Obesity surgery demand leaps in Canada


mentalfloss
#1
Weight-loss surgeries leap in Canada, study says

Bariatric surgery, or weight loss surgery, in Canada has jumped four-fold since 2006-07 and a new study says the health-care system has made great strides to meet the demand.


Vertical sleeve gastrectomy removes about 80 to 85 per cent of the stomach.(Shutterstock)
"One in 5 Canadian adults has obesity — and with those rates continuing to grow, so too will the need to understand the implications for the health-care system," said Kathleen Morris of the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), which released a report Thursday about the massive surge in bariatric surgeries in the country.

The study said 6,000 bariatric surgeries were performed in the country's hospitals in 2012-13 compared with the 1,600 in 2006-07. Eight out of 10 patients are women.

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Christine Garrison, 46, was told in 2010 that she would have a five- to six-year wait for the surgery. The Nova Scotia woman, who weighs 421 pounds, says she struggles just "to do simple things in life."

"The weight would not come off at all no matter what I tried," Garrison told CBC News. "I'm not one of those people who drink pop and chips and chocolate bars."

Despite improvements in wait times, demand remains high, especially in Atlantic Canada where resources are struggling to keep up with need.

"People who are living on the East Coast may be waiting between five to 10 years," Dr. Yoni Freedhoff told CBC News. Freedhoff is with the Bariatric Medical Institute in Ottawa and contributed to the report.

"Whereas in Ontario, they may only have to wait for six months.…We need better access across the board."

A new epidemic
The report highlights the efforts of the Ontario Bariatric Network, created in 2009. It has four centres of excellence across the province including regional assessment and treatment centres, allowing for more surgeries to occur. But it's a different story in Nova Scotia.

"The epidemic is relatively new, so we haven't prepared for it," points out Tom Ransom, an endocrinologist at the Queen Elizabeth Health Science Centre in Halifax. "You need a lot of operating time, room and physicians qualified to do these procedures."

The three types of bariatric surgery covered by health-care plans include:

Adjustable gastric banding: a flexible band is placed around the upper portion of the stomach.
Sleeve gastrectomy: about 80 to 85 per cent of the stomach is removed.
Gastric bypass: the size of the stomach is reduced and a part of the small intestine is bypassed.
The CIHI report says the outcomes have been good. Six per cent of patients were readmitted into hospital within 30 days of their procedure. That is down from nine per cent in 2006-07. The rate is also comparable for all surgical patients in Canada.

"These procedures absolutely improve people's health and qualities of life," said Freedhoff.


Obesity is associated with health risks such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer, with costs in Canada between $4.6 billion and $7.1 billion(Associated Press)
A recent study of patients who have done the surgery, conducted by the Cleveland Clinic and published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found improvements in patients with Type 2 diabetes three years after the procedure. The study also found that patients had a reduced need for high blood pressure and cholesterol medicines.

"I'd be happy if I lost 50 pounds," said Garrison, who can hardly walk. "After two or three minutes of standing, I get pains in my back and legs.… It'd be a whole new life for me."

Side-effects
However, the report contains a few cautionary notes.

Mortality rates range from 0.1 to two per cent. In addition, there is a potential of a "wide range of problems after surgery" including ulcers, bowel obstructions, gallstones and excessive scar tissue formations.

The report also expresses concern about the growing rates of obesity in Canada and the continuing leap in numbers of people who could require bariatric surgery. The cost of the 6,000 bariatric surgeries is tabbed at $48 million.

It said that a number of Canadians chose to pay out-of-pocket for the surgery within Canada and outside of the country.

A recent study from Memorial University in St. John's predicted that about 21 per cent of Canadian adults will be obese by 2019.

Obesity to overtake smoking as worst heart disease risk factor
Obesity, defined as a BMI of 30 or higher, is associated with health risks such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer, with annual costs in Canada between $4.6 billion and $7.1 billion.

Normal weight is classified as a BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 while overweight as BMI of 25 to 29.9.

In the end, Freedhoff says, there is larger issue at stake: prevention. He says the environment we live in — easy access to sugar-laden foods and lack of exercise — is contributing to the problem.

Weight-loss surgeries leap in Canada, study says
 
JamesBondo
+1
#2
Well, it didn't work for me. I'm only 30lbs lighter and $20,000 poorer from a clinic in Ontario. The fullness that it creates is present yet different than the fullness from a large meal, hence, I've learned to wash my food down which of course undermines the mechanism for weightloss.
 
mentalfloss
+2
#3  Top Rated Post
It's the Western fat diet.

We lack discipline.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Weight-loss surgeries leap in Canada, study says

Bariatric surgery, or weight loss surgery, in Canada has jumped four-fold since 2006-07 and a new study says the health-care system has made great strides to meet the demand.


