Gap Kids U.K. ad highlights the problem of women who want to be scholars


spaminator
#1
Gap Kids U.K. ad highlights the problem of women who want to be scholars
Katie Zeppieri, Guest Columnist
First posted: Saturday, August 13, 2016 05:49 PM EDT | Updated: Saturday, August 13, 2016 08:34 PM EDT
It’s ironic that the company whose gender equality efforts landed them the 2016 Catalyst award (an award that they shared with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau) can’t seem to get it just quite right.
A new Gap Kids ad from the U.K. has come under fire in the past week for labelling girls as “social butterflies” and boys as “scholars.”
Defenders of the campaign state the ad doesn’t prohibit girls from becoming scholars and that they can choose to be whatever they want to be. After all, to paraphrase Mr. Trudeau—it’s 2016.
And in this sense, the defenders are correct. Studies show that girls can and do choose to be scholars. Statistics Canada found that 62% of Canadian undergraduates are women. This ratio is continued in post-graduate programs with women making up 54% of graduates.
So no, the Gap Kids ad, and those like it, do not seem to inhibit women’s scholarly pursuits. But they do tell us something about how we view gender roles.
While women are graduating from university at a higher rate than men, there is a contrast between the fields that men and women pursue.
Men still dominate in higher-paying STEM faculties (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). In a 2011 study by Statistics Canada, women accounted for only 23% of graduates with a university degree in engineering and 30% of those with a degree in mathematics and computer science.
Could the lack of women in STEM be connected to gender labels that have yet to be broken?
Joan C. Williams, a professor of law at the University of California’s Hastings College of the Law and co-author of a report titled Double Jeopardy, seems to think so.
In the 2015 report, the authors surveyed 557 women in STEM and found a pervasive gender bias.
“Women walk a tightrope between being seen as too feminine, and so liked but not respected—or too masculine, and so respected but disliked,” noting that because of this tightrope, women often feel pressured to take-on “dead-end” roles from acting as administrative assistants to fetching coffee.
The gender bias Williams speaks about starts early. The Canadian Women’s Foundation found that as girls enter adolescence, their confidence declines sharply and they experience higher rates of depression. They cite the cause of this drop in confidence as a result of media influences placing value on a girl’s appearance rather than her intelligence.
Advertisements like the latest Gap Kids campaign reinforce gender labels that plant seeds for female inadequacy in the future.
Perhaps the girl in the ad should be less concerned about being the “talk of the playground” and more concerned with having something to say.
-- Katie Zeppieri is the Founder & Chief Empowerment Officer of Make Your Mark & GIRL TALK
@KatieZeppieri (external - login to view)
A Gap Kids ad that ran in the U.K. (Supplied)

Gap Kids U.K. ad highlights the problem of women who want to be scholars | GUEST
 
Blackleaf
#2
Female scholars?



By the way, they've spelt Einstein wrong.
 
Danbones
#3
scholars?
in the UK?

I thought that was what the colonies were for
 
Blackleaf
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by DanbonesView Post

scholars?
in the UK?

I thought that was what the colonies were for

 
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