The soldiers of Stonehenge


Blackleaf
+2
#1  Top Rated Post
Poignant footage of First World War soldiers will be projected on to Stonehenge as part of a new English Heritage exhibition telling the story of how one million men trained on Salisbury Plain during the conflict.

The footage of the soldiers marching is being beamed onto the ancient stones at night for a memorial service marking the opening of the Soldiers At Stonehenge project.

Although it is usually associated with more ancient history, Stonehenge stood at the centre of what was, between 1914 and 1918, the world's largest military training camp.

During the conflict, some 180,000 men were stationed there at any one time, coming from across the British Empire to prepare for battle.

The exhibition, which opens tomorrow at the Stonehenge Visitors Centre, aims to explore the untold story of Stonehenge, Salisbury Plain and those who trained for war around the iconic site.

The soldiers of Stonehenge: New exhibition that will tell story of how one million men trained on Salisbury Plain during First World War



Footage of soldiers marching being beamed onto the ancient stones during Soldiers At Stonehenge exhibition
During WW1, Salisbury Plain was world's largest military training camp, with 180,000 stationed there at any one time
Soldiers from across the British Empire would dig trenches to replicate those on the Western Front
Technology developed nearby led to developments in aviation, artillery and chemical warfare

Soldiers at Stonehenge | English Heritage (external - login to view)

By Lucy Crossley for MailOnline
4 November 2014
Daily Mail

Poignant footage of First World War soldiers will be projected on to Stonehenge as part of a new exhibition telling the story of how one million men trained on Salisbury Plain during the conflict.

The footage of the soldiers marching is being beamed onto the ancient stones at night for a memorial service marking the opening of the Soldiers At Stonehenge project.

Although it is usually associated with more ancient history, Stonehenge stood at the centre of what was, between 1914 and 1918, the world's largest military training camp.


Poignant: Footage of First World War soldiers will be projected on to Stonehenge as part of a new exhibition telling the story of how one million men trained on Salisbury Plain during the conflict


Troops: During the conflict, some 180,000 men were stationed on Salisbury Plain at any one time, coming from across the British Empire to prepare for battle

During the conflict, some 180,000 men were stationed there at any one time, coming from across the British Empire to prepare for battle.

The exhibition, which opens tomorrow at the Stonehenge Visitors Centre, aims to explore the untold story of Stonehenge, Salisbury Plain and those who trained for war around the iconic site.

Visitors to the centre will be able to learn what life was like for the men who trained on Salisbury Plain, though stories, photographs and historical artifacts.

The exhibition, which will run for six months, will also show how reminders of their presence can still be seen across the wider Stonehenge landscape, with Salisbury Plain still used by the military for training purposes today.

'Troops from across the British Empire travelled to the Salisbury Plains to prepare for war starting with Canadian soldiers in 1914, followed by men of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZACs) in 1916,' said Robert Campbell, Head of Interpretation at English Heritage.

'The task of the men training on Salisbury Plain was to overcome the horrific stalemate of trench warfare.

'To replicate conditions on the Western Front, soldiers dug intricate networks of trenches which were then pounded by shellfire. Innovative but deadly new technology pioneered in the training camps and secret establishments created in Wiltshire during 1914 - 1918 resulted in major developments in aviation, artillery and chemical warfare.'

Items on show include medals awarded to Lieutenant Edmund Antrobus, the heir to Stonehenge, who was killed in action, and original artwork of The Better 'Ole - one of the most famous war cartoons of all time which was developed by Bruce Bairnsfather on Salisbury Plain.


Soldiers: Drummer Jacob Bruce and Lance Corporal Owein O'Brien from the 1st Battalion Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, based at nearby Tidworth, practice the 'Last Post' as they prepare for a memorial service marking the opening of the exhibition tomorrow


History: Although it is usually associated with more ancient history, Stonehenge stood at the centre of what was, between 1914 and 1918, the world's largest military training camp

The humourist and cartoonist had been posted to the 34th Division headquarters on Salisbury Plain, after serving at the front and being hospitalised with shellshock following the Second Battle of Ypres.

