Canada slaps 276% Tariff on Foreign Drywall


Machjo
#31
Canada should have a law that allows a municipality to declare itself a Free Economic Zone. Within that municipality, no tariffs, no subsidies, basic taxes, no frills or gimmicks (e.g. CBC funding).
 
Danbones
+1
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by MachjoView Post

Then it would slowly come back, no?

And remember, to subsidize drywall, the US goverents must tax everyone else or borrow. If it taxes everyone else, then that benefits every other Canadian industry.

If it borrows, then it benefits Canada's banking industry. We buy them out.



But why drywall specifically?

no jobs no money
then all your logic sort of collapses
no?
 
petros
+1
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by MachjoView Post

Canada should have a law that allows a municipality to declare itself a Free Economic Zone. Within that municipality, no tariffs, no subsidies, basic taxes, no frills or gimmicks (e.g. CBC funding).

Then who would pay carbon taxes?
 
Danbones
+1
#34
Canada: The Canadian International Trade Tribunal has started an inquiry to determine whether the dumping of gypsum wallboard from the US has damaging effects on the local market. The inquiry follows an investigation by the Canada Border Services Agency. The tribunal will determine whether the dumping has caused injury or retardation or is threatening to cause injury to the domestic industry.
Canada - Gypsum industry news from Global Gypsum (external - login to view)
 
petros
#35
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

French Canadians are the Dry-Wall Kings!

When I was in the trades in Boston all of the Dry Wall contractors were French Canadian. One of the younger ones who actually spoke English told me they get up at about 2:00AM and drive down from "Northern New Hampshire", work 10 hours, and leave work early on Friday.

There is truth in them words.
 
EagleSmack
+1
#36
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

French Canadians are the Dry-Wall Kings!

When I was in the trades in Boston all of the Dry Wall contractors were French Canadian. One of the younger ones who actually spoke English told me they get up at about 2:00AM and drive down from "Northern New Hampshire", work 10 hours, and leave work early on Friday.

Got to move this to the new page.
 
petros
+1
#37
Quote: Originally Posted by DanbonesView Post

Canada: The Canadian International Trade Tribunal has started an inquiry to determine whether the dumping of gypsum wallboard from the US has damaging effects on the local market. The inquiry follows an investigation by the Canada Border Services Agency. The tribunal will determine whether the dumping has caused injury or retardation or is threatening to cause injury to the domestic industry.
Canada - Gypsum industry news from Global Gypsum (external - login to view)

Is cheaper non carbon taxed cement being "dumped" in Canada too or is Carbon Taxes the problem?
 
Danbones
#38
synthetics might be the problem
https://www.gypsum.org/press-room/media-guide/ (external - login to view)
"Gypsum manufacturers also increasingly rely on “synthetic” gypsum as an effective alternative to natural gypsum ore. Synthetic gypsum is a byproduct primarily from the desulfurization of the flue gases in fossil-fueled power plants."

OBAMA HATES COAL PLANTS

States imported crude gypsum from 15 countries and exported
gypsum wallboard to 69 countries and territories
http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pu...gypsumyb04.pdf

Guess where they get their raw materials if not synthetic?
...and shortly it looks like they expect the asian board markets to possibly take off and they would like to still have a Canadian industry to take advantage of that

Screw the peeps though, they may not count
 
petros
#39
Fly ash isn't the problem Carbon taxes and high energy are.
 
Machjo
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by DanbonesView Post

no jobs no money
then all your logic sort of collapses
no?

No money no imports. Nooney, cheap labour. Cheap labour, export boom.

Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Then who would pay carbon taxes?

Carbon taxes are not protectionist if they apply to domestic carbon too.
 
lone wolf
#41
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

Still unclear how the Fort MacMurry rebuild is affected by this tax/tarrif. The local drywall is still available at the same price it always was.

Can't sell a story without drama....
 
petros
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by MachjoView Post

No money no imports. Nooney, cheap labour. Cheap labour, export boom.



Carbon taxes are not protectionist if they apply to domestic carbon too.

They don't apply to imports but do if domestic. Read the link posted.

Canada’s cement industry is crumbling (external - login to view)
 
Danbones
#43
we can not compete with Asia for cheap labour
we have standards that they do not have to meet no how

Your idea will wind us up like Venezuela
"IMF Sees Venezuela Inflation Rocketing to 720 Percent in 2016"
www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...ercent-in-2016 (external - login to view)
 
petros
#44
Try drawing parallels sometime.

