Addressing climate change will help strengthen Ontario’s economy


mentalfloss
#1
Addressing climate change will help strengthen Ontario’s economy

After the announcement of Ontario’s new cabinet, some commentators suggested that former transportation and infrastructure minister Glen Murray had been demoted by being appointed minister of environment and climate change.

It’s true that the Ministry of Environment historically has had a small budget compared to some others. And there are still those who believe that protecting the environment is a “nice to have,” secondary to a focus on economic growth.

But the reality is addressing climate change and protecting the environment will help strengthen Ontario’s economy. Thankfully, the Liberal platform appears to recognize this.

The unprecedented recognition of climate change as a central challenge, reflected in Ontario elevating this issue to the role of a dedicated cabinet position, should mean that we will join other jurisdictions, such as B.C., California and Quebec, in putting a price on the pollution that drives global warming. Charging polluters for the pollution they create would encourage businesses to use ingenuity to reduce their costs, become more efficient and consume fewer fossil fuels.

Putting a price on carbon is the most economically efficient way to reduce emissions, which is why it has been recommended by groups as diverse as the National Round Table on Environment and Economy and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. It would also allow for reducing the tax burden on other areas such as income, something businesses and individuals alike would welcome.

As part of addressing the climate issue, we could invest in infrastructure that will help Ontario communities adapt to the levels of climate change that are now unavoidable even if we reduce emissions. According to the World Bank, these investments would create jobs and increase GDP. For Ontario, this could include mandating new development standards that ensure communities are planning for increased rainfall by creating flood prevention wetlands or the creation of disbursed hydro smart grids that are less prone to disruption during major storms.

Ontario’s government has committed to a new Great Lakes Protection Act that will set targets for reducing pollution and nutrient-laden run-off that is contaminating our rivers and lakes — a problem that will get worse with greater storm frequency and intensity caused by climate change. Not only does this impact water quality but it can lead to lost fishing and tourism revenue. To encourage positive change, we need new mechanisms. Farmers could be paid to change their farming practices to reduce run-off. Similarly, we could reward urban residents for reducing the amount of run-off from their properties through reduced fees on their water and sewage bills. These can be done in revenue neutral ways and both of these actions are in line with the government’s election platform.

Ontario’s economy can benefit from smart changes to our investment strategies that recognize and plan for pending changes to the global economy. In a world addressing climate change, the growth and decarbonization of the electrical grid is expected. Growth will come from greater demands for the electrification of trains, buses, streetcars and cars. Decarbonization is already happening as the U.S. and some Canadian provinces reduce the portion of electricity provided by coal. Ontario can help. We are well positioned to enhance our export of hydro, wind and solar electricity (all dropping rapidly in price). We can also work with Quebec, whose hydro power is the perfect battery needed for renewables to provide a baseload of power to other areas of North America.

As the world takes climate change more seriously, it’s not just what powers our homes that’s changing. What powers our cars is changing, too. The electric car industry is growing quickly. Ontario manufactures 20 per cent of the automobiles produced in North America. This industry is critical to our economic prosperity and focused strategies to attract the emerging electric vehicle industry will help the province’s manufacturing sector today and pay dividends for generations to come.

Finally, support for local and organic food will help farmers in this fast-growing industry that provides jobs to thousands of Ontarians. Creating Ontario’s first Food Belt in the GTA and expanding the Greenbelt will help to protect the region’s rich farmland for future agricultural growth. Moves to address the impacts of toxic chemicals on the biodiversity that sustains this industry will ensure that we have local, high quality food for Ontarians and for export. The government’s commitments during the election suggest an intention to act in these areas.

Addressing environmental issues is demonstrably the key to a smart, economically robust investment strategy for Ontario and Canada. If Murray can lead on this, those early commentators will soon see he has been given the biggest and most important job in cabinet.

http://m.thestar.com/#/article/opini...s_economy.html
 
Walter
+2
#2  Top Rated Post
The problem is that libtards believe this scheiss. (Rhymes with nice.)
 
mentalfloss
#3
Sure if you think Harper is a libtard.

But then again you think NP is a lefty rag so I'm not surprised.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+2
#4
Read the article and the take-away was this.

