First Nations history

Cliffy
#1
First Nations history should make us question what it means to be Canadian


By APARNA SANYAL
In 1882, Cree chief Big Bear, his people starving, adhered to Treaty 6 in exchange for food from the Dominion of Canada. He had argued for fairer treaty provisions, but rations had been deliberately withheld by the government of Sir John A. Macdonald, whose plan was to “starve unco-operative Indians onto reserves and into submission.” Big Bear began negotiating with other Cree communities to take reserve lands next to each other. Macdonald’s government rejected the chief’s proposal, reneging on an earlier promise. Big Bear later tried to dissuade members of his band from violence against white settlers, helping instead with the release of hostages. Amid widespread indigenous famine, Sir John A. Macdonald focused on his National Dream, his Indian commissioner declaring of rancid rations: “The Indians should eat the bacon or die.”


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First Nations history should make us question what it means to be Canadian | On First Nation Issues, Jobs, Events, And Environmental Issues On The West Coast And World Events.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#2
Are you going somewhere with this, or just posting it as a matter of interest?
 
MHz
#3
It's part of the plot to a new video game featuring First Nations history to set the in-game rules and area and dress codes and have a Black-op element to it where steeling a pony or a girl gets the most points. (if you steal a girl you have to marry her and stay married for the whole game, that being said there are benefits)
The Smoke House needs to be free from international intervention as far as what is on the menu. At least that is what I took it to mean based on previous posts. No doubt by now you have some interesting thought to add.
 
Cliffy
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Are you going somewhere with this, or just posting it as a matter of interest?

A matter of interest. But there seems to be a lot of misconceptions about aboriginal people on these forums. Maybe I was trying to educate them. My personal feelings about our culture can be summed up with this:

 
petros
#5
I've had the story of Big Bear passed to me over the years. If you know the story of the Plains Cree, her maiden name will explain the link. http://www.lenecrologue.com/obituary/deceased/214403 and add your comments here: http://forums.canadiancontent.net/fu...vest-moon.html
 
MHz
#6
Navajo Wisdom
About 1966 or so, a NASA team doing work for the Apollo moon mission took the astronauts near Tuba City where the terrain of the Navajo Reservation looks very much like the Lunar surface. Along with all the trucks and large vehicles, there were two large figures dressed in full Lunar spacesuits.
Nearby a Navajo sheep herder and his son were watching the strange creatures walk about, occasionally being tended by personnel. The two Navajo people were noticed and approached by the NASA personnel. Since the man did not know English, his son asked for him what the strange creatures were and the NASA people told them that they are just men that are getting ready to go to the moon.
The man became very excited and asked if he could send a message to the moon with the astronauts. The NASA personnel thought this was a great idea so they rustled up a tape recorder. After the man gave them his message, they asked his son to translate. His son would not.
Later, they tried a few more people on the reservation to translate and every person they asked would chuckle and then refuse to translate.
Finally, with cash in hand, someone translated the message, "Watch out for these guys, they come to take your land."



http://www.jamesoberg.com/humor.html

 
PoliticalNick
#7
WTF do first nations have to do with being Canadian? They claim to be their own separate nations with their own government right? So really they have sweet F all to do with being Canadian.
 
petros
+1
#8
Not everybody feels that way. There is a divide. There are those who feel the chief routine and oppression is something to get rid of.
 
MHz
#9
We keep them under lock and key, ...... try explaining that at the UN while Gaza is the topic up for debate. The Church and State don't seem to be none too quick to pay damages caused by the schooling system that was set up. I'm pretty sure farmers would have been happy to see extra hands at harvest yet no have to feed them for the other 10 months that is spent watching grass grow. (and being able to comment on the changes)
To integrate them into the western civilization there should have been groups that went tourist class to see most of the world over about 4 or 5 trips. If nothing else they would see just how big 'the enemy' is and at best they may see some methods that would help at home and have a few suggestions of their own that would aid others.

If North and South American bands could resurrect the old smoke houses they would have a booming business is 'weekend warriors' that come with a doctors note and an insurance form and 3 days later the quest is over and the band is richer and the customers have already booked the next session. Certainly better for the Rez than a Provincial Park where drinking is restricted, that it would make 4x the cash in the typical off season is probably why it would never be approved.
 
petros
#10
We do or their Royals do?
 