It was while he was on Salisbury Plan that he developed his humorous series of cartoons about life in the trenches, with The Better 'Ole, depicting two soldiers in a muddy shell hole, one of the best remembered.

Bairnsfather went on to invent Old Bill, an old soldier with a trademark walrus moustache and balaclava. His cartoons achieved immense popularity because they expressed the views of the ordinary soldier in the trenches.

Lieutenant Antrobus, whose father Sir Edmund had also been a soldier, was killed in action just seventeen days after arriving at the front.

Sir Edmund, who served in the 1880s Sudan Campaign, inherited Stonehenge as part of the Amesbury Abbey estate in 1899. His son and heir landed in Belgium in 1914 and was killed in action at Ypres in October 1914. Sir Edmund died in February 1915, it was said, of a broken heart. After their deaths the grieving Lady Florence Antrobus placed the war medals of both her husband and son within an ornate cabinet along with a portrait of her son which she had painted herself.

The loss of both the owner and heir to Stonehenge lead in part to the monument being put up for sale at auction in 1915. Although there were calls for the Nation to purchase Stonehenge, it was Cecil Chubb, a locally born Barrister, who was the successful purchaser and it was he who was the last person to privately own Stonehenge.

Also on show are a number of archaeological finds including cap badges, rifle cartridges, aircraft parts and highly personal items such as a spoon and even part of a bottle of Australian hair tonic.

The special exhibition, Soldiers at Stonehenge - Salisbury Plain And The Journey To The First World War (external - login to view) opens on November 5 at the Stonehenge exhibition and visitor centre. Admission is included in the entry price for Stonehenge.


Read more: Soldiers At Stonehenge exhibition will tell story of men trained on Salisbury Plain | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter (external - login to view) | DailyMail on Facebook (external - login to view)
Last edited by Blackleaf; Nov 4th, 2014 at 08:37 AM..
 
DaSleeper
+1
#2
 
Sal
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

Poignant footage of First World War soldiers will be projected on to Stonehenge as part of a new English Heritage exhibition telling the story of how one million men trained on Salisbury Plain during the conflict.

The footage of the soldiers marching is being beamed onto the ancient stones at night for a memorial service marking the opening of the Soldiers At Stonehenge project.

Although it is usually associated with more ancient history, Stonehenge stood at the centre of what was, between 1914 and 1918, the world's largest military training camp.

During the conflict, some 180,000 men were stationed there at any one time, coming from across the British Empire to prepare for battle.

The exhibition, which opens tomorrow at the Stonehenge Visitors Centre, aims to explore the untold story of Stonehenge, Salisbury Plain and those who trained for war around the iconic site.

The soldiers of Stonehenge: New exhibition that will tell story of how one million men trained on Salisbury Plain during First World War



Footage of soldiers marching being beamed onto the ancient stones during Soldiers At Stonehenge exhibition
During WW1, Salisbury Plain was world's largest military training camp, with 180,000 stationed there at any one time
Soldiers from across the British Empire would dig trenches to replicate those on the Western Front
Technology developed nearby led to developments in aviation, artillery and chemical warfare

Soldiers at Stonehenge | English Heritage (external - login to view)

By Lucy Crossley for MailOnline
4 November 2014
Daily Mail

Poignant footage of First World War soldiers will be projected on to Stonehenge as part of a new exhibition telling the story of how one million men trained on Salisbury Plain during the conflict.

The footage of the soldiers marching is being beamed onto the ancient stones at night for a memorial service marking the opening of the Soldiers At Stonehenge project.

Although it is usually associated with more ancient history, Stonehenge stood at the centre of what was, between 1914 and 1918, the world's largest military training camp.


Poignant: Footage of First World War soldiers will be projected on to Stonehenge as part of a new exhibition telling the story of how one million men trained on Salisbury Plain during the conflict


Troops: During the conflict, some 180,000 men were stationed on Salisbury Plain at any one time, coming from across the British Empire to prepare for battle

During the conflict, some 180,000 men were stationed there at any one time, coming from across the British Empire to prepare for battle.

The exhibition, which opens tomorrow at the Stonehenge Visitors Centre, aims to explore the untold story of Stonehenge, Salisbury Plain and those who trained for war around the iconic site.

