Some Tim Hortons Cancell Paid Breaks in Ont over wage hike


tay
#1
A Toronto-area Tim Hortons worker, who didn’t want her name or outlet location identified for fear of reprisals, said her employer posted a memo notifying staff he was ending breaks with pay to recoup costs.



“Given this new increase, as well as continued economic and competitive pressures, increasing commodity costs and minimal increases in menu pricing, effective June 1, we will be shifting all hourly team members in the restaurant to unpaid breaks,” the memo reads.


A spokeswoman for Tim Hortons said these decisions are made at the franchise level by each individual Tim Hortons restaurant owner, consistent with provincial labour regulations.

Under Ontario’s Employment Standards Act, employers are required to give workers a 30-minute unpaid meal break after five consecutive hours of work.




Ontario’s minimum wage jumps to $11 Sunday | Toronto Star





On Sunday The Toronto Star reported that a Tim Hortons franchisee is eliminating paid breaks for his/her employees as retaliation against the June 1 increase of the minimum wage in Ontario to $11 per hour. Yesterday, I sent off a letter to the head office of the coffee and donut emporium. I would encourage others for whom this is an issue to do the same.

Here is that letter:

To Whom It May Concern:

It was with great dismay that I learned in Sunday's Toronto Star that some Tim Hortons' franchisees are retaliating against the new Ontario minimum wage by eliminating paid breaks for employees. An owner's memo released by an employee stated:

“Given this new increase, as well as continued economic and competitive pressures, increasing commodity costs and minimal increases in menu pricing, effective June 1, we will be shifting all hourly team members in the restaurant to unpaid breaks.”

While I imagine this news is most disheartening to the many who faithfully and cheerfully serve your products, you should be aware that it is also very distressing to consumers who care about workers' rates of remuneration and working conditions and try to make ethical decisions in their discretionary purchases. I am one such person among many.

Your corporate response cited in The Star, that these decisions are made at the franchise level by each individual Tim Hortons restaurant owner, consistent with provincial labour regulations, was unsatisfactory in the extreme for many reasons.

Tim Hortons has long marketed itself as a Canadian institution and icon that we should all revere as patriotic citizens. Who can forget the role your coffee and donut emporium has played over the years in bringing caffeine comfort to early-morning hockey dads, sending underprivileged kids to camp, and being in the most desolate of locations, including Afghanistan 'supporting our troops.'

Sad to say, all of that iconography rings hollow when head office absolves itself of any responsibility for the actions of its franchisees. To hide behind legalities, deferring to provincial regulations and decision-making protocols, conveys an air of corporate indifference and avarice, not leadership.

There is no doubt in my mind that should this controversy have a negative effect on your very profitable operations, the lamentations about price pressures cited by the above-quoted Toronto operator notwithstanding, you would use your influence to rectify this unacceptable gouging of your employees.

As one very active in social media and blogging, I intend to spread the word about this egregiously unfair situation as widely as I can. My purpose, of course, is to encourage as many as possible to boycott Tim Hortons until equity is restored.

I look forward to hearing from you on this matter.

.................................................. .................................
Should you feel so moved to express your views about the company's mistreatment of its employees, here is the link (external - login to view).












 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+2
#2
Why should they be paid for breaks?
 
Sal
No Party Affiliation
+2
#3
much ado about nothing, they are abiding by the labour laws, they paid them prior although they did not have to, now they aren't going to
 
EagleSmack
+1
#4
I hope they are enjoying the hike in pay though.
 
Kreskin
#5
Paid lunches before?.. I call horsebaloney on that claim.
 
EagleSmack
#6
Workers are in the US are feeling it too.


BLOG: What SeaTac tells us about $15 minimum wage » Northwest Asian Weekly | (external - login to view)


$15 Minimum wage =


No more free parking
No more Overtime
No more free food


“I lost my 401k, health insurance, paid holiday, and vacation,” she responded. “No more free food,” she added.


Enjoy! Enjoy!
 
Kreskin
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

Workers are in the US are feeling it too.


BLOG: What SeaTac tells us about $15 minimum wage » Northwest Asian Weekly | (external - login to view)


$15 Minimum wage =


No more free parking
No more Overtime
No more free food


“I lost my 401k, health insurance, paid holiday, and vacation,” she responded. “No more free food,” she added.


