B.C. premier warned to stand firm against Northern Gateway or face LNG backlash


mentalfloss
#1
B.C. premier warned to stand firm against Northern Gateway project or face LNG backlash

The day after Ottawa approved the $7.9-billion Northern Gateway pipeline, some B.C. aboriginal leaders warned Premier Christy Clark to stand firm against the project or risk jeopardizing First Nations’ support for LNG.

Clark has pinned her growth strategy for B.C. on liquefied natural gas, banking on five plants supporting 75,000 jobs and fuelling an $100-billion prosperity fund. (Analysts, however, suggest there will likely only be one or two built).

First Nations in B.C. have been much more open to LNG, while many are vehemently opposed to oil projects. Some are already in talks on LNG with the province and companies about environmental concerns and sharing in economic benefits. In contrast, First Nations have launched a legal action to stop the Enbridge’s Northern Gateway project.

The Enbridge “debacle” isn’t going to be helpful to the LNG dialogue, said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of B.C. Indian chiefs.

“First Nations are watching very, very closely,” Phillip said Wednesday. “In the event Premier Clark weasels from the five conditions, I think it will send a very negative message to First Nations vis-à-vis LNG discussions.”

After the federal government approval Tuesday of Northern Gateway, the B.C. premier and her environment minister, Mary Polak, said the project had not met the province’s conditions. Those include a world-leading oil spill prevention and response system on land and on the sea, addressing First Nation rights and a fair share of economic benefits.

Polak said B.C. would refuse permits if the conditions are not met. About 60 permits are needed in B.C. to construct the project.

On Wednesday, Polak said in a written statement that the province and First Nations had demonstrated an ability to work together on LNG. “We will continue to strengthen our relationship by listening to concerns, by building a respectful dialogue and by building trust,” she said.

Coastal First Nations executive director Art Sterritt said the risk is real that the federal approval of Northern Gateway could endanger negotiations with First Nations in northern B.C. on the future of LNG development.

“(The federal government) has now left it to Premier Clark to make the situation clear, and to preserve a wider dialogue and considerations of resource development in B.C.,” said Sterrit.

Added Carrier Sekani Tribal Council tribal chief Terry Teegee: “If the provincial government comes down and approves (Northern Gateway), that could jeopardize LNG projects.”

Still, some First Nations are likely to continue talks on LNG.

First Nations are more open to natural gas pipelines than oil pipelines because, they say, in a worst-case scenario the gas will evaporate if a pipe bursts.

In April, two First Nations signed the first revenue-sharing agreement with B.C. over the proposed Aurora LNG development on their traditional territories near Prince Rupert. The deal with the Metlakatla and Lax Kw’alaams nations could be worth $15 million.

First Nations believe there may be able to ink deals for as much as $600 million per LNG project, a point laid out in a discussion paper produced by the B.C. First Nations Energy and Mining Council.

Jody Wilson-Raybould, B.C. regional chief for the Assembly of First Nations, said LNG remains a very different and more positive prospect for many First Nations than heavy oil.

“At least with LNG, there are discussions that are happening where voices are being heard and concerns are being addressed,” she said.

Wilson-Raybould said, however, that there is no doubt that more work is needed by the B.C. and federal governments to build better relationships with First Nations.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper special envoy, Doug Eyford, bluntly concluded earlier this year there had been no constructive dialogue between First Nations and the federal government on pipelines. He said Ottawa must build trust with First Nations.

B.C. premier warned to stand firm against Northern Gateway project or face LNG backlash (external - login to view)
 
petros
#2
First Nations had better read the NEB Act Section 27 or they are going to find out the hard way that not negotiating with pipeline companies brings on a much much sh-ttier situation. By not signing they take on liabilities such as clean up after a leak that would have fell on the pipeline company's shoulders and they will only be paid minimum rates for the right of way with zero recourse in the future. IF they aren't relocated first.

