freestyle sketch of various faces




Pictured, highly-detailed sketches of three doves in a dovecote (top) and two eagle heads complete with feathers by Prince Albert (bottom)


Victoria and Albert were taught to paint by prominent Victorian artists Sir Edwin Landseer and Sir George Hayter. Pictured, an elderly woman surrounded by her children




The curator added: 'This story reflects their commitment to protecting their privacy.' Pictured, Henry VIII drawn by Albert (top) and another man (bottom)




The furious monarch applied to the courts to stop publication of the drawings in 1844. Pictured, a dramatic family struggle (top) and Queen Victoria's dog Islay (bottom)




The bound volume of sketches (pictured top) and a detailed fantasy drawing by Prince Albert (pictured bottom)




A tender maternal scene as a mother feeds her baby (pictured left) and tends to her other needs (pictured right)

Personal etchings Queen Victoria didn't want you to see



In 1844 Jasper Judge, a journalist, who got hold of copies of the etchings via a printmaker in Windsor, approached publisher William Strange to plan an exhibition of the etchings, as well as a catalogue.

Prince Albert and Queen Victoria immediately sought legal advice and launched lawsuits and injunctions attempting to ban the display and protect their family's privacy.

These actions led to the an injunction taking place; the Prince and Queen were successful and the exhibition never took place.

Seen as the first injunction of its kind to protect the privacy and image of a high profile person, the actions of Victoria and Albert are now familiar in today's celebrity world.

During the case, Barrister Sir J. Knight Bruce, noted that the printmaker's actions had been 'an intrusion not alone in breach of conventional rules, but offensive to that inbred sense of propriety natural to every man - if, intrusion indeed, fitly describes a sordid spying into the privacy of domestic life - into the home (a word hitherto scared among us)'.

The case remains a defining judgement in the development of the law of copyright.


Read more: Extremely rare etchings of Queen Victoria's baby daughter | Daily Mail Online
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