happy canada deh

darkbeaver
#31
I'm mainly into organic stimulents excepting LCD and few others infreguently, only keep abrest of developements, and it can't be done, these compounds are put here for our enjoyment.

In the meat realm.
 
Danbones
#32
hey
the morning glory is pretty organic
and just dripping with LEDs

Mikro doses have been shown to be very theraputic
Macro doses have been shown to be extra very supertheraputalistcacidosis
 
darkbeaver
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by DanbonesView Post

hey
the morning glory is pretty organic
and just dripping with LEDs

Mikro doses have been shown to be very theraputic
Macro doses have been shown to be extra very supertheraputalistc

I thought it was poisonous. They lied to me again,

T he place is covered with it,preperation please?
 
Cliffy
+2
#34
 
JLM
#35
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post



Happy Dominion Day


Exactly- I don't know whose hare brained idea it was to change the name from Dominion Day to Canada Day.
 
Locutus
#36
The death of 'Dominion Day'



A wise nation preserves its records, gathers up its muniments, decorates the tombs of its illustrious dead, repairs great public structures, and fosters national pride and love of country, by perpetual reference to the sacrifices and glories of the past.





By The Ottawa Citizen September 1, 2006




A wise nation preserves its records, gathers up its muniments, decorates the tombs of its illustrious dead, repairs great public structures, and fosters national pride and love of country, by perpetual reference to the sacrifices and glories of the past.


-- Joseph Howe, Father of Confederation.






In hindsight, it was a case of identity theft, an act of historical vandalism. A quarter-century ago, 13 members of Parliament hastily -- some say indecently -- renamed the country's national birthday in a swift bit of legislative sleight-of-hand.


At 4 o'clock on Friday, July 9, 1982, the House of Commons was almost empty. The 13 parliamentarians taking up space in the 282-seat chamber were, by most accounts, half asleep as they began Private Members' Hour. But then one of the more wakeful Liberals noticed the Tory MPs were slow to arrive in the chamber. Someone -- exactly who has never been firmly identified -- remembered Bill C-201, a private member's bill from Hal Herbert, the Liberal MP from Vaudreuil, that had been gathering dust ever since it had received first reading in May of 1980. "An Act to Amend the Holidays Act" proposed to change the name of the July 1 national holiday from "Dominion Day" to "Canada Day."


This wasn't the first time the change had been attempted. Between 1946 and 1982, there were some 30 attempts to push such revisionist legislation through the House of Commons. But there was always enough opposition to hold the postmodern crowd at bay. On this July afternoon, however, MPs seized the opportunity to rewrite history with all the haste of a shoplifter. Deputy Speaker Lloyd Francis called up the languishing legislation and, faster than you can say patronage appointment, sped it through to third reading without much more than a querulous murmur from the attendant parliamentarians. Tory Senator Walter Baker barely managed a befuddled query of "What is going on?" before Francis inquired whether the bill had unanimous consent. Somehow, according to Hansard, it did, despite Baker's apparent opposition. He later referred to Canada Day as "sterile, neutral, dull and somewhat plastic."


The whole process took five minutes. The MPs celebrated by declaring an early end to session at 4:05 p.m. "It is only appropriate that, in celebrating our new holiday called Canada Day, we should at least take a holiday of 55 minutes this afternoon," said New Democrat Mark Rose.


Such insouciance toward a long-held tradition was typical. The bill should never have been brought to a vote. At least 20 MPs were required to be in the House to conduct business. With only 13 members in the House that afternoon, there was no quorum to pass legislation.


- ot that Speaker Jeanne Sauve was troubled. When the procedural irregularity was brought to her attention, she said that since no one called a quorum count, a quorum was deemed to exist, and, ergo, no procedural rules were violated.


And so today, Canadians mark their nation's birthday with a banal contrivance. Of course, to say this is to be labelled as out-of-date or dismissed as a colonial romantic.


As one young colleague put it: "It's Canada Day now. Get used to it. It only means something to people your age."

The death of 'Dominion Day'
 

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