MHz
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

We do or their Royals do?

The Royals are responsible for any Treaties signed before July 1, 1867, after that the Provincial Govt should be where the disputes are heard as they were Sovereign Provinces when the Queen pretended to let us go, it was actually a tax increase and dispensing of some of the obligations, like coming to our rescue in a time of war.
 
petros
#12
The Native Royals? Are we talking about the same people?
 
MHz
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

The Native Royals? Are we talking about the same people?

I'm from Germany, my Royals are as bad as Britain ever was. We usually try and fully exterminate any other Royals we meet.
 
Zipperfish
+2
#14
First Nations history is boring. Canadian history is boring. It's cruel to make kids learn that crap.
 
MHz
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by ZipperfishView Post

First Nations history is boring. Canadian history is boring. It's cruel to make kids learn that crap.

I take it your parents were kind to you in all areas of knowledge.
 
petros
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by ZipperfishView Post

First Nations history is boring. Canadian history is boring. It's cruel to make kids learn that crap.

It's better listening to the history over smoked pickerel and crème cheese on bannock and a box of wine.
 
Dexter Sinister
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by ZipperfishView Post

First Nations history is boring. Canadian history is boring. It's cruel to make kids learn that crap.

From which I conclude you've learned nothing about either of them since high school, and probably weren't paying much attention then either.
 
petros
#18
There used to be a bar in St Louis that sold double coated Chesters Chicken. It was a nice treat for when taking a break from walking through the history of the NorthWest Rebellion and fishing the river.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

A matter of interest. But there seems to be a lot of misconceptions about aboriginal people on these forums. Maybe I was trying to educate them. My personal feelings about our culture can be summed up with this:

Always interested to learn. Gotta say, though, I prefer our history before the Shemanese.
 
PoliticalNick
+2
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Shemanese.

Is that a tribe of transvestites or trans-gendered?
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNickView Post

Is that a tribe of transvestites or trans-gendered?

It's you, so I guess "both" is the right answer.
 
PoliticalNick
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

It's you, so I guess "both" is the right answer.

I'm neither, try again!
 
Cliffy
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Always interested to learn. Gotta say, though, I prefer our history before the Shemanese.

I was asked by our museums curator why I was not active at the museum. I said I was not interested in "white" history but, if the crap ever hits the fan and the lights go out, I know where I can find all the tools and appliances I need.
 
MHz
#24
To fit in with the museum pieces you also need to have some success stories of ingratiation despite the racial obstacles put in place. Digital wandering around the world as well as boots on the ground. Rodeos were my closest exposure followed closely by payday at the bars. It was a tossup as to which was the most dangerous.
 
petros
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Always interested to learn. Gotta say, though, I prefer our history before the Shemanese.

Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNickView Post

Is that a tribe of transvestites or trans-gendered?

Cross dressers. Indians that dresses up like a cowboys and cowboys that dress up like Indians.
 
MHz
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Cross dressers. Indians that dresses up like a cowboys and cowboys that dress up like Indians.

More like the dance when the rodeo was over.
 
petros
#27
Do you do the gay rodeo circuit? Rid a little bare back? Bull ride?
 
MHz
#28
No, but they will let the drunk fans on the fence sit on a bareback in a corner of the arena. They probably gain a new appreciation of what a time ride is like. TeePee Creek is not a points event but is the home turf of where the bucking stock comes from for the points events, bulls and horses.

The pervs are getting rode by the animals, what did you think was going to happen?
 
skookumchuck
+3
#29  Top Rated Post
Few have had the guts to even try and publish the actual true history of natives. They prefer to publish the lies for money. There are numerous people, like a few we have on this board who are in love with the bullspit side that is advanced by lawyers, movie makers, university mugs, and assorted white hippees.
If the institutionalized (on reserve) natives in our country were taught to try instead of whine by that group we would have little or no problem. My grandfather and his brothers taught our family well, just before and during the great wars, none of them stayed on reserve, none of them even considered anything other than working.
The side of the family that decided to be trappers and guides are still doing that, the side that decided to be in construction may have built your house. The side that decided to be losers are still losers but some have big bucks from BS, others try but cannot stay sober long enough, just like many Irishmen.
 
EagleSmack
#30
But they were so one with nature. lol

 

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