  1. A carbon tax will help the economy.. Everyone knows that taxes are great mechanisms for growth.
  2. Spend tax dollars on infrastructure for electric buses and trains.
  3. Force(?) the auto sector to manufacture electric cars that n one is buying
 
mentalfloss
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Read the article and the take-away was this.

  1. A carbon tax will help the economy.. Everyone knows that taxes are great mechanisms for growth.
  2. Spend tax dollars on infrastructure for electric buses and trains.
  3. Force(?) the auto sector to manufacture electric cars that n one is buying

1. The stimulus that's brought the economy back from recession was taxpayers money

2. And?

3. The costs would come down with investment and the article does not state anyone is forcing anything.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

1. The stimulus that's brought the economy back from recession was taxpayers money

2. And?

3. The costs would come down with investment and the article does not state anyone is forcing anything.

  1. Like Solyndra?
  2. Ummm, you already have perfectly good buses and trains?
  3. The public has already spoken in terms that they won't be buying them.
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+1
#7
The first sentence in the OP is correct. The sooner politicians address this tax scam for what it is the sooner they can get on with repairing the economy.
The rest of the article is partisan drivel by people that want us to become another third world country where there are two clases of people. The rich rooling political class and the poor working class.
 
mentalfloss
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

  1. Like Solyndra?
  2. Ummm, you already have perfectly good buses and trains?
  3. The public has already spoken in terms that they won't be buying them.

1. Umm. Like the whole fricken Canadian economy?

2. They're not perfectly good?

3. It's only 2014. We are talking about initiatives that will require decades to get to a saleable market.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

1. Umm. Like the whole fricken Canadian economy?

2. They're not perfectly good?

3. It's only 2014. We are talking about initiatives that will require decades to get to a saleable market.

  1. The stimulus to the 'whole fricken Canadian economy' was not founded on useless, unproven green initiatives
  2. Exactly. They are perfectly good and your grand plan is to replace/retool them... If it ain't broke, don't fix it
  3. Great.. So, your proposal is to assume increasing amount of debt 'for decades' and hope you backed a winner... Reeks of bankruptcy to me
 
petros
+1
#10
I'd like to know how much MentalFlaws has paid out of pocket to green up his own lifestyle and what those initiative are/were?
 
mentalfloss
#11
The private sector is already making the necessary changes to prepare for upcoming costs because it will affect the bottom line.

Industry to focus on the effects of climate change on infrastructure with new minister

Leaders in Ontario’s construction industry are looking forward to working with the new expanded Ministry of Environment and Climate Change in the hopes of addressing the impacts extreme weather events have on infrastructure.

Though Consulting Engineers of Ontario (CEO) has not traditionally worked with the Ministry of Environment on a regular basis, the organization expects to now be more involved with the ministry since it has expanded to include climate change. Glen Murray will take on the portfolio.

“We’ll be meeting with Minister Murray to start thinking about how do we start planning in the long term for the impact that climate change has on infrastructure and what do we have to do within our sector to be prepared to start folding the concept of climate change into the concept of long term infrastructure planning,” said CEO chief executive officer Barry Steinberg.

Industry to focus on the effects of climate change on infrastructure with new minister – Daily Commercial News (external - login to view)
 
petros
+1
#12
Adding more culverts?
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Adding more culverts?

I'm thinking about closing the windows when I get the A/C thumping away on high... That's getting ready, right?
 
petros
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

I'm thinking about closing the windows when I get the A/C thumping away on high... That's getting ready, right?

It's July and I haven't used the AC yet. The heat pump is still kicking in the early morning hours. It would be nice to sink some heat in the ground for next winter but I doubt that is going to happen.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#15
Global warming has struck again
 
petros
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Global warming has struck again

PS. My geothermal didn't cost me a penny thanks to green greed (600% mark up) and eco subsidies. I pocketed $6K in taxpayer money by importing the heat pump and drilling my own sink. I then bought 400 2'x4' used R20 roofing grade SM styro for $1 a piece, insulated the basement walls, the roof and my garage, sold the remaing 180 piece for $5 a pop on kijiji. $1800 paid by taxpayers and $500 made from selling the surplus put my cheque total from the feds $6800. Free heat and free insulation plus cash.

Thank you Canada.
 
Nuggler
#17
Nice, Petros; but what about the restuvus who don't have drills.

My little rechargeable wouldn't last too long.
 
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