Visitors to the centre will be able to learn what life was like for the men who trained on Salisbury Plain, though stories, photographs and historical artifacts.

The exhibition, which will run for six months, will also show how reminders of their presence can still be seen across the wider Stonehenge landscape, with Salisbury Plain still used by the military for training purposes today.

'Troops from across the British Empire travelled to the Salisbury Plains to prepare for war starting with Canadian soldiers in 1914, followed by men of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZACs) in 1916,' said Robert Campbell, Head of Interpretation at English Heritage.

'The task of the men training on Salisbury Plain was to overcome the horrific stalemate of trench warfare.

'To replicate conditions on the Western Front, soldiers dug intricate networks of trenches which were then pounded by shellfire. Innovative but deadly new technology pioneered in the training camps and secret establishments created in Wiltshire during 1914 - 1918 resulted in major developments in aviation, artillery and chemical warfare.'

Items on show include medals awarded to Lieutenant Edmund Antrobus, the heir to Stonehenge, who was killed in action, and original artwork of The Better 'Ole - one of the most famous war cartoons of all time which was developed by Bruce Bairnsfather on Salisbury Plain.


Soldiers: Drummer Jacob Bruce and Lance Corporal Owein O'Brien from the 1st Battalion Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, based at nearby Tidworth, practice the 'Last Post' as they prepare for a memorial service marking the opening of the exhibition tomorrow


History: Although it is usually associated with more ancient history, Stonehenge stood at the centre of what was, between 1914 and 1918, the world's largest military training camp

The humourist and cartoonist had been posted to the 34th Division headquarters on Salisbury Plain, after serving at the front and being hospitalised with shellshock following the Second Battle of Ypres.

It was while he was on Salisbury Plan that he developed his humorous series of cartoons about life in the trenches, with The Better 'Ole, depicting two soldiers in a muddy shell hole, one of the best remembered.

Bairnsfather went on to invent Old Bill, an old soldier with a trademark walrus moustache and balaclava. His cartoons achieved immense popularity because they expressed the views of the ordinary soldier in the trenches.

Lieutenant Antrobus, whose father Sir Edmund had also been a soldier, was killed in action just seventeen days after arriving at the front.

Sir Edmund, who served in the 1880s Sudan Campaign, inherited Stonehenge as part of the Amesbury Abbey estate in 1899. His son and heir landed in Belgium in 1914 and was killed in action at Ypres in October 1914. Sir Edmund died in February 1915, it was said, of a broken heart. After their deaths the grieving Lady Florence Antrobus placed the war medals of both her husband and son within an ornate cabinet along with a portrait of her son which she had painted herself.

The loss of both the owner and heir to Stonehenge lead in part to the monument being put up for sale at auction in 1915. Although there were calls for the Nation to purchase Stonehenge, it was Cecil Chubb, a locally born Barrister, who was the successful purchaser and it was he who was the last person to privately own Stonehenge.

Also on show are a number of archaeological finds including cap badges, rifle cartridges, aircraft parts and highly personal items such as a spoon and even part of a bottle of Australian hair tonic.

The special exhibition, Soldiers at Stonehenge - Salisbury Plain And The Journey To The First World War (external - login to view) opens on November 5 at the Stonehenge exhibition and visitor centre. Admission is included in the entry price for Stonehenge.


Read more: Soldiers At Stonehenge exhibition will tell story of men trained on Salisbury Plain | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter (external - login to view) | DailyMail on Facebook (external - login to view)

cool post, cool pics
 
Mowich
+2
#4
's up from me too, BL. What a moving tribute. I hope they doc it as I would love to watch the ceremony.
 
Cliffy
#5
What do the druids think of the desecration of the sacred site?
 
Blackleaf
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

What do the druids think of the desecration of the sacred site?

Stonehenge is owned by the Crown and looked after by English Heritage, not by the druids.

And there's no desecration of Stonehenge going on. English Heritage won't allow it. Most people are banned nowadays from even walking amongst the stones, save for the druids and a few assorted left-wing weirdos on the solstices, and Barack Obama.
 

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