University groups try to stave off offensive costumes in lead-up to Halloween


spaminator
#1
University groups try to stave off offensive costumes in lead-up to Halloween
Michelle McQuigge, THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 07:41 AM EDT | Updated: Monday, October 24, 2016 07:51 AM EDT
TORONTO - Geishas are out. Feathered headdresses are forbidden. And if you’re planning to wear a Bill Cosby or Caitlyn Jenner costume, you may not be welcome at your Halloween party of choice.
A growing number of institutions are starting to take a more proactive approach to potentially offensive outfits by developing strategies and even explicit policies to prevent people from donning controversial getups.
Costumes depicting specific cultural traditions are the most common focus of such efforts, which are making themselves felt in schools and universities.
The student union at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ont., recently prepared a list of prohibited costumes for its annual Halloween bash. The list features any form of headdress, costumes that mock suicide or rape, those depicting transgender activist Caitlyn Jenner, or outfits featuring a culture’s traditional attire.
Such approaches don’t always sit right with groups concerned with issues of censorship.
The Canadian Civil Liberties Association says Halloween forces people to walk a particularly fine line as they juggle cultural sensitivity with freedom of expression.
Equality Program Director Noa Mendelsohn Aviv said Halloween is steeped in a long tradition of social activism which would not have been possible if participants were excessively concerned with offending others.
She said the tradition of wearing costumes, for instance, often gave repressed members of the LGBTQ community opportunities to express themselves more fully at a time when such actions were discouraged.
Context is everything when it comes to cultural costumes, she said, adding past and present social conditions can often conspire to make a costume feel offensive to the group being depicted.
She said protesters should have every right to voice their displeasure, but celebrants should also be allowed to be offensive.
“We have to be very careful not to repress that kind of expression,” she said. “It’s very important there be room for all kinds of different personal and political and subversive and dissenting expression, and Halloween is a time when that really happens.”
Mendelsohn Aviv praised one technique put into practice three years ago at McGill University, whose student union issued colour-coded tags to attendees of its 2014 Halloween party. Green tags meant the costume was considered appropriate, yellow tags were for those who’s choice of attire was considered questionable, and red tags were reserved for those believed to have crossed a line into offensive territory.
Mendelsohn Aviv said social censure, rather than more active punishments, can be an effective way to give everyone a voice while still expressing that certain costumes may be in poor taste.
Student Society vice-president of University Affairs Erin Sobat said the McGill has abandoned the colour-coding system in recent years and is now focused on educating people about appropriate costumes ahead of the 2016 festivities.
Like Brock, McGill frowns upon cultural costumes but has not gone so far as to prepare a prohibited list.
Sobat said the aim of the education workshops and campus posters is to make people think beyond their costumes and reflect on the messages they may be sending.
“I think it’s worth asking who is doing the subverting and who is benefiting from that or not,” he said. “It’s easy, as a white person, to dress up as a black person for a day and then go back to being a white person and not having to face the daily discrimination and stereotyping that goes along with that.”
Hughes views it somewhat different, arguing people’s feelings are valid whether the costume-wearer agrees with them or not.
“It’s not for me to say, ’that shouldn’t affect you that way,”’ he said. “If it does, it does.”
The Toronto District School Board said in an email that it doesn’t have any policy specifically related to Halloween costumes, but expects any get up to “comply with the board’s appropriate dress policy.”
University groups try to stave off offensive costumes in lead-up to Halloween |
 
Danbones
#2
those masks interfere somewhat with the resulting face palms
 
spaminator
#3
Brock University stamps out ‘prohibited’ Halloween costumes
Postmedia Network
First posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 12:21 PM EDT | Updated: Monday, October 24, 2016 12:29 PM EDT
ST. CATHARINES, Ont. — One Ontario university has already laid down the law on what costumes will be “prohibited” at the campus Halloween party this year.
Brock University’s list includes ankle-length robes worn by Arab men, makeup depicting Japanese geishas, anything with the Confederate flag on it, and costumes that depict Caitlyn Jenner, the transgender celebrity.
According to the school’s “costume protocol” developed by the student union, traditional or religious headdresses such as feathered bonnets and turbans, are also off limits.
“If a member of your party is denied entry because of their costume, they will be escorted to a space where they can change or remove the offending item,” students have been told.
Brock’s list of political correctness is just the latest in a trend that’s picking up across North America. The University of Florida recently issued a memo reminding students they can submit a “bias incident report” and seek counselling if they encounter an offensive costume.
Last year, when Yale University sent out a mass e-mail about appropriate Halloween wear, Erika Christakis, a lecturer in early childhood education, wrote back wondering if administrators had lost faith in the ability of young people to “exercise self-censure, through social norming.”
“Is there no room anymore for a child or young person to be a little bit obnoxious ... a little bit inappropriate or provocative or, yes, offensive?” Christakis wrote.
Brock University’s student union developed its costume rules following outcry two years ago over a group of students who dressed in blackface as the Jamaican bobsled team.
In a Friday statement, Brock University said “applauds our student union’s efforts to educate people about the importance of being respectful in what we say and wear, including at Halloween.
“Brock is a vibrant, tolerant community where people of all cultures, religions and orientations are accepted and welcomed,” the statement continued.
Brock University stamps out ‘prohibited’ Halloween costumes | Canada | News | To
 
DaSleeper
#4
If Wiccans were to object to people dressing as witches......I wonder how that would go over....


Political correctness and hurt feelings gone wild.....
 
Jinentonix
#5
Of course I'm sure you'll still be able to dress up as a leprechaun even though you're not Irish. I bet you can wear lederhosen even if you're not German.

Man I can't wait for these snowflakes to enter the real world. They're going to have a real eye-opening experience.
 
mentalfloss
#6
Conservatives support niqabs now.

All it took was a little political correctness.
 
Blackleaf
#7
When are these institutions going to ban the burka?
 
Tecumsehsbones
#8
My costume's real easy. It's just my regular clothes with my fly unzipped and a potato hanging out of it. When people ask, I tell 'em I'm a dick-tater.
 
mentalfloss
#9
In other news, pipeline proponent, Peter Pecker is profoundly peeved at people picking on his name and decided to report it to the human rights tribunal of Canada.


Conservatives are environmentalists now.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#10  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

In other news, pipeline proponent, Peter Pecker is profoundly peeved at people picking on his name and decided to report it to the human rights tribunal of Canada.


Conservatives are environmentalists now.

Will Dick Johnson be joining in the complaint?
 
Cannuck
#11
I'm going to go as a white guy this year and then report myself to the human rights people. White folks should be allowed to be whiny too
 
Cannuck
#12

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1EY7lYRneHc

 
DaSleeper
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

I'm going to go as a white guy this year and then report myself to the human rights people. White folks should be allowed to be whiny too

Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1EY7lYRneHc

 
Cannuck
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeperView Post

What do Trumpites have to do with this
 

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