Vertical sleeve gastrectomy removes about 80 to 85 per cent of the stomach.(Shutterstock)
"One in 5 Canadian adults has obesity — and with those rates continuing to grow, so too will the need to understand the implications for the health-care system," said Kathleen Morris of the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), which released a report Thursday about the massive surge in bariatric surgeries in the country.

The study said 6,000 bariatric surgeries were performed in the country's hospitals in 2012-13 compared with the 1,600 in 2006-07. Eight out of 10 patients are women.

Obesity now recognized as a disease
7 obesity myths shattered
Children's weight affected by bedroom TVs, active gaming
Christine Garrison, 46, was told in 2010 that she would have a five- to six-year wait for the surgery. The Nova Scotia woman, who weighs 421 pounds, says she struggles just "to do simple things in life."

"The weight would not come off at all no matter what I tried," Garrison told CBC News. "I'm not one of those people who drink pop and chips and chocolate bars."

Despite improvements in wait times, demand remains high, especially in Atlantic Canada where resources are struggling to keep up with need.

"People who are living on the East Coast may be waiting between five to 10 years," Dr. Yoni Freedhoff told CBC News. Freedhoff is with the Bariatric Medical Institute in Ottawa and contributed to the report.

"Whereas in Ontario, they may only have to wait for six months.…We need better access across the board."

A new epidemic
The report highlights the efforts of the Ontario Bariatric Network, created in 2009. It has four centres of excellence across the province including regional assessment and treatment centres, allowing for more surgeries to occur. But it's a different story in Nova Scotia.

"The epidemic is relatively new, so we haven't prepared for it," points out Tom Ransom, an endocrinologist at the Queen Elizabeth Health Science Centre in Halifax. "You need a lot of operating time, room and physicians qualified to do these procedures."

The three types of bariatric surgery covered by health-care plans include:

Adjustable gastric banding: a flexible band is placed around the upper portion of the stomach.
Sleeve gastrectomy: about 80 to 85 per cent of the stomach is removed.
Gastric bypass: the size of the stomach is reduced and a part of the small intestine is bypassed.
The CIHI report says the outcomes have been good. Six per cent of patients were readmitted into hospital within 30 days of their procedure. That is down from nine per cent in 2006-07. The rate is also comparable for all surgical patients in Canada.

"These procedures absolutely improve people's health and qualities of life," said Freedhoff.


Obesity is associated with health risks such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer, with costs in Canada between $4.6 billion and $7.1 billion(Associated Press)
A recent study of patients who have done the surgery, conducted by the Cleveland Clinic and published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found improvements in patients with Type 2 diabetes three years after the procedure. The study also found that patients had a reduced need for high blood pressure and cholesterol medicines.

"I'd be happy if I lost 50 pounds," said Garrison, who can hardly walk. "After two or three minutes of standing, I get pains in my back and legs.… It'd be a whole new life for me."

Side-effects
However, the report contains a few cautionary notes.

Mortality rates range from 0.1 to two per cent. In addition, there is a potential of a "wide range of problems after surgery" including ulcers, bowel obstructions, gallstones and excessive scar tissue formations.

The report also expresses concern about the growing rates of obesity in Canada and the continuing leap in numbers of people who could require bariatric surgery. The cost of the 6,000 bariatric surgeries is tabbed at $48 million.

It said that a number of Canadians chose to pay out-of-pocket for the surgery within Canada and outside of the country.

A recent study from Memorial University in St. John's predicted that about 21 per cent of Canadian adults will be obese by 2019.

Obesity to overtake smoking as worst heart disease risk factor
Obesity, defined as a BMI of 30 or higher, is associated with health risks such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer, with annual costs in Canada between $4.6 billion and $7.1 billion.

Normal weight is classified as a BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 while overweight as BMI of 25 to 29.9.

In the end, Freedhoff says, there is larger issue at stake: prevention. He says the environment we live in — easy access to sugar-laden foods and lack of exercise — is contributing to the problem.

Weight-loss surgeries leap in Canada, study says

Wouldn't limiting intake to 2000 calories per day and doing 11/2 hours of strenuous exercise work better than surgery? Isn't unnecessary surgery unethical?
 
Twila
+2
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

It's the Western fat diet.

We lack discipline.

I'd say it's the sugar in everything that does it. Combined with the low nutrient value in processed food. That and we've forgotten to be satisfied with satiated. Instead most people go for the busting gut full and undoing their pants.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

I'd say it's the sugar in everything that does it. Combined with the low nutrient value in processed food. That and we've forgotten to be satisfied with satiated. Instead most people go for the busting gut full and undoing their pants.

You've absolutely hit the nail on the head there, Twila. Timmy Horton certainly hasn't done Canadians any favours. Perhaps it's time a big surtax was imposed on the likes of them and Big Mac..........just big enough to put them right out of business! Also a 50% tax on bags of white sugar.
 