Enjoy! Enjoy!

Frankly, even if it is the case it's really a good time to leave. Most good and successful employers treat staff extremely well. Certainly not with that kind of disdain. Yet, if the employer wants to penalize staff for getting a wage then those will certainly make up for paid parking by taking from the till. That's the kind of thing that happens when staff lose respect for employers.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
+1
#8
Really rotten coffee, leathal doughnuts and USA sauceage slabs loaded with biojunk. I\ve scraped TH off my resturaunt list a while ago. Fast drivthrough though.
 
damngrumpy
No Party Affiliation
#9
I see all this rage about fifteen dollar minimum wage and I wonder what the hell is wrong
with this picture. Fifteen bucks eh? I have paid more than fifteen bucks for a long time
for farm work. No more parking and breaks. We don't hear the outrage when company
guys get huge wages and free parking and god knows what else.
Has the employer class become a bunch of skinflints? I guess so. You would think the
world was coming to an end over fifteen bucks. One thing I remember years ago when
the wage was five or six bucks I would leave my yard for that and I sure as hell wouldn't
work for fifteen bucks an hour either.
The excuse is oh its entry level work. The old excuse was we can pay women less
because the husband or father should be looking after them.

The one thing that is silly is if people get a raise some employers want to
take their benefits away to get even what a load of crap.
It is time for some employers to grow up paying your employees is part of
doing business
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+2
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

I see all this rage about fifteen dollar minimum wage and I wonder what the hell is wrong
with this picture. Fifteen bucks eh? I have paid more than fifteen bucks for a long time
for farm work. No more parking and breaks. We don't hear the outrage when company
guys get huge wages and free parking and god knows what else.
Has the employer class become a bunch of skinflints? I guess so. You would think the
world was coming to an end over fifteen bucks. One thing I remember years ago when
the wage was five or six bucks I would leave my yard for that and I sure as hell wouldn't
work for fifteen bucks an hour either.
The excuse is oh its entry level work. The old excuse was we can pay women less
because the husband or father should be looking after them.

The one thing that is silly is if people get a raise some employers want to
take their benefits away to get even what a load of crap.
It is time for some employers to grow up paying your employees is part of
doing business

$15/hr times 10 staff is $150/hr just for wages. Haven't paid rent, supplies or franchise fees yet.
 
BornRuff
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

$15/hr times 10 staff is $150/hr just for wages. Haven't paid rent, supplies or franchise fees yet.

Those employees are also ostensibly working for you and making you money every hour they are working.

In every economic change, there are winners and loser. The test isn't if you can find one sad case. The test is if people are better off overall. For every employer that does something like this, there will be others that don't and lots of people making more money.

Prices may change depending on how much the increase in wages is, but the fact is that if current prices don't support a living wage, then prices are too low.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

I see all this rage about fifteen dollar minimum wage and I wonder what the hell is wrong
with this picture. Fifteen bucks eh? I have paid more than fifteen bucks for a long time
for farm work. No more parking and breaks. We don't hear the outrage when company
guys get huge wages and free parking and god knows what else.
Has the employer class become a bunch of skinflints? I guess so. You would think the
world was coming to an end over fifteen bucks. One thing I remember years ago when
the wage was five or six bucks I would leave my yard for that and I sure as hell wouldn't
work for fifteen bucks an hour either.
The excuse is oh its entry level work. The old excuse was we can pay women less
because the husband or father should be looking after them.

The one thing that is silly is if people get a raise some employers want to
take their benefits away to get even what a load of crap.
It is time for some employers to grow up paying your employees is part of
doing business


I think I know where that's going. I stop at A & W two or three times a week for coffee.............$1.25 a cup, when it gets higher than that I'll either drink it at home or at the bowling alley where it's 65 cents for seniors and $1.10 for everyone else. Timmy just won't be able to complete at $15 an hour.
 
BornRuff
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

I think I know where that's going. I stop at A & W two or three times a week for coffee.............$1.25 a cup, when it gets higher than that I'll either drink it at home or at the bowling alley where it's 65 cents for seniors and $1.10 for everyone else. Timmy just won't be able to complete at $15 an hour.

Well, if the minimum goes up, they will be on a level playing field.

