ZED not ZEE... (Zed Or Zee)

Lithp
#1
colour not color
Neighbour not neighbor
honour not honor
zed not zee
lieutenant is pronounced "left-tenant" ( I know why...do you?)

As a Canadian do you adhere to the above Canadianisms?
 
Munkustrap
#2
All those you listed, yes. Though one thing I refrain from saying is scheduale (sheduale). I pronounce that (skeduale). There is also caramel (carmel), again I go with the caramel (care-a-mel). Proper pronunciation is slowly changing.
 
Andem
#3
I pretty much follow all of the above, including what Munkustrap mentioned. I have never even thought of the word carmel.
 
Ten Packs
#4
Carmel is a town in California - that's all.....
 
Twila
#5
There's also the pronunciation of Toyota Celica.

I say it Se-leek-a

I've heard US commercials pronounce it -Sel- ica
 
Twila
#6
There's also the pronunciation of Toyota Celica.

I say it Se-leek-a

I've heard US commercials pronounce it -Sel- ica
 
no1important
#7
I say Chesterfield not Couch
I say serviette not napkin
I say roof not ruff
I say railway not railroad
I say Linux not microsoft

The last one was a joke.
 
Col Man
#8
reminds me of that old song....
you say to-may-toe..
i say to-ma-to..
i say po-tay-toe
you say po-tar-toe....
 
no1important
#9
You know for two countries being so close, the "slang" is a little diferent. We use British measurements (like b4 metric we had a bigger gallon, quart, pint etc) and we spell like the British with the letter "u" in a lot of words ie. Valour, odour,honour etc. I guess that is a "small"part of what makes us "diferent" than the Americans.
 
Munkustrap
#10
A term my friends like to nail me on is when I say laundry machine. It seems like no one I knows calls the machine that washes your clothes (aka washing machine) a laundry machine. Please tell there is someone else out there who says the same as I.
 
no1important
#11
I say washing machine. But I do say "I am doing my laundry" or "I am going to the Laundry mat".

ha ha I guess that does not really help.

I think being so close to the big media giant we are slowly converting to American "slang" for a few things.
 
Hard-Luck Henry
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Col Man

reminds me of that old song....
you say to-may-toe..
i say to-ma-to..
i say po-tay-toe
you say po-tar-toe....

I know the song, Col Man, but I don't know anybody who says "po-tar-toe"
 
Jo Canadian
#13
Quote:

A term my friends like to nail me on is when I say laundry machine. It seems like no one I knows calls the machine that washes your clothes (aka washing machine) a laundry machine. Please tell there is someone else out there who says the same as I.

I usually call it a washing machine, but what I get caught on is the dish washer, becuse usually revert to washing machine at times.
 
GL Schmitt
#14
The acid test is whether you say a lu min um like an American, or a lu min i um like a Brit.
 
missile
#15
I refuse to call that little ole band from Texas,Zed Zed Top
 
DasFX
#16
Americans also say soda and not pop, they say bathroom, we say washroom . Where we say "You're welcome" in response to a thank-you, Americans give you a "uh huh"
 
TenPenny
#17
I have a lay-zed-boy chair...

Remember that ultimate Canadian commercial:

"Zellers, that's what we said,
Zellers, with a capital Z"
 
Andygal
#18
The only problem with saying "zed" is that then the alphabet song doesn't rhyme properly.

but I always write "colour", and "honour", I make a point of it.

And its "labour" , not "labor"
 
GreenGreta
#19
I remember saying to an American "I'm sorry?" instead of "what?". They truly didn't get the politeness, finally I had to go "huh" so they would finally realize I didn't hear them.

But all the others, yes I comply.
 
ElPolaco
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by DasFX

Americans also say soda and not pop, they say bathroom, we say washroom . Where we say "You're welcome" in response to a thank-you, Americans give you a "uh huh"

Folks here make fun of the term "soda" as "eastern".
 
Gordon J Torture
#21
Quote:

zed not zee

I like Zee, it rhymes better in the ABC song.

edit: Just realized Andygirl aready said this .. nm.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#22
FUDGESICLE

Canadians say fudge-icle, Americans say fudge-sicle, they pronounce the silent 's', the silly buggers. 8-)
 
Hard-Luck Henry
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Gordon J Torture

Quote:

zed not zee

I like Zee, it rhymes better in the ABC song.

edit: Just realized Andygirl aready said this .. nm.

I notice that you use 'realized', where I would use 'realised'.

The use of 'ize' isn't considered an Americanism, though - British spelling recognises both forms (our spelling was never standardised in the way that American English was).

Using 'ise' has the advantage that lazy spellers do not have to remember that there are several important words which cannot properly be spelt with -ize. Some words are not formed by the addition of the -ize prefix to a stem, but by some other root which happens to end in the same syllable, such as -vise (as in televise), -cise (as in incise), and -prise (as in comprise).

The American system has resulted in the overuse of 'z' in some words where it did not originally belong. Writers of American English should be aware of some spellings that are regarded as incorrect in the UK, such as analyze.
 
zenfisher
#24
No realise in The Canadian Concise Dictionary Henry. I guess It is a N. American ideology.Hmmm... I wonder if realeyes would be possible...
 
TenPenny
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Haggis McBagpipe

FUDGESICLE

Canadians say fudge-icle, Americans say fudge-sicle, they pronounce the silent 's', the silly buggers.

Oddly enough, everyone I know in the Maritimes says "fudge-sicle", and I read in some article recently that NBers say "sneakers", which is considered an Americanism, too. And I know we've been doing that for 40 odd years, so TV wasn't a cause.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny

Quote: Originally Posted by Haggis McBagpipe

FUDGESICLE

Canadians say fudge-icle, Americans say fudge-sicle, they pronounce the silent 's', the silly buggers. 8-)

Oddly enough, everyone I know in the Maritimes says "fudge-sicle", and I read in some article recently that NBers say "sneakers", which is considered an Americanism, too. And I know we've been doing that for 40 odd years, so TV wasn't a cause.

There are some real regional differences that way, aren't there. I've heard that there are a lot of Americans in some of the northeastern states who say 'eh'.
 
Hard-Luck Henry
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by zenfisher

No realise in The Canadian Concise Dictionary Henry. I guess It is a N. American ideology.Hmmm... I wonder if realeyes would be possible...

No, nor in the Oxford English Dictionary that I use, zen. Like I say both are acceptable; as with most 'rules' in English spelling and grammar, I think the only rule is that you're consistent. The same rule applies with words like 'burnt/burned' or 'while/whilst' or double inverted commas ( " ) or single ( ' ).

Blah, it's all bollocks ... did someone say "real ales"? :P
 
zenfisher
#28
I like Real ales...Now your talking Henry.
 
BC Bob
#29
ive never heard "laundry machine" before, but i have heard of the laundry mat or laundro-mat. is this a new words canadians are starting to use? if so, ive never heard it myself.

i do sometimes, but only sometimes, say zee instead of zed but normally after being around americans or watching american tv me thinks.
 
Nascar_James
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by BC Bob

ive never heard "laundry machine" before, but i have heard of the laundry mat or laundro-mat. is this a new words canadians are starting to use? if so, ive never heard it myself.

i do sometimes, but only sometimes, say zee instead of zed but normally after being around americans or watching american tv me thinks.

Yeah, I did the same after I had moved to the US. No one here knows what ZED is, so everyone uses ZEE.

I also noticed how you reply back to a thank you down here is different from Canada. In Canada it is common practice to use "you're welcome" or "no problem". Here, is is very common to use "you bet". I've adpoted it myself.
 
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