Twila
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

You've absolutely hit the nail on the head there, Twila. Timmy Horton certainly hasn't done Canadians any favours. Perhaps it's time a big surtax was imposed on the likes of them and Big Mac..........just big enough to put them right out of business! Also a 50% tax on bags of white sugar.

Except that just about every single thing you buy from the grocery store has added sugar. Bread, crackers, salad dressing, soy sauce. It's added because just like salt, it increases the perception of flavour.

In order to avoid added processed sugar we'd all need to go back to the farm and only eat foods we'd made ourselves. Mayonnaise, salad dressing, condiments. It would be time consuming and hard.
 
Sal
No Party Affiliation
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

It's the Western fat diet.

We lack discipline.

no we don't lack discipline, because fat is not about a lack of discipline

there is a lack of understanding about what is full mentally, spiritually, emotionally and physically and they all work together

Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

I'd say it's the sugar in everything that does it. Combined with the low nutrient value in processed food. That and we've forgotten to be satisfied with satiated. Instead most people go for the busting gut full and undoing their pants.

oooooooooooooooh but our food is fine, safe, nutritious...those foods with GMO are all for our benefit.... no chemicals, no additives, nooooooooooooooo problem, just death by food...not the fault of big corporations...it's just poor will power...

the majority of people know next to zero about nutrition and will swallow anything (food) or opinion of even the most ignorant who present with authority
 
Zipperfish
No Party Affiliation
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

It's the Western fat diet.

We lack discipline.

We have instant availability to virtually any food we crave.
 
Sal
No Party Affiliation
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by ZipperfishView Post

We have instant availability to virtually any food we crave.

yes, and the more cr*p people eat, the more they crave
 
Twila
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by ZipperfishView Post

We have instant availability to virtually any food we crave.

instant gratification. Makes the old grey matter soft and oozy.
 
Sal
No Party Affiliation
+1
#12
I know people who have had this surgery to support them in weight loss. Not many, but in my small circle of people, I know of three.

It did not work long term for one single person. Mostly. It did work for one female who has gone back to eating but now has learned to purge. She manages to maintain a size 16 which is small for her since she was over 300 pounds. To me she is still an epic fail statistically.

Why is it that after all of this pain and money spent that people comply for likely a few months and then begin to cheat and fail?

Well for one thing, it does not deal with the psychological problem of the over eater. When someone can eat 2500 calories in one meal that has zero to do with need. One burger, fries and a pop. Nobody needs that in a meal and any meal that contains that amount of calories is unhealthy for the heart and other organs in the extreme.

We are a sedentary society. Even an hour or two a day of exercise is nothing if one consumes vast amounts of calories.

When I asked someone why they were having a lapband placed when if they just chose to eat normally instead of the way they would have to after, they said it was about health and it would prevent them from eating. Now they puke daily. So much for health.

Our food is just not nutritious enough unless we work on knowing how to eat.
 
Twila
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

I know people who have had this surgery to support them in weight loss. Not many, but in my small circle of people, I know of three.

It did not work long term for one single person. Mostly. It did work for one female who has gone back to eating but now has learned to purge. She manages to maintain a size 16 which is small for her since she was over 300 pounds. To me she is still an epic fail statistically.

Why is it that after all of this pain and money spent that people comply for likely a few months and then begin to cheat and fail?

Well for one thing, it does not deal with the psychological problem of the over eater. When someone can eat 2500 calories in one meal that has zero to do with need. One burger, fries and a pop. Nobody needs that in a meal and any meal that contains that amount of calories is unhealthy for the heart and other organs in the extreme.

We are a sedentary society. Even an hour or two a day of exercise is nothing if one consumes vast amounts of calories.

When I asked someone why they were having a lapband placed when if they just chose to eat normally instead of the way they would have to after, they said it was about health and it would prevent them from eating. Now they puke daily. So much for health.

Our food is just not nutritious enough unless we work on knowing how to eat.


2 Ltr's of pop a day is not normal. The portion size offered in restaurants is not a normal portion. A 12oz steak is not normal meat consumption. Gluttony is running rampant and everyone is making excuses for it. We have vanity sizing now. It's become ridiculous.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#14
I have no doubt that a certain amount of the problem is due to lack of discipline. Perhaps a good place to start would be to limiting restaurant meals to one or two a month. Actually I doubt if many people can afford more than that anyway. When you do go to a restaurant patronize places like Subway where you can actually see what they are putting in there.
 
