#1
A waistcoat worn by Captain Cook in the 18th century is expected to fetch almost 700,000 at auction.

The garment was used by the explorer in 1770, the year he sailed to Australia on his voyage of discovery.

The cream silk waistcoat is embroidered with flowers and is fastened with brown leather buttons.


A stitch in time: Historic waistcoat worn by Captain Cook as he explored Australia and embroidered with plants he discovered is expected to sell for 700,000

The garment was used by the explorer in 1770, when he travelled to Australia
It is embroidered with flowers that the group discovered on their exploration
In 1912, the waistcoat was altered so feminist pianist Ruby Rich could wear it


By Fionn Hargreaves for Mailonline
13 March 2017


Captain Cook's waistcoat is expected to sell for almost 700,000 at auction in Australia. The garment was worn by the explorer in 1770 when he journeyed to Oceania

A waistcoat worn by Captain Cook in the 18th century is expected to fetch almost 700,000 at auction.

The garment was used by the explorer in 1770, the year he sailed to Australia on his voyage of discovery.

The cream silk waistcoat is embroidered with flowers and is fastened with brown leather buttons.

The flowers stitched on the piece of clothing are believed to have been inspired by Cook's travels around the country.

Among the flowers depicted are exotic plants like the hibiscus, banksia seed, and boronia.

The hibiscus, the national flower of Malaysia, is native to countries in South East Asia and the Pacific Islands.

According to auctioneers Aalders, the colour of the waistcoat was also inspired by his Oceanic explorations.

James Cook landed in Australia with botanist Joseph Banks and artist Sydney Parkinson in May 1770.


The intricate waistcoat features exotic flowers Cook encountered on his voyages, including the hibiscus, banksia seed, and boronia. It is fastened by unusual brown leather buttons


Banskia seeds are thought to be named after botanist Joseph Banks, who travelled to Australia with Captain Cook. Experts say the colour of the waistcoat is inspired by Oceania


James Cook landed in Australia with botanist Joseph Banks (pictured left) in May 1770. They were sent to explore the unknown seas and took an interest in Australia's flora and fauna

They were sent to explore the unknown seas around Australia.

The group were especially interested in detailing the flora and fauna of the unknown island.

The banksia seed, identified on Cook's waistcoat, is said to be named after fellow explorer Joseph Banks.

Sydney Parkinson made detailed drawings and paintings of the exotic flowers they found there.

Their ship, HMS Endeavour, landed in Botany Bay, where they spent six days.

When Joseph Banks returned, he spoke so favourably about the area that the first colonists decided to make camp at Botany Bay.

They then sailed to Cape York, far north Queensland, where they stayed for eight weeks.


Their ship, HMS Endeavour, landed in Cape York, far North Queensland, where they stayed for eight weeks. Pictured, a painting of Captain Cook taking possession of New South Wales

But the first governor of Australia, Arthur Philip, found that it did not live up to Banks's description.

Captain Cook returned to Britain in 1771 and was hailed a hero, but the explorer was killed in Hawaii eight years later.

After his death, his family kept the waistcoat, which was then bought by antique dealers Helen and Isabel Woollan.

It was bought by Viscount Leverhulme, who presented the vest in London to Dr Ruby Rich of Sydney in 1912.


Captain Cook returned to Britain a hero and continued to explore the South Seas and Asia until his death in Hawaii in 1779. Pictured, ships the Resolution and the Adventure during Cook's second voyage, between 1772 and 1775

Dr Rich, a feminist and pianist, had darts stitched into the front of the waistcoat so she could wear it.

She gave it to her nephew Charles Rich Esq of Sydney, who put it up for sale in 1981.

Auctioneer Julian Aalders told the Daily Telegraph: 'We have had a lot of interest from both overseas and local collectors.

'We would like to see it bought by someone who is happy for it to be on loan to a museum.'

Read more: Captain Cook's waistcoat expected to sell for 700,000 | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
Last edited by Blackleaf; Mar 13th, 2017 at 11:27 AM..