Not that many people are willing to change their habits over nickels and dimes though. Some people wont be happy about it, but if it allows enough people to climb above the poverty line, it may be worth it.

Having minimum wages so low in many cases equates to having the government subsidize the wages, since anyone relying on that wage to support themselves, or good forbid a family, will require a lot of support from the government. Whenever possible, businesses should pull their own weight.
 
Kreskin
#14
I usually stop at Tim Hortons for a coffee after the gym. Not tonight. I thought it would help the staff get an unpaid break.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by BornRuffView Post

Well, if the minimum goes up, they will be on a level playing field.

Not that many people are willing to change their habits over nickels and dimes though. Some people wont be happy about it, but if it allows enough people to climb above the poverty line, it may be worth it.

Having minimum wages so low in many cases equates to having the government subsidize the wages, since anyone relying on that wage to support themselves, or good forbid a family, will require a lot of support from the government. Whenever possible, businesses should pull their own weight.


They'll be on a level "playing field" all right, still below the poverty line buying $5 coffees. Just like boats on the water when the the tide comes in! -
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

I see all this rage about fifteen dollar minimum wage and I wonder what the hell is wrong
with this picture. Fifteen bucks eh?

Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

$15/hr times 10 staff is $150/hr just for wages. Haven't paid rent, supplies or franchise fees yet.

Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

I think I know where that's going. I stop at A & W two or three times a week for coffee.............$1.25 a cup, when it gets higher than that I'll either drink it at home or at the bowling alley where it's 65 cents for seniors and $1.10 for everyone else. Timmy just won't be able to complete at $15 an hour.

Just to be clear, $15/hour is from the story that Eagle posted. The minimum wage increase in Ontario was a $0.50 increase from $10.50/hour to $11.00/hour.

Dollar wise staff are down about $2.75 on a five hour shift. Assuming everyone is paid minimum wage of course.

Under employment law in Ontario employers are not required to pay for breaks, they are required to provide for an unpaid 30 minute break after five hours.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+2
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

$15/hr times 10 staff is $150/hr just for wages. Haven't paid rent, supplies or franchise fees yet.

That hourly figure does not account for payroll taxes, employer contributions to EI, CPP, etc.

The safe rule of thumb (in Canada) is to add 25%-30% to the wage that the employee receives and that # is what it actually costs the employer
 
BornRuff
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

They'll be on a level "playing field" all right, still below the poverty line buying $5 coffees. Just like boats on the water when the the tide comes in! -

Minimum wage workers are only employed by certain companies, so you would not see a direct one to one increase in prices along with the minimum wage. Something like fast food would be more greatly impacted, but that really isn't an essential part of anyone's budget. Stuff like rent and utilities wouldn't really be effected, and that is a huge part of the average budget.

Now, this isn't to say that a higher minimum is always better. We would have to find a sweet spot that balances the benefits to low wage workers against increased prices.
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

That hourly figure does not account for payroll taxes, employer contributions to EI, CPP, etc.

The safe rule of thumb (in Canada) is to add 25%-30% to the wage that the employee receives and that # is what it actually costs the employer

I' trying to keep it simple for the business illiterates. We used 1.4% of wage rate for payroll cost. In BC employees are entitled to a 10 min paid break every two hrs. And 1/2 hr unpaid lunch break.
Now it also depends on where the store is as to how much they can really aford to pay in wages. In a depressed economy such as high unemployment or large retirement population wages will be low and return tothe owner probably is as well. Where there is work sales are booming and fat food joints are forced to pay better just to get staff.
In our camp here in Kitamat even the cookhouse staff, who are mostly locals buy boxes of coffee from timmies instead of drinking the free grunge they feed us.
 
BornRuff
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

That hourly figure does not account for payroll taxes, employer contributions to EI, CPP, etc.

The safe rule of thumb (in Canada) is to add 25%-30% to the wage that the employee receives and that # is what it actually costs the employer

Doesn't that figure usually assume they are providing benefits?
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by BornRuffView Post

Minimum wage workers are only employed by certain companies, so you would not see a direct one to one increase in prices along with the minimum wage. Something like fast food would be more greatly impacted, but that really isn't an essential part of anyone's budget. Stuff like rent and utilities wouldn't really be effected, and that is a huge part of the average budget.

Now, this isn't to say that a higher minimum is always better. We would have to find a sweet spot that balances the benefits to low wage workers against increased prices.