Sal
No Party Affiliation
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

2 Ltr's of pop a day is not normal. The portion size offered in restaurants is not a normal portion. A 12oz steak is not normal meat consumption. Gluttony is running rampant and everyone is making excuses for it. We have vanity sizing now. It's become ridiculous.

exactly right...and it's not about quality here, it's about size... see what a portion size is in France compared to here...and they eat butter and sauces on everything, saturated fat galore, yet they are a lean country

this light this and light that is killing us

portions on plates are double that of 15 years ago and growing, as are we

except i have to say... we were in MacPukes not long ago for a free coffee and all the kids there were thin. Not their parents, but the kids were. It made me happy...it was like consuming a Happy Meal.

Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

I have no doubt that a certain amount of the problem is due to lack of discipline. Perhaps a good place to start would be to limiting restaurant meals to one or two a month. Actually I doubt if many people can afford more than that anyway. When you do go to a restaurant patronize places like Subway where you can actually see what they are putting in there.

Seriously JLM you need to know that eating Subway is akin to eating strychnine. I had no lunch yesterday when i went to work. I slipped out to the closest place...Subway. Purchased a turkey wrap for five bucks... it was a whole wheat wrap, with lettuce, tomato, cheese, cucs, light mayo and turkey....3 bites...just three bites to level my blood sugar and the rest went into the garbage. The sodium...over the top... disgusting...I couldn't swallow it.

when I go out to eat I want to enjoy it, eat bad and then eat well for the rest of the week.

and we split meals now, and no woman should eat what the guy eats...half or less...
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

exactly right...and it's not about quality here, it's about size... see what a portion size is in France compared to here...and they eat butter and sauces on everything, saturated fat galore, yet they are a lean country

this light this and light that is killing us

portions on plates are double that of 15 years ago and growing, as are we

except i have to say... we were in MacPukes not long ago for a free coffee and all the kids there were thin. Not their parents, but the kids were. It made me happy...it was like consuming a Happy Meal.


Seriously JLM you need to know that eating Subway is akin to eating strychnine. I had no lunch yesterday when i went to work. I slipped out to the closest place...Subway. Purchased a turkey wrap for five bucks... it was a whole wheat wrap, with lettuce, tomato, cheese, cucs, light mayo and turkey....3 bites...just three bites to level my blood sugar and the rest went into the garbage. The sodium...over the top... disgusting...I couldn't swallow it.

when I go out to eat I want to enjoy it, eat bad and then eat well for the rest of the week.

and we split meals now, and no woman should eat what the guy eats...half or less...

I certainly can't argue with you experience at Subway, but I've eaten there dozens if not hundreds of times and have never had a bad meal. I usually choose the multigrain bread and either chicken or beef and the rest is just salad vegetables, and their soups are excellent.
 
Twila
+1
#17
Why does Subway salad taste the same as their sandwhiches?
 
eh1eh
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

Why does Subway salad taste the same as their sandwhiches?

It's bad. Really bad. I won't set foot in a Subway again although I did go there frequently and got the alleged multi-grain bun.

Quote:

SUBWAY 9-GRAIN WHEAT (6")210 calories2 g fat (0.5 g saturated)410 mg sodiumOkay, so you're probably not in the habit of ordering a la carte bread loaves at Subway, but there’s a good chance you've eaten at least a few sandwiches built on this bread. The good news is that Subway actually delivers on the nine-grain promise. The bad news: Eight of those nine grains appear in miniscule amounts. If you look at a Subway ingredient statement, you'll find every grain except wheat listed at the bottom of the list, just beneath the qualifier "contains 2% or less." In fact, the primary ingredient in this bread is plain old white flour, and high-fructose corn syrup plays a more prominent role than any single whole grain. Essentially this is a white-wheat hybrid with trace amounts of other whole grains like oats, barley, and rye. So outside of the nine grains, how many ingredients does Subway use to keep this bread together? Sixteen, including such far-from-simple ingredients as DATEM, sodium steroyl lactylate, calcium sulfate, and azodiacarbonamide. But here's one that's a little unnerving: ammonium sulfate. This compound is loaded with nitrogen, which is why it's most common use is as fertilizer. You might have used it to nourish your plants at home. And Subway does the same thing; the ammonium sulfate nourishes the yeast and helps the bread turn brown. What, did you think that dark hue was the result of whole grains? Hardly. It's a combination of the...

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bill barilko
+2
#19
Gee I wouldn't drink 2 liters of pop in 2 years let alone a day-that would kill me in a month if I did.

I know one person who had gastric surgery can't remember the details he's lost a lot of weight but doesn't look healthy at all.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilkoView Post

Gee I wouldn't drink 2 liters of pop in 2 years let alone a day-that would kill me in a month if I did.

I know one person who had gastric surgery can't remember the details he's lost a lot of weight but doesn't look healthy at all.

Guys like that will never be healthy, they may postpone the inevitable for a year. People who "sell" this sh*t should be in jail.
 

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