The NEB getting involved will forever cripple any hopes for land claims.
 
EagleSmack
+1
#3
 
petros
+3
#4  Top Rated Post
Quote:

First Nations are more open to natural gas pipelines than oil pipelines because, they say, in a worst-case scenario the gas will evaporate if a pipe bursts

.Holy f-ck are they ever out to lunch. That is one of the stupidest things they've stated to date.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#5
Tells you exactly who believes are running the province of BC.... It's a wonder that these FN groups even allow elections in the first place.
 
petros
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Tells you exactly who believes are running the province of BC.... It's a wonder that these FN groups even allow elections in the first place.

All because of a 1970 commercial. FNs never were and never will be "keepers of the earth" as depicted in the 1970s commercial about littering.

httpmyoutubecomwatchvj7OHG7tHrNM

 
B00Mer
Republican
#7
so.....BC First Nations support LNG because they are getting a cut for doing nothing...and don't support Northern Gateway because they are not????

Northern Gateway: You don’t build a nation by saying ‘No’ - The Globe and Mail

I think we need a civil war, Liberals against Conservatives.. and being Liberals don't believe in guns, the Conservatives already have an advantage..
 
petros
+1
#8
BC Indians don't want investment in Canada. They'd have no excuses to not get jobs, might miss a bingo, or have to stop growing indoor weed because industry needs the hydro.

When indoor weed is no longer BCs biggest user of energy, they might have a wee bit of credibility when it comes to giving a sh-t about the environment.
 
Locutus
#9
the TIDES are high.
 
petros
#10
It's more than just TIDES. It's the entire natural gas industry competing with oil. They've even gone as far as creating the global warming myth to get taxpayers to fund their pipelines, powerplants, pumping stations and the consumers costs of converting to NG because NG will save us all from certain death from AGW.

It's obvious the BC Paiutes fell for their bullsh-t hook, line and sphincter.
 
Locutus
+1
#11
Greenpeace launders money thru Tides, which keeps donors secret. Why?
 
petros
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by LocutusView Post

Greenpeace launders money thru Tides, which keeps donors secret. Why?

Because they don't want to reveal it's NG companies and those who stand to make piss pots of free taxpayer cash like GE.
 
Zipperfish
No Party Affiliation
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

First Nations had better read the NEB Act Section 27 or they are going to find out the hard way that not negotiating with pipeline companies brings on a much much sh-ttier situation. By not signing they take on liabilities such as clean up after a leak that would have fell on the pipeline company's shoulders and they will only be paid minimum rates for the right of way with zero recourse in the future. IF they aren't relocated first.

The NEB getting involved will forever cripple any hopes for land claims.

The Constitution trumps the NEB Act.
 
petros
#14
No it doesn't. Nobody in Canada has private property. No private property means no property rights.

Read the Act. They are screwed if it goes to arbitration. Going to arbitration doesn't stop the building either. They will get a lump payment of what the Govt has outlined as the minimum and zero recourse.
 
Zipperfish
No Party Affiliation
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

No it doesn't. .

Yes it does. The Constitution is the supreme law of Canada. Consultations with aboriginals are a constitutional duty, as the courts have said repeatedly.
 
Locutus
#16
(external - login to view)
Ezra Levant ‏@ezralevant (external - login to view)

Since 2009, San Francisco's Tides Foundation alone has given @GreenpeaceCA (external - login to view) $526,000.

That's money with the original source hidden. Gazprom?
 
mentalfloss
#17
That's it?
 

Similar Threads

36
Northern Gateway not a sure thing, Harper says
by mentalfloss | Jan 14th, 2014
50
BC rejects Northern Gateway proposal
by Locutus | Jun 1st, 2013
111
Northern Gateway pipeline opposed by 50% in B.C
by mentalfloss | May 30th, 2012
14
Northern Gateway may be a Railroad
by jjaycee98 | Jan 30th, 2012
no new posts