When minimum wage goes up what do you think happens to the guy's wage who is earning 10 cents above minimum wage?
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by BornRuffView Post

Doesn't that figure usually assume they are providing benefits?

Yes and no.

Other than income tax, take a look at your next pay cheque and add up the source deductions you pay. The employer has an obligation to meet similar/same costs on your behalf.

It adds-up super quick

SLM ought to weigh-in on this. She would have definitive answers
 
BornRuff
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Yes and no.

Other than income tax, take a look at your next pay cheque and add up the source deductions you pay. The employer has an obligation to meet similar/same costs on your behalf.

It adds-up super quick

SLM ought to weigh-in on this. She would have definitive answers

CPP is 4.95%, EI is 2.632%(for the employer). What else are you talking about?

Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

When minimum wage goes up what do you think happens to the guy's wage who is earning 10 cents above minimum wage?

I guess I wasn't clear, but I include those people in what I am talking about. Most "minimum wage" employers pay a lot, if not most, of their employees slightly above the actual minimum, but often not all that much.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by BornRuffView Post

CPP is 4.95%, EI is 2.632%(for the employer). What else are you talking about?


Contributions to Prov (employment) taxes, healthcare premiums (where applicable), WCB, any benefits offered.

In the case of Tim Hortons and many other employers, what amounted to paid meal breaks and any and all costs that are associated with an employer's mandated, negotiated or offerings to attract and retain employees.

This isn't that hard.. Look into it at your own work place
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+2
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by BornRuffView Post

Doesn't that figure usually assume they are providing benefits?

EI & CPP are non-optional benefits required to be paid by all employers. They deduct some from the cheque but they have to add an employer contribution as well. It is % of salary, so if they salary goes up so do the contributions (to a cap).

Wynn is also going to add a forced pension deduction (tax) as well as an employer contribution to the wages if she gets back in as well.

ETA: I am not arguing against increasing minimum wage ... just recognizing there are costs involved. Quite frankly if you are working and not sucking welfare dollars you should be able to live on that wage.
 
BornRuff
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

EI & CPP are non-optional benefits required to be paid by all employers. They deduct some from the cheque but they have to add an employer contribution as well. It is % of salary, so if they salary goes up so do the contributions (to a cap).

Few people really refer to having EI and CPP at work as a "benefit". When I had my first job that paid minimum wage, I certainly didn't say that my job included "benefits".

They certainly don't add up to 20%-30% of the salary.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by BornRuffView Post

Few people really refer to having EI and CPP at work as a "benefit". When I had my first job that paid minimum wage, I certainly didn't say that my job included "benefits".

They certainly don't add up to 20%-30% of the salary.

I think there is also a McSquinty heath tax also included.
 
BornRuff
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

In the case of Tim Hortons and many other employers, what amounted to paid meal breaks and any and all costs that are associated with an employer's mandated, negotiated or offerings to attract and retain employees.

When I asked "Doesn't that assume that they are providing benefits", why didn't you just say "yes". Clearly when you refer to that 20%-30% number, you are referring to benefits above what is legally mandated by law.

I think it is pretty safe to assume that employers that are impacted by the minimum wage are more than likely providing very minimal, if any, benefits.

Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

I think there is also a McSquinty heath tax also included.

Yeah, it appears to be between ~1 and ~2 percent, based on overall payroll.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by BornRuffView Post

When I asked "Doesn't that assume that they are providing benefits", why didn't you just say "yes". Clearly when you refer to that 20%-30% number, you are referring to benefits above what is legally mandated by law.

I think it is pretty safe to assume that employers that are impacted by the minimum wage are more than likely providing very minimal, if any, benefits.

There is more than just EI/CPP that is mandated champ.

Look into it instead of perpetually spouting unsubstantiated points.

Ask the HR/payroll where you work and they can give you the definitive answer
 
BornRuff
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

There is more than just EI/CPP that is mandated champ.

Look into it instead of perpetually spouting unsubstantiated points.

Ask the HR/payroll where you work and they can give you the definitive answer

Sure, I never disagreed that there was more than just EI/CPP. The point is that the mandated stuff is nowhere near 20%-30%. That figure that is often cited includes benefits on top of what is mandated, which likely isn't a common issue for minimum wage employers.
 

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