Canada’s cement industry is crumbling (external - login to view)
 
Danbones
#45
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPennyView Post

How do you figure that it only applies in Western Canada?
Edited to note, I see that it does, in fact, only apply to imports into Western Canada

see it was true

wwwyoutubecomwatchvOCmuATH2yzo


doh!!!

Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Try drawing parallels sometime.

Canada’s cement industry is crumbling (external - login to view)

like making a picture to get my point across?
hmmmm...
 
Walter
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPennyView Post

Note that the whole point is to protect the drywall manufacturers in Western Canada:


"The complainant alleges that the dumping has caused injury and is threatening to cause injury to the Western Canadian industry producing the like goods."


So, you allege that Trudeau is giving the finger to Western Canada by protecting the jobs in Western Canada as requested by the manufacturers in Western Canada?

Tariffs never protected nuthin.
 
Ludlow
#47
plaster them fookin walls then pricks..
 
Machjo
#48
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

They don't apply to imports but do if domestic. Read the link posted.

Canada’s cement industry is crumbling (external - login to view)

Ah, that's a problem.

I can see a few solutions.

1. Let the Canadian cement industry die. One problem with that is efficiency-wise is that it is even less efficient to then have to import cement from the US than to produce it locally.

2. Raise tariffs on US cement. One problem with efficiency-wise that is the risk of people in Western Canada buying cement from Eastern Canada or vice versa when without tariffs they could buy it from just across the border much nearer-by.

3. Give foreign states an option. We exclude foreigncement from the Canadian market but allow foreigncement-manufacturers to avoid the tariff by agreeing to pay a higher carbon tax to their government and so obtain a tariff-free status from the Canadian embassy.

Few businesses on other continents would be interested in that option, but some businesses in the US might. If Canada can produce all of its own cement, few if any businesses in the US would choose to pay a higher carbon tax just to access the Canadian market. However, should Canada experience severe shortages resulting in extremely expensive cement, then some US businesses that choose to specialise in exportation to Canada might voluntarily choose to pay a higher carbon tax to the US government so as to obtain free access to the Canadian market. That way we still have free trade with the US on an equal footing.

Just ideas.
 
petros
+1
#49
Or ditch cement from the "carbon tax formula". If BC didn't import 2/3 of their cement they'd walk all over AB as carbon emitters.
 
tay
#50
A union that represents workers in Canadian drywall factories is telling the prime minister a decision that could help the construction business might cost its members their jobs.

The International Brotherhood of Boilermakers have written Justin Trudeau asking that cabinet reject a trade tribunal's recommendation to relax anti-dumping duties that were imposed on imported U.S. drywall.

Earlier this month, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal found that American-made drywall dumped at less than normal prices into Western Canada over the past few years has hurt the Canadian industry.

The ruling called for replacing duties of up to 276 per cent that Canada imposed last year with permanent variable duties on any imports that fall below a floor price.

But the union says a recommendation that final duties be temporarily eliminated for a six-month period would hurt workers at gypsum board plants in Calgary and Winnipeg if the government approves the idea.

The union tells Trudeau that when preliminary duties were introduced, its members were rehired for a full shift at Calgary and an additional shift was introduced at Winnipeg.

"While your government has not accepted the tribunal's recommendations, the pessimism and expectation of continued unabated dumping have generated has already had an adverse impact on our members," says the letter to Trudeau, signed by Rob Lauzon, the union's assistant director of industrial sector operations.

The Western Canada Alliance of Wall and Ceiling Contractors applauded the tribunal's conclusion that the duties hurt consumers, and it called for a longer period than six months for the temporary elimination of final duties so that builders could fulfil their fixed-price contracts.

The duties were imposed after a dumping complaint by French-owned CertainTeed Gypsum Canada, the last drywall manufacturer in Western Canada with plants in Vancouver, Calgary and Winnipeg, and at two gypsum quarries, one in B.C. and one in Manitoba.

Fort McMurray mayor Melissa Blake said people who lost their homes in last year's devastating wildfire would suffer with a couple of thousand extra dollars in costs because of the drywall duties. Blake called for the federal government to offer grants to offset the impact of the duties.

The letter from the boilermakers' union says it supports duty relief for Fort McMurray, but that no Canadian worker should lose his or her livelihood to unfairly traded imports.

"There are no other good Canadian middle class jobs available for our members," the letter states.

Union asks Trudeau to halt push for relaxed anti-dumping duties on U.S. drywall | Metro Calgary (external